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Who wins?
Spinosaurus aegyptiacus 48 (38.1%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 78 (61.9%)
Total Votes: 126
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Who wins?
Lion 31 (22.3%)
Tiger 108 (77.7%)
Total Votes: 139
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Who wins?
Livyatan melvillei 44 (44%)
Carcharocles megalodon 56 (56%)
Total Votes: 100
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Who wins?
Cougar 96 (77.4%)
Mackenzie Valley Wolf 28 (22.6%)
Total Votes: 124
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Who wins?
Carcharodontosaurus saharicus 43 (37.7%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 71 (62.3%)
Total Votes: 114
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Who wins?
Cougar 92 (79.3%)
Haast's Eagle 24 (20.7%)
Total Votes: 116
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Who wins?
African Lion 105 (83.3%)
Eastern Gorilla Silverback 21 (16.7%)
Total Votes: 126
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Who wins?
Clouded Leopard 87 (71.3%)
American Pitbull Terrier 35 (28.7%)
Total Votes: 122
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Carnivora is the premier Animal discussion and debate forum on the internet. Originators of species profiles, we have the most extensive range of animal profiles with the most detailed information that is constantly updated as it becomes available. We were the first forum to include a dedicated interspecific conflict board to allow discussion of hypothetical animal matchups. So please take time to view our site and the range of topics available, and also take the opportunity to become a member of our community.

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European (Common) Rabbit v Weka

Posted by Taipan (Admins) at May 2 2016, 09:57 PM. 10 comments

European (Common) Rabbit - Oryctolagus cuniculus
The European Rabbit or Common Rabbit is a species of rabbit native to south west Europe (Spain and Portugal) and north west Africa (Morocco and Algeria). It has been widely introduced elsewhere, often with devastating effects on local biodiversity. However, its decline in its native range (caused by the diseases myxomatosis and rabbit calicivirus as well as over-hunting and habitat loss) has caused the decline of its highly dependent predators, the Iberian Lynx and the Spanish Imperial Eagle. The European Rabbit is a small, grey-brown mammal ranging from 34–45 cm (13-18 in) in length, and is approximately 1.3-2.2 kg (3-5 lb) in weight. As a lagomorph, it has four sharp incisors (two on top, two on bottom) that grow continuously throughout its life, and two peg teeth on the top behind the incisors, dissimilar to those of rodents (which have only 2 each, top and bottom). Rabbits have long ears, large hind legs, and short, fluffy tails. Rabbits move by hopping, using their long and powerful hind legs. To facilitate quick movement, a rabbit's hind feet have a thick padding of fur to dampen the shock of rapid hopping. Their toes are long, and are webbed to keep from spreading apart as the animal jumps.

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Weka - Gallirallus australis
The weka (also known as Maori hen or woodhen) (Gallirallus australis) is a flightless bird species of the rail family. It is endemic to New Zealand, where four subspecies are recognized. Weka are sturdy brown birds, about the size of a chicken. As omnivores, they feed mainly on invertebrates and fruit. Weka usually lay eggs between August and January; both sexes help to incubate. Weka are large rails. They are predominantly rich brown mottled with black and grey; the brown shade varies from pale to dark depending on subspecies. The male is the larger sex at 50–60 cm (20–24 in) in length and 532–1,605 g (1.173–3.538 lb) in weight. Females measure 46–50 cm (18–20 in) in length and weigh 350–1,035 g (0.772–2.282 lb). The reduced wingspan ranges from 50 to 60 cm (20 to 24 in). The relatively large, reddish-brown beak is about 5 cm (2.0 in) long, stout and tapered, and used as a weapon. The pointed tail is near-constantly being flicked, a sign of unease characteristic of the rail family. Weka have sturdy legs and reduced wings. hey are omnivorous, with a diet comprising 30% animal foods and 70% plant foods. Animal foods include earthworms, larvae, beetles, weta, ants, grass grubs, slugs, snails, insect eggs, slaters, frogs, spiders, rats, mice, and small birds.

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Catboy
Apr 30 2016, 05:34 PM
European Rabbit v Weka
 

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