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Rethinking that Leopards can beat Hyenas..can they really?
Topic Started: Aug 23 2014, 12:50 AM (9,883 Views)
HyperNova
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I have yet to see a 300 pounds leopard that is not fat.
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SETA222
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Quote:
 
I have yet to see a 300 pounds leopard that is not fat.

It's funny because he firstly said the leopard in the zoo was 110 KG, then 120 KG, then he sent me a PM telling me that the leopard was in fact not muscular ( how can I post the message here?) and now he says this. And I really doubt on that weight, I saw the pic and that leopard definitely doesn't weigh 120 KG. It's very obvious that he is lying.
By the way KingPanthera, you really like the hyenas right?

Quote:
 
What are you even talking about? my 2 favorite species are the hyenas BUT
i'd favor the leopard vs hyena... even if this leopard is smaller
a lioness vs a 80 kg leopard is a mismatch for the lioness
a 110 kg leopard vs 110 kg lioness even a faster battle

( http://carnivoraforum.com/topic/9870501/9/#post10011123 )

KingPanthera
 
Non of your doggies or cat like ugly dogs will be able to do this.

lol

Quote:
 
But a leopard killing and lifting up a tree a bull eland
Is
Freakin
Awesome

rolleyes

Quote:
 
A leopard will knock a tiger attack and will be able to make a draw with a male tiger. Thats it.

Again, because you seem to ignore reality:


"CHANDRAPUR: A fully grown male adult leopard was killed by a tiger reportedly in a territorial dispute under Bhadrawati forest range.
According to a press release issued here today by the forest department, the incident came to notice when one of the forest guards was on patrol in Kachrala beat under Bhadrawati forest range yesterday at about 4.30 pm.
On noticing the leopard's dead body in compartment number 204 under the Kachrala beat, pugmarks of a tiger were located around the spot.
It was also observed that the leopard's body had injuries and deep scars on its back, caused by tiger claws.
However, all body parts of the leopard including its claws, whiskers, canines and skin were intact.
Chief Conservator of Forests (Chandrapur Division) Sanjay Thakre, divisional forest officer S S Patil, Honorary Wildlife Warden Bandu Dhotre and others were present when the post mortem was conducted by a veterinary doctor at the spot.
Later, the leopard's body was cremated as per formalities, the press release stated.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/environment/flora-fauna/Tiger-kills-leopard-in-Karnatakas-Bhadrawati-forest-range/articleshow/44860079.cms

"A tiger killed a leopard and its half-eaten carcass was found near a tea estate at Hulikal near Coonoor, about 20 kilometers from here today.

The estate workers found the carcass and informed forest department officials, who rushed to the spot with a veterinarian, Dr P Parthasarathy, and recovered it.



The veterinarian said it was difficult to identify the gender of the animal since there was only skin, bones and some flesh left and suspected it might have been killed about three days back.

However,it was clear the animal was killed and devoured by a tiger, whose pug marks were found in the vicinity, Parthasarathy said.

http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/tiger-kills-leopard-eats-it-115032900619_1.html

"LUCKNOW: The shrinking forest cover has brought even tigers and leopards face to face within protected areas. The law of the jungle maintains that if a Leopard trespasses onto a tiger's territory then it gets killed. That is what happened on Sunday when a leopard entered into the territory of the tiger and was killed by the latter, in North Kheri forest division.

The leopard was an adult and the pugmarks of the tiger around its body confirm that the leopard died while fighting with the tiger. According to KK Singh, divisional forest officer, North Kheri, the leopard could have been killed by the tiger when it trespassed on its territory.

The body of the leopard was found lying in Matehi village area of North Kheri on Sunday. The body was brought to Dhaurara range of the division for the post-mortem and further investigation. However, the tiger did not eat the leopard.

North kheri is almost adjacent to Nishangadha range of Katarniaghat division. Katarniaghat has a good population of leopards which keeps visiting North Kheri region.

The tussle between the tigers and leopards can also be explained in terms of the declining prey base. Both the big cats depend on wild boars and blue bulls for the diet but the forests are slowly getting devoid of these animals. The leopard was a victim of this battle for supremacy.
"
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/lucknow/Tiger-kills-leopard-for-intruding-into-its-territory/articleshow/3905476.cms?referral=PM

"Leopard and Tiger Interactions at Royal Chitwan National Park


"Dr. Charles McDougal is one of the world's most dedicated tiger researchers and prime advocates of their conservation. He gained his PhD in anthropology, but since 1961 has spent most of his time in tiger country in Nepal and India. Since 1972 he has been Director of Wildlife Activities at Tiger Tops Jungle Lodge in Royal Chitwan National Park. At present he is writing a new book about his long-term tiger studies. His article "Leopard and Tiger Interactions at Royal Chitwan National Park, Nepal" was first published in 1988 and is presented here unabridged.

Earlier studies in and adjacent to the park found evidence of high leopard mortality. Suitable habitat was not occupied for extended periods, suggesting that the population was experiencing difficulty replacing itself. Under certain conditions leopards succeed in co-existing with tigers, the former being socially subordinate to the latter. Nevertheless, leopards are not common in habitat where tiger density is high. They are most prevalent on the peripheries of the park, sandwiched between prime tiger habitat, on the one side, and cultivated village land on the other, dependant on both natural prey and domestic livestock. Tigers as well as humans contribute to leopard mortality.

During a period of 21 months, six leopard deaths were recorded. Although all occurred within 7 sqkm, this does not represent the total area the leopards had used. Five were killed by tigers; the cause of death in the sixth case is unknown. In April 1986 the remains of a subadult male, estimated to be 18 months old, were discovered in Sal forest at the foot of some hills. Wounds indicated that it had been killed by a tiger, the tracks of which were discovered nearby. Two months later, the decomposed carcass of a large leopard, presumed to be a male, was discovered in nearby riverine habitat; it was not possible to ascertain the cause of death.

Ten months after the first leopard had been killed, a female leopard and her two small cubs were walking along a path through grassland near the Rapti River, on the edge of the park, when they were encountered by a tigress. The latter killed the mother leopard, dragged her body 75 metres, and devoured everything except the head and front paws. The two cubs escaped but returned the next night, when the tigress found and killed them not far from where she had fed on their mother. The leopard cubs were discovered seven metres apart, where they had been dragged in opposite directions by the two small (six months old) cubs of the tigress. (TIGRESS WITH CUBS KILLS LEOPARDESS WITH CUBS)

The skulls of both, one a male and the other a female, weighing 5.7 and 5.2 kilograms respectively, had been crushed; their bodies were intact except for about half a kilogram of flesh which had been eaten from the hindquarters of each by the tiger cubs; the tail of one was also missing.

During the next 11 months, when the resident female was not replaced, a large male leopard intermittently used the area. In January 1988 his 4-5 day old remains were discovered in a patch of partially burnt grass. Canine punctures at the nape of the neck, the vertebrate of which were shattered, as well as wounds on the back left no doubt that he had been killed by a tiger, most probably an adult female. (LARGE MALE LEOPARD KILLED BY TIGRESS)

Two factors appear to have a bearing on the extermination of so many leopards by tigers in one area during a short period of time. First, subsequent to the establishment of the park in 1973 effective protection and good management have led to an increase in the prey base and a commensurate rise in tiger density. In a tract of western Chitwan of just under 100 sqkm, including the smaller area where leopard mortality was recorded, the number of resident breeding adult tigers doubled from four to eight in the 11 years 1976-87. Secondly in this sector, very little peripheral habitat remains available for leopards. As human pressure inside the park has been largely eliminated by protection, it has increased outside, with consequent clearing of adjacent forest and scrubland. Now prime tiger habitat on one side of the Rapti River, the park boundary, faces open terrain with little cover on the other. These factors would increase the likelihood of confrontation between tigers and leopards."

Posted Image
Posted Image
(Sorry for the images being big, but if I resized them no one would be able to read)
Edited by SETA222, Dec 4 2016, 07:27 AM.
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HyperNova
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SETA222
 
It's funny because he firstly said the leopard in the zoo was 110 KG, then 120 KG, then he sent me a PM telling me that the leopard was in fact not muscular ( how can I post the message here?)

I think the only ways to do this is to copy past the pm or making a screenshot of it and then posting it in this thread but you should ask him before doing this, it's can be disrespectful otherwise.
SETA222
 
and now he says this. And I really doubt on that weight, I saw the pic and that leopard definitely doesn't weigh 120 KG. It's very obvious that he is lying.

Can I saw the picture?
Edited by HyperNova, Dec 4 2016, 10:12 AM.
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SETA222
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Quote:
 
I think the only ways to do this is to copy past the pm or making a screenshot of it and then posting it in this thread but you should ask him before doing this, it's disrespectful otherwise.

Oh.

Quote:
 
Can I saw the picture?

He posted here but Taipan deleted his post, here it is:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BLTcUKIBJ_J/
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ImperialDino
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KingPanthera
Dec 4 2016, 05:32 AM
ImperialDino
Dec 3 2016, 11:00 AM
KingPanthera
Nov 26 2016, 06:39 PM
at pairty the tiger is around the srength of a puma! yes i said that!
the leopard is the strongest pound to pound of all the big cats!!
thats one small ass leopard in that video a 70 kg leopards ar known to defend and knock off tiger attacks
http://www.allempires.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=35256
so they around the same strengh okay???
This "parity" stuff is kind of silly...trying to compare a 500 pound cat to a 150 pound cat.
Ohhh the leopard hater himself.
Leopards CAN weigh up to 300 pounds on total
A leopard in our city zoo is 120 kg and he is not fat.
Not all tigers are 200 kg. Sprcific bengals avrege like that.
A leopard will knock a tiger attack and will be able to make a draw with a male tiger. Thats it.
I love tigers. A really impressive cat.
But a leopard killing and lifting up a tree a bull eland
Is
Freakin
Awesome
Non of your doggies or cat like ugly dogs will be able to do this.
KingTroll...you've never seen a 300 pound Leopard bud.
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LeopardNimr
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ImperialDino
Dec 7 2016, 09:30 PM
KingPanthera
Dec 4 2016, 05:32 AM
ImperialDino
Dec 3 2016, 11:00 AM
Ohhh the leopard hater himself.
Leopards CAN weigh up to 300 pounds on total
A leopard in our city zoo is 120 kg and he is not fat.
Not all tigers are 200 kg. Sprcific bengals avrege like that.
A leopard will knock a tiger attack and will be able to make a draw with a male tiger. Thats it.
I love tigers. A really impressive cat.
But a leopard killing and lifting up a tree a bull eland
Is
Freakin
Awesome
Non of your doggies or cat like ugly dogs will be able to do this.
KingTroll...you've never seen a 300 pound Leopard bud.
i have seen 250 pounds
good enough?
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animalkingdom
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But i do believe that hyena could have hold on its own against that male leopard,in my opinion i would put my money on hyena in face to face fight against leopard.
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Grazier
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There's a reason a forfeit counts as a loss in fighting, it's because otherwise you can just forfeit every fight until you're sure you're gonna win and then fabricate a perfect unbeaten record.

That's exactly what the leopard has done with the hyena. Of course it "can" beat a hyena, potentially, it has done a few times, but it's not more likely to win, it loses all the time, nearly every time, by forfeit, the most shameful of all ways to lose. Lol, now I'm trolling a little, but seriously the way I see it a forfeit has to be notched up as a loss, you can't reward cherry picking matches with a clean record.
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animalkingdom
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Quote:
 
There's a reason a forfeit counts as a loss in fighting, it's because otherwise you can just forfeit every fight until you're sure you're gonna win and then fabricate a perfect unbeaten record.

That's exactly what the leopard has done with the hyena. Of course it "can" beat a hyena, potentially, it has done a few times, but it's not more likely to win, it loses all the time, nearly every time, by forfeit, the most shameful of all ways to lose. Lol, now I'm trolling a little, but seriously the way I see it a forfeit has to be notched up as a loss, you can't reward cherry picking matches with a clean record.


^Completely agree.
Edited by animalkingdom, Jan 11 2017, 10:40 PM.
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Siegfried
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This probably is analogous to the relationship between Siberian tigers and brown bears. Hunting another species is different than fighting one. The ability of cats to be stealthy is paramount to their success. Sometimes the fight just isn't worth it.
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ImperialDino
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Siegfried
Jan 12 2017, 08:58 AM
This probably is analogous to the relationship between Siberian tigers and brown bears. Hunting another species is different than fighting one. The ability of cats to be stealthy is paramount to their success. Sometimes the fight just isn't worth it.
A leopard cant sneak up on a hyena and kill it..i've seen footage of Leopards sneaking up on hyenas..then the hyena realizes its a leopard and chases it off lol
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Grazier
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ImperialDino
Jan 13 2017, 09:12 PM
Siegfried
Jan 12 2017, 08:58 AM
This probably is analogous to the relationship between Siberian tigers and brown bears. Hunting another species is different than fighting one. The ability of cats to be stealthy is paramount to their success. Sometimes the fight just isn't worth it.
A leopard cant sneak up on a hyena and kill it..i've seen footage of Leopards sneaking up on hyenas..then the hyena realizes its a leopard and chases it off lol
That aligns with what I've seen too. I mean I'm not saying a leopard can't ambush a hyena, just that face to face hyenas don't hesitate to go for them and leopards don't hesitate to run away.
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Ceratodromeus
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Neither do solitary spotted hyenas. It goes either way, we have an entire thread dedicated to that.
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Grazier
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Actually all the cases that spring to my mind were all solitary hyenas. I don't think hyena packs are quiet enough to surprise a leopard, I think they're probably gone before a clan of hyenas gets within a kilometre. Hyenas scout around solo a lot, more than they travel in groups, most hyenas leopards see are by themselves and the leopards give these solo hyenas a wide berth.
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Ceratodromeus
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10 pages for you to read up on, spotted hyenas will get brave enough to take the kill of a leopard on occasion but they have more sucess with numbers.
http://carnivoraforum.com/topic/9540991/1/
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