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LGD and sheepdog interaction with large carnivore accounts; And any good comparisons if you'd like
Topic Started: Jan 18 2015, 12:45 AM (10,177 Views)
kingkazma
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Cougar kills dog in Gypsum
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"Bubba" was killed by a mountain lion outside Tara Haymond's back door in Gypsum around 2 a.m. Sunday. The dog was about 150 pounds and "abnormally large for a Great Pyrenees," Haymond said.


GYPSUM, Colorado - Tara Haymond woke up at 2 a.m. Sunday to the sound of Bubba, her 150-pound Great Pyrenees dog, crying.

"I thought I better tell him to be quiet so he wouldn't bother the neighbor," she said.

She opened the sliding door next to the bed and discovered a mountain lion on top of Bubba.

"There is nothing in anybody that would prepare them to find that," she said.

The 47-year-old grabbed a shotgun but couldn't find ammunition, so she started hitting the cougar with the gun.

"The cat didn't even flinch," she said. "Then I realized the cat might hurt me so I stopped. I guess I might be lucky in that way."

Her husband was home and she also called a neighbor and Eagle County Sheriff's deputies to the scene, which is near the Sky Legend neighborhood at Gypsum's Cotton Ranch development.

The cougar was still on the dog when they arrived and didn't move until the sheriff fired on it several times, Haymond said.

Bubba was still suffering, however, so the sheriff put him down as well at the owners' request.

The deputy was unavailable for comment.

According to John Grove with the Colorado Division of Wildlife, the mountain lion was young - about nine months to a year old - and it was very skinny. Probably it was sick or starving or both, which could result in such atypical behavior as attacking an animal in a populated area. Since this was an anomaly, residents shouldn't be overly worried about any more "aggressive" animals in the area, Grove said.

The town of Gypsum is encouraging residents to be alert for future mountain lion encounters.

The large cats are considered to be nocturnal animals, so it is ideal for dogs, house cats and other domestic animals to be brought inside from dusk until dawn. Additionally, small children should not be left alone outside after dark and should not be left to play outside in more remote areas at any time.

Though the number of mountain lion/human interactions has increased in recent years, the number of fatal attacks on humans remains very small. There have been less than two dozen fatal attacks in the last 100 years. Most of the attacks were by young lions, forced to hunt on their own. Young mountain lions may key in on easy prey, such as pets and small children. They can be attracted to pet food and trash left outside, especially in cold temperatures.

Haymond feels that residents in her area should've been more vigilant about alerting each other to possible danger.

"A little advance notice could've prevented this," she said. "I believe it's really important that neighbors tell each other when they see a cougar in their driveway. People had known the cat was around and didn't say anything. There are kids in the area. Fortunately this [victim] was a four-legged kid and not a two-legged one. If I had known I might've had a round in my shotgun."

Haymond is also appreciative of the neighborhood's show of love for her dog, which she described as sweet and shy.

"Everyone - the whole neighborhood - happened to show up at just the right time and we buried him," she said.

Besides Bubba, Haymond and her husband also have three dogs and three cats, but the third cat has been missing for a few days.

Haymond expressed despair.

"I felt hopeless when I couldn't find any bullets, utterly hopeless," she said. "And I still feel hopeless."

http://www.vaildaily.com/article/20091229/NEWS/912289953

Edited by Taipan, Nov 1 2015, 01:25 PM.
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Siegfried
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A big (enough) cat could take down ANY dog. The large domestic dogs pictured were most likely killed and consumed by multiple wolves. Clearly 2 domestic dogs killed the wolf in the video in post #2. It seems to come down to numbers in these canid encounters.
Edited by Siegfried, Feb 20 2015, 08:56 PM.
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Jiggly Mimus
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Well I would like to know since I haven't had any input, but how well do you think my 140-150 German would do against a cat. I mean would it keep it at bay and if not could it hold its own against a cougar.
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maker
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This:
http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Aggressive-Mountain-Lion-Attack-Fontana-248603131.html#
Jiggly Haydeni
Feb 25 2015, 04:57 AM
but how well do you think my 140-150 German would do against a cat.
Anything under 40 kg, it would do well, but gets serous injuries from a 40 kg cat, but a 55 kg+ cougar or leopard would be too much, and for healthy cheetahs, they definitely will flee from a large canid if they flee from smaller African wild dogs and even jackals.
Edited by maker, Feb 25 2015, 06:53 AM.
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Jiggly Mimus
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Thanks that is super reassuring.
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Siegfried
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By "140-150 German," I assume you mean a 140-150 pound German Shepherd dog (GSD). The breed standard for a GSD is about 95 pounds if I am not mistaken, but I realize that there are GSD's out there that are larger than the standard. A GSD of that size is a mutant however. I bet he's awesome. I would love to see a photo of him. Anyway, he might be able to dominate a smaller cougar or leopard (80-100 pounds) as long as the cat didn't get the jump on him. That element of surprise is utmost important for cats vs dogs of similar size. Cats are sometimes a bit skiddish. As lone predators, maintaining their own ability to hunt seems to weigh in on its decision making. A well developed self-preservation thing. If it gets hurt, it's in trouble and knows it. They seem more calculating than dogs. If a quick throat hold isn't secured a cat might take off and hunt again later. Cats almost appear to conduct a risk/reward analysis when hunting. In general... cats while curious, don't really want to confront another animal unless it is to eat it. I don't think ANY dog beats a cat of 120+ pounds if the cat is intent on eating and the dog isn't smart enough to run for its life and get away. IMHO.
Edited by Siegfried, Feb 26 2015, 09:11 PM.
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Jiggly Mimus
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I think he would do the wise thing to do but you never know with dogs...
P.S. I would love to post him i just don't know how but I will still try.
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kingkazma
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nah a 150 pound lgd/wolfdog/akita/bandog/working molosser would wreck a 120 pound cougar/leopard. be realistic guys.
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Jiggly Mimus
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Can't tell if that is sarcasm or nah...
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kingkazma
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no
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Jiggly Mimus
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What do you think about a shepherd then.
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kingkazma
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vs a cougar??? you'll need a ddd, czech, hybrid, or other cross.
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Inhumanum Rapax
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kingkazma
Mar 1 2015, 09:38 AM
nah a 150 pound lgd/wolfdog/akita/bandog/working molosser would wreck a 120 pound cougar/leopard. be realistic guys.
Maybe in a face to face fight (I personally don't know or want to discuss that here) but that's not how most felids operate, almost all of the time it's going to be through ambush.
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kingkazma
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yeah but if the dog can smell the cat or through it off it should be fine.
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Siegfried
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Xenosabre is spot on about cats and the element of surprise. Cat 120+ pounds wins. No ambush no fight.
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