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Spinosaurus aegyptiacus 38 (39.2%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 59 (60.8%)
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Carcharocles megalodon 47 (59.5%)
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Cougar 78 (78.8%)
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Carcharodontosaurus saharicus 31 (34.4%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 59 (65.6%)
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Cougar 75 (79.8%)
Haast's Eagle 19 (20.2%)
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African Lion 91 (85.8%)
Eastern Gorilla Silverback 15 (14.2%)
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Clouded Leopard 72 (72.7%)
American Pitbull Terrier 27 (27.3%)
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Smilodon gracilis v Deinonychus antirrhopus

Posted by Taipan (Admins) at Jun 30 2015, 06:12 PM. 6 comments

Smilodon gracilis
Smilodon gracilis ("the slender Smilodon") was the smallest and earliest species of the genus Smilodon. It first appeared in the United States about 2.5 million years ago, probably a descendant of Megantereon, and lived until about 500,000 years ago. It lived mainly in the eastern regions of the Americas. Smilodon Gracilis ranged in weight from 120 to 220 lb (55 to 100 kg) and ranged in height from 39 to 47 inches (1 to 1.2 m). Their teeth are about 7 in. Smilodon gracilis was comparable in size to extant jaguars

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Deinonychus antirrhopus
Based on the largest known specimens, Deinonychus could reach 3.4 meters (11.1 ft), with a maximum skull length of 410 mm (16.4 in), a hip height of 0.87 meters (2.85 ft), a maximum weight of 73 kilograms (161 lb). Its skull was equipped with powerful jaws lined with around sixty curved, blade-like teeth. Studies of the skull have progressed a great deal over the decades. Ostrom reconstructed the partial, imperfectly preserved, skulls that he had as triangular, broad, and fairly similar to Allosaurus. Additional Deinonychus skull material and closely related species found with good 3D preservation show that the palate was more vaulted than Ostrom thought, making the snout far narrower, while the jugals flared broadly, giving greater stereoscopic vision. The skull of Deinonychus was different from that of Velociraptor, however, in that it had a more robust skull roof like that of Dromaeosaurus, and did not have the depressed nasals of Velociraptor. Both the skull and the lower jaw had fenestrae (skull openings) which reduced the weight of the skull. In Deinonychus, the antorbital fenestra, a skull opening between the eye and nostril, was particularly large.

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Inhumanum Rapax
Jun 30 2015, 03:35 PM
Smilodon gracilis vs Deinonychus antirrhopus
 

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