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Who wins?
Indochinese Tiger 9 (45%)
Asian (Water) Buffalo 11 (55%)
Total Votes: 20
Indochinese Tiger v Asian (Water) Buffalo
Topic Started: Jan 5 2015, 10:52 PM (4,464 Views)
Taipan
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Indochinese Tiger - Panthera tigris corbetti
The Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) is a tiger subspecies found in Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and southwestern China that has been classified as endangered by IUCN. Its status is poorly known but the extent of its recent decline is serious, approaching the threshold for critically endangered. Panthera tigris corbetti, also called Corbett's tiger, was named in honour of Jim Corbett. Male Indochinese tigers measure 2.55 to 2.85 metres (8.37 to 9.35 ft) in length, weigh 150 to 195 kilograms (330 to 430 lb); the skull measures between 319 to 365 millimetres (13 to 14 in) in length. The average male Indochinese tiger is approximately 2.74 m (9 ft) long and weighs about 181 kg (400 lb). Large individuals can weigh up to 227 kg (500 lb). Female Indochinese tigers measure 2.30 to 2.55 m (7.55 to 8.37 ft) in length, weigh 100 to 130 kg (221 to 287 lb), with a skull length of 275 to 311 mm (11 to 12 in). The average female Indochinese tiger is approximately 2.44 m (8 ft) in length and weighs about 115 kg (253 lb). Indochinese tigers live in secluded forests in hilly to mountainous terrain, the majority of which lies along the borders between countries. Entrance to these areas is frequently restricted and as of late biologists have been granted limited permits for field surveys. For this reason, comparatively little is known about the status of these big cats in the wild. Mother tigers give birth to two or three cubs at a time.Indochinese tigers prey mainly on medium- and large-sized wild ungulates. Sambar deer, wild pigs, serow, and large bovids such as banteng and juvenile gaur comprise the majority of Indochinese tiger’s diet. However, in most of Southeast Asia large animal populations have been seriously depleted because of illegal hunting, resulting in the so-called “empty forest syndrome” – i.e. a forest that looks intact, but where most wildlife has been eliminated. Some species, such as the kouprey and Schomburgk's Deer, are extinct, and Eld's Deer, hog deer and wild water buffalo are present only in a few relict populations. In such habitats tigers are forced to subsist on smaller prey, such as muntjac deer, porcupines, macaques and hog badgers. Small prey by itself is barely sufficient to meet the energy requirements of a large carnivore such as the tiger, and is insufficient for tiger reproduction. This factor, in combination with direct tiger poaching for traditional Chinese medicine, is the main contributor in the collapse of the Indochinese tiger throughout its range.

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Asian (Water) Buffalo - Bubalus arnee
The water buffalo or domestic Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is a large bovine animal, frequently used as livestock in the Indian Subcontinent, and also widely in South America, southern Europe, the Middle East, northern Africa, and elsewhere. Adult water buffalo range in size from 400 to 900 kg (880 to 2,000 lb) for the domestic breeds, while the wild animals are nearly 3 m (9.8 ft) long and 2 m (6.6 ft) tall, weighing up to 1,200 kg (2,600 lb); females are about two-thirds this size. River buffalo are usually black, have curled horns, and are native to the western half of Asia, whereas swamp buffalo can be black, white or both, with long, gently curved, swept-back horns; they are native to the eastern half of Asia from India to Taiwan. The largest recorded horns are just under two metres long.

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maker
Jan 5 2015, 04:08 PM
Tiger vs water buffalo
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7574
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well bovid is much larger but not good fighter compra guar and tiger is very good grapper
me think tiger can kill buffalo in predation scenario
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Vodmeister
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The Indochinese tiger isn't large enough. A Bengal tiger would've stood a 50/50 chance against a water buffalo, but an Indochinese one is too small.
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VenomousDragon
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Need a superior macro predator, like the ora.
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Amur
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7574
Jan 5 2015, 11:03 PM
well bovid is much larger but not good fighter compra guar and tiger is very good grapper
me think tiger can kill buffalo in predation scenario
Asian Buffalo are much more dangerous than Gaur as prey .
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Ausar
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Vodmeister
Jan 6 2015, 10:06 AM
The Indochinese tiger isn't large enough. A Bengal tiger would've stood a 50/50 chance against a water buffalo, but an Indochinese one is too small.
I was sort of surprised to see you favor the water buffalo (because I thought, "~181kg tiger vs. ~400-900kg buffalo, not that bad")...but then I read the OP more thoroughly and found that ~400-900kg was for domestic water buffalo, wild ones are apparently ~1.2t (though I don't usually trust the OP). Haha.

Anyway, I agree with you.
Edited by Ausar, Jan 6 2015, 12:10 PM.
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Inhumanum Rapax
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JackLumber
Jan 6 2015, 10:12 AM
Need a superior macro predator, like the ora.


Anyways I favor the water buffalo for reasons stated.
Edited by Taipan, Jan 6 2015, 01:41 PM.
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Deleted User
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The tiger is too small
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maker
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50% for this fight, agreed a Komodo dragon would win more often.
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Tiger
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Size is not relevant, a tiger is big enough to win this fight otherwise Taipan would've made it a Siberian, Bengal or Caspian tiger anyway a few lbs don't change the outcome.
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The All-seeing Night
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Tiger
Jan 7 2015, 08:47 AM
Size is not relevant, a tiger is big enough to win this fight otherwise Taipan would've made it a Siberian, Bengal or Caspian tiger anyway a few lbs don't change the outcome.
If you consider 400 lbs vs 2,600 lbs difference to be irrelevant.
Edited by The All-seeing Night, Jan 7 2015, 09:52 AM.
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Tiger
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I meant between the tiger sub species.
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Full Throttle
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For what it's worth Banteng are listed as prey for this subspecies, though the age gender of these is not listed.
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Taipan
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Tiger
Jan 7 2015, 08:47 AM
Size is not relevant, a tiger is big enough to win this fight otherwise Taipan would've made it a Siberian, Bengal or Caspian tiger anyway a few lbs don't change the outcome.


The main reason I made it Indochinese is that virtually every Tiger v Bovid thread involves the Bengal. Indochinese Tigers & Asian Water Buffalo do interact also.

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Ceratodromeus
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need a bigger tiger.
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