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Spinosaurus aegyptiacus 27 (41.5%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 38 (58.5%)
Total Votes: 65
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Lion 19 (26%)
Tiger 54 (74%)
Total Votes: 73
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Livyatan melvillei 20 (38.5%)
Carcharocles megalodon 32 (61.5%)
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Cougar 54 (76.1%)
Mackenzie Valley Wolf 17 (23.9%)
Total Votes: 71
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Carcharodontosaurus saharicus 21 (36.2%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 37 (63.8%)
Total Votes: 58
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Cougar 52 (80%)
Haast's Eagle 13 (20%)
Total Votes: 65
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African Lion 64 (86.5%)
Eastern Gorilla Silverback 10 (13.5%)
Total Votes: 74
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Clouded Leopard 49 (70%)
American Pitbull Terrier 21 (30%)
Total Votes: 70
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African Rock Python v Australopithecus afarensis

Posted by Taipan (Admins) at Sep 30 2014, 09:20 PM. 3 comments

African Rock Python - Python sebae
Python sebae, commonly known as the African rock python, is a large, nonvenomous snake of Sub-Saharan Africa. The African rock python is one of seven species in the genus Python. It has two subspecies: one found in Central and Western Africa, the other in Southern Africa. Africa's largest snake, specimens may approach or exceed 6 m (20 ft). The southern subspecies is generally smaller than its northern relative. The animal has a pattern of colored blotches on its body. It has dual lungs and vestigial hind limbs, which show it is less advanced in evolution than other snakes. The snake is found in a variety of habitats, from forests to near deserts, although usually near sources of water. The African rock python kills its prey by constriction and often eats animals up to the size of antelope, occasionally even crocodiles. The snake reproduces by egg-laying. Unlike most snakes, the female will protect her nest and sometimes even her hatchlings. The snake is widely feared even though it only very rarely kills humans. Although the snake is not endangered, it does face threats from habitat reduction and hunting.

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Australopithecus afarensis
A. afarensis existed between 3.9 and 3.0 million years ago. Afarensis had an apelike face with a low forehead, a bony ridge over the eyes, a flat nose, and no chin. They had protruding jaws with large back teeth. Cranial capacity varied from about 375 to 550 cc. The skull is similar to that of a chimpanzee, except for the more humanlike teeth. The canine teeth are much smaller than those of modern apes, but larger and more pointed than those of humans, and shape of the jaw is between the rectangular shape of apes and the parabolic shape of humans. However their pelvis and leg bones far more closely resemble those of modern man, and leave no doubt that they were bipedal (although adapted to walking rather than running (Leakey 1994)). Their bones show that they were physically very strong. Females were substantially smaller than males, a condition known as sexual dimorphism. Height varied between about 107 cm (3'6") and 152 cm (5'0"). The finger and toe bones are curved and proportionally longer than in humans, but the hands are similar to humans in most other details (Johanson and Edey 1981). Most scientists consider this evidence that afarensis was still partially adapted to climbing in trees, others consider it evolutionary baggage.




7574
Sep 29 2014, 09:16 PM
australopithecus afarensis vs african rock python
 

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