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Total Forum Posts: 345,403
Total Members: 3,205 (The newest member is KeeganKuhn)
Apr 4 2013, 02:53 AM, a record 641 users were online.

Polls

Who wins?
Spinosaurus aegyptiacus 49 (37.4%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 82 (62.6%)
Total Votes: 131
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Who wins?
Lion 32 (22.4%)
Tiger 111 (77.6%)
Total Votes: 143
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Who wins?
Livyatan melvillei 44 (43.1%)
Carcharocles megalodon 58 (56.9%)
Total Votes: 102
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Who wins?
Cougar 98 (77.8%)
Mackenzie Valley Wolf 28 (22.2%)
Total Votes: 126
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Who wins?
Carcharodontosaurus saharicus 44 (38.3%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 71 (61.7%)
Total Votes: 115
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Who wins?
Cougar 92 (78.6%)
Haast's Eagle 25 (21.4%)
Total Votes: 117
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Who wins?
African Lion 107 (83.6%)
Eastern Gorilla Silverback 21 (16.4%)
Total Votes: 128
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Who wins?
Clouded Leopard 90 (72%)
American Pitbull Terrier 35 (28%)
Total Votes: 125
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Carnivora

Welcome to Carnivora!

Carnivora is the premier Animal discussion and debate forum on the internet. Originators of species profiles, we have the most extensive range of animal profiles with the most detailed information that is constantly updated as it becomes available. We were the first forum to include a dedicated interspecific conflict board to allow discussion of hypothetical animal matchups. So please take time to view our site and the range of topics available, and also take the opportunity to become a member of our community.

Pic Of Week


Harbour Seal vs Giant Pacific Octopus

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Indian (Common) Gray Mongoose v American Mink

Posted by Taipan (Admins) at Yesterday, 10:16 PM. One comment

Indian (Common) Gray Mongoose - Herpestes edwardsii
The Indian gray mongoose or common grey mongoose (Herpestes edwardsii) is a species of mongoose mainly found in southern Asia mainly India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka and some other parts of Asia. The gray mongoose is commonly found in open forests, scrublands and cultivated fields, often close to human habitation. It lives in burrows, hedgerows and thickets, among groves of trees, taking shelter under rocks or bushes and even in drains. It is very bold and inquisitive but wary, seldom venturing far from cover. It climbs well. Usually found singly or in pairs. It preys on rodents, snakes, birds’ eggs and hatchlings, lizards and variety of invertebrates. Along the Chambal River it occasionally feeds on gharial eggs. It breeds throughout the year. The Indian grey mongoose, or common grey mongoose, is a medium sized tawny or yellowish grey with a lighter underside, darker feet (this separates it from the syntopic Small Asian Mongoose), and dark red tail tip. They have a reddish tint to their heads. Their tail length equals their body length. Body length: 14-17 inches (36-45cm) Tail length: 17 inches (45 cm), weight: 2-4 lb. (0.89-1.7kg). Males are significantly larger than the females. Mongooses can see colors, unlike most mammals, which have only partial color vision.

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American Mink - Mustela vison
The American mink (Neovison vison) is a semi-aquatic species of Mustelid native to North America, though human intervention has expanded its range to many parts of Europe and South America. The American mink differs from members of the genus Mustela (stoats and weasels) by its larger size and stouter form, which closely approaches that of martens. It shares with martens a uniformly enlarged, bushy and somewhat tapering tail, rather than a slenderly terete tail with an enlarged bushy tip, as is the case in stoats. Males measure 13–18 inches (34–45 cm) in body length, while females measure 12–15 inches (31–37.5 cm). The tail measures 6–10 inches (15.6–24.7 cm) in males and 6–8 inches (14.8–21.5 cm) in females. Weight varies with sex and season, with males being heavier than females. In winter, males weigh 1–3 pounds (500–1,580 g) and females 1–2 pounds (400–780 g) Maximum heaviness occurs in autumn.

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AiM4
May 29 2016, 07:14 PM
American mink vs yellow mongoose


Had to make it a larger mongoose!
 

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