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Carnivora is the premier Animal discussion and debate forum on the internet. Originators of species profiles, we have the most extensive range of animal profiles with the most detailed information that is constantly updated as it becomes available. We were the first forum to include a dedicated interspecific conflict board to allow discussion of hypothetical animal matchups. So please take time to view our site and the range of topics available, and also take the opportunity to become a member of our community.

Pic Of Week


Highlights from Maasai mara Sightings

Leopard Seal v Blue Shark (school of 3)

Posted by Taipan (Admins) at Yesterday, 10:52 PM. 4 comments

Leopard Seal - Hydrurga leptonyx
The leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), also referred to as the sea leopard, is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the southern elephant seal). It is most common in the southern hemisphere along the coast of Antarctica and on most sub-Antarctic islands, but can also be found on the coasts of southern Australia, Tasmania, South Africa, New Zealand, Lord Howe Island, Tierra del Fuego, the Cook Islands, and the Atlantic coast of South America. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Orcas and large sharks are the only natural predators of leopard seals. The leopard seal is large and muscular, with a dark grey back and light grey on its stomach. Its throat is whitish with the black spots that give the seal its common name. Females are slightly larger than the males. The overall length of this seal is 2.4-3.5 m (7.9-11.7 ft) and weight is from 200 to 600 kilograms (440 to 1,300 lb). They are about the same length as the northern walrus but usually less than half the weight. Its front teeth are sharp like those of other carnivores, but its molars lock together in a way that allows them to sieve krill from the water, in the manner of the crabeater seal.The leopard seal is second only to the orca among Antarctica's top predators. Its canine teeth are 2.5 cm (1 in). It feeds on a wide variety of creatures. Smaller seals probably eat mostly krill, but also squid and fish. Larger leopard seals probably switch from krill to more substantial prey, including king, adelie, rockhopper, gentoo and emperor penguins, and less frequently, other seals such as the crabeater seal.

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Blue Shark (school of 3) - Prionace glauca
The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is a species of requiem shark, family Carcharhinidae, that inhabits deep waters in the world's temperate and tropical oceans. Preferring cooler waters, blue sharks migrate long distances, for example from New England to South America. Although generally lethargic, they can move very quickly. Blue sharks are viviparous and are noted for large litters of 25 to over 100 pups. They feed primarily on small fish and squid, although they can take larger prey. Blue sharks often school segregated by sex and size, and this behavior has led to their nickname "wolves of the sea". Maximum lifespan is still unknown, but it is believed that they can live up to 20 years. Blue sharks are light-bodied with long pectoral fins. The top of the body is deep blue, lighter on the sides, and the underside is white. The male blue shark commonly grows to 1.82 to 2.82 m (6.0 to 9.3 ft) at maturity, whereas the larger females commonly grow to 2.2 to 3.3 m (7.2 to 11 ft) at maturity. Large specimens can grow to 3.8 m (12 ft) long. Occasionally, an outsized blue shark is reported, with one widely-printed claim of a length of 6.1 m (20 ft), but no shark even approaching this has been confirmed in this species. The Blue Shark is fairly elongated and slender in build and typically weighs from 27 to 55 kg (60 to 120 lb) in males and from 93 to 182 kg (210 to 400 lb) in large females. Occasionally, a female in excess of 3 m (9.8 ft) will weigh over 204 kg (450 lb). The heaviest reported weight for the species was 391 kg (860 lb).

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Vivyx
Apr 18 2018, 05:28 PM
Leopard Seal (male) v Blue Shark (coalition of 3)

(or try a California Sea Lion if the leopard seal is too much)