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Who wins?
Titan Triggerfish 9 (90%)
Wolf Cichlid 1 (10%)
Total Votes: 10
Titan Triggerfish v Wolf Cichlid
Topic Started: Aug 3 2014, 05:55 PM (2,408 Views)
Taipan
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Titan Triggerfish - Balistoides viridescens
The titan triggerfish, giant triggerfish or moustache triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) is a large species of triggerfish found in lagoons and at reefs to depths of 50 m (160 ft) in most of the Indo-Pacific, though it is absent from Hawaii. With a length of up to 75 centimetres (30 in), it is the largest species of triggerfish in its range (the stone triggerfish, Pseudobalistes naufragium, from the east Pacific is larger). The titan triggerfish is diurnal and solitary. It feeds on sea urchins, molluscs, crustaceans, tube worms and coral. It often feeds by turning over rocks, stirring up sand and biting off pieces of branching coral. This is why other smaller fish species are often seen around it, as they feed on the detritus and smaller organisms that are stirred up. Titan triggerfish have been observed being aggressive to other fish who enter their territory.

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Wolf Cichlid - Parachromis dovii
Parachromis dovii, the Guapote, is a species of cichlid native to Central America where it occurs on both slopes of Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. This species grows to a length of 72 centimetres (28 in) TL. This carnivorous species is important to local commercial fisheries and is sought after as a gamefish. This species is known as the Wolf cichlid in the aquarium trade.

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1.0reef
Aug 3 2014, 03:01 PM
Titan Triggerfish vs a large Cichlid (Possibly Wolf) in environment where they can both thrive (Even though that doesn't exist)
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Deleted User
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I'm not an expert on fish, so I wait for others to post.
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1.0reef
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Thanks Taipan! Because the water salinity would allow both fish to thrive, it won't affect either one. With that being said, I think the Triggerfish will win a majority of the time due to it's incredibly powerful mouth (Known to take chunks of diver's feet) , aggressive nature (Known to attack divers and large fish) , and powerful build.
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Vivyx
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this is a deleted post
Edited by Vivyx, Mar 21 2017, 07:40 AM.
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Grimace
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If the triggerfish is properly motivated, it wins 100%.

Cichlids like to fight by lip locking. Attempting to do that with a triggerfish would involve the wolf cichlid having its jaw torn off.
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retic
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i'm not very familiar with either animal. for now i'll go with everyone else's opinion and say the triggerfish will win.
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igano
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Triggerfish 10/10. Their mouth and aggressiveness is amazing. Cichlids are very agressive too but lacks the mouth to inflict big damage fast.
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Birdsofprey123
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igano
Aug 31 2014, 05:43 AM
Triggerfish 10/10. Their mouth and aggressiveness is amazing. Cichlids are very agressive too but lacks the mouth to inflict big damage fast.
i know this thread has died a LONG time ago but i would have to disagree with you there. doviis (wolf cichlids) have very muscular bodies and they've got the weaponry to inflict massive damage. their jaws are not only impressive but with 10-15mm teeth when full grown are not anything to joke about, hence their name wolf cichlid.
the dovii imo would be the aggressor here, it takes this.
Edited by Birdsofprey123, Mar 20 2017, 09:11 AM.
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Grimace
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Birdsofprey123
Mar 20 2017, 09:08 AM
igano
Aug 31 2014, 05:43 AM
Triggerfish 10/10. Their mouth and aggressiveness is amazing. Cichlids are very agressive too but lacks the mouth to inflict big damage fast.
i know this thread has died a LONG time ago but i would have to disagree with you there. doviis (wolf cichlids) have very muscular bodies and they've got the weaponry to inflict massive damage. their jaws are not only impressive but with 10-15mm teeth when full grown are not anything to joke about, hence their name wolf cichlid.
the dovii imo would be the aggressor here, it takes this.
Triggerfish jaws are on an entirely different level than -any- cichlid.
Big triggers can chomp through coral like it is absolutely nothing.

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vs
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Fastlane
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If anyone here has ever tried to filet or clean any species of triggerfish, they would know that it's like trying to cut through a very tough piece of leather. I've never experienced the kind of difficulty in getting through a fish's skin as I have with a triggerfish. It's much tougher than even heavily scaled fish. So, on top of the biting/jaw advantage, they are better protected as well.
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Grimace
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Fastlane
Mar 20 2017, 04:46 PM
If anyone here has ever tried to filet or clean any species of triggerfish, they would know that it's like trying to cut through a very tough piece of leather. I've never experienced the kind of difficulty in getting through a fish's skin as I have with a triggerfish. It's much tougher than even heavily scaled fish. So, on top of the biting/jaw advantage, they are better protected as well.
Yeah, triggers are no joke, especially when they are really determined to hurt something.
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Vivyx
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There is absolutely no way a wolf cichlid could kill a titan triggerfish. I have been bitten by a triggerfish much smaller than a titan and I can tell you that the bite was incredibly painful; their teeth are made for biting through very tough organisms including coral and urchins. I don't even think that the cichlid would be the aggressor here; the titan triggerfish is incredibly aggressive, and are known for attacking larger fish and even divers who come close to their territory (as well as amputating toes and fingers). The very fact that the triggerfish is also incredibly well-protected would probably mean that the cichlid wouldn't be able to deal out significant damage towards the trigger's body, and would resort to lip-locking as cichlids like to fight.... not a good idea for the cichlid. I honestly think this is a mismatch.
I think it should be worth noting that triggerfish don't just bite, but they can also ram; they have been known to ram at divers as well as bite them.
Edited by Vivyx, Mar 25 2017, 07:09 AM.
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Vivyx
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Just to emphasize on the kind of damage that triggerfish can inflict with their bite:

Spoiler: click to toggle


I'm still convinced that the wolf cichlid stands no chance of winning here. I'm trying to think of a better opponent to put up against a titan triggerfish, but I'm not too sure which opponent would be most suitable. Does anybody have any possible ideas?
Edited by Vivyx, Mar 28 2017, 01:41 AM.
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Ceph
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Reasonable Candidates

Osteichthyes

  • Cephalopholis argus
  • Sphyraena acutipinnis
  • Lutjanus analis
  • Scorpaena plumieri
  • Gymnothorax favagineus


Chondrichthyes

  • Squalus acanthias
  • Scyliorhinus retifer
  • Dasyatis sabina(or similar)


Others

  • Homarus americanus
  • Eunice aphroditois
  • Sepia apama
  • Octopus vulgaris
  • Hydrophis spiralis


I'm sure there are others.
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Vivyx
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I think that the idea of a Titan Triggerfish v American Lobster match-up actually passed my mind once, but I have a tendency to lose memory of certain match-ups for a while (probably because I have a lot of them on my mind already). It does sound very interesting, though.

Triggerfish v seasnake match-up could be potentially interesting, as well as triggerfish v grouper and triggerfish v dogfish/catshark.

I generally think that octopi and squid are dominant over similarly-sized fish (there are cases where vice versa is possible, though; morays, barracuda and sharks are all good examples of fish that can be very dangerous opponents towards squid and octopi).

I honestly have no idea on how well a triggerfish would fare against a stingray...

I think that a moray would be too much for a triggerfish, as well as the scorpionfish (although I have heard that triggerfish might aggressively kill lionfish in some aquariums).
Edited by Vivyx, Mar 26 2017, 05:52 AM.
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