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How would Steppe Mammoths cope living with Dinosaurus?
Amazing 0 (0%)
Good 3 (33.3%)
Ok 3 (33.3%)
Bad 2 (22.2%)
Terrible 1 (11.1%)
Total Votes: 9
How would Steppe Mammoths cope living with Dinosaurus?
Topic Started: Nov 8 2016, 05:16 AM (463 Views)
Mammuthus
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Apex Herbivore
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How well would herds of Steppe Mammoths cope living alongside Dinosaurus?[specifically the Jurassic period]

Would they fail miserably or would they dominate?

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Edited by Mammuthus, Nov 8 2016, 05:20 AM.
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Ausar
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Deathless Decepticon since '12
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What's with all the "could X survive in time period A" threads as of late? Anyway, if you think modern elephants would do fine in the Cretaceous of Africa (well, perhaps barring disease), what's so different with steppe mammoths in the Jurassic?
Edited by Ausar, Nov 8 2016, 05:40 AM.
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Finderskeepers
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They all die from overheating.
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Mammuthus
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Ausar
Nov 8 2016, 05:40 AM
What's with all the "could X survive in time period A" threads as of late? Anyway, if you think modern elephants would do fine in the Cretaceous of Africa (well, perhaps barring disease), what's so different with steppe mammoths in the Jurassic?
Ok they could survive, but would they absolutely dominate?
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Ceratodromeus
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I doubt they would dominate animals that have the niche they're trying to utilize
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Ausar
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Lmao, "absolutely dominate"? lol Wow...just wow.
Edited by Ausar, Apr 23 2017, 02:27 AM.
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Ausar
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Since I'm a bit bored, I decided to add new information to this thread.

Since when exactly in the "Jurassic period" was never made clear, I guess I can just choose when in those 56.3 million years I can put our proboscidean pals in. Mwahahahaha........

On a serious note, I've only looked at information regarding what is now the Morrison Formation. It was apparently interpreted to be a semi-arid or arid environment ([1][2]). I haven't yet found information on just what climate the steppe mammoth lived in, but I'm gonna go out on a limb and doubt that these Eurasian ice age animals were living in temperatures as high as those of the ancient Morrison.

Also, something that may apply to any point in the Jurassic is the pO2 concentration in the atmosphere. According to Tappert et al. (2013), the atmospheric pO2 content tended to be lower in the past 220 million years than they are now (and by extension, in the Pleistocene). Figure 11 shows a nice comparison of O2 levels throughout history, but they have a "break" (if that's what it's called) between the Carnian (Triassic) and Berriasian (early Cretaceous); i.e. they lack any hard data for the whole Jurassic. If the other parts of the Mesozoic are anything to go by though, it may not be unreasonable to think that pO2 levels were notably lower in the Jurassic than they are today and during the Pleistocene. In addition, the study noted that times of lower pO2 levels were, on a broad scale, correlated with times of high pCO2 levels (and this 2014 study seems to corroborate the idea of there being higher CO2 levels during the Jurassic than today). If the mammoths indeed have to cope with lower oxygen levels and higher carbon dioxide levels than they're used to, that too would have important implications for how well they'd function.

That ignores foreign diseases that may have existed during the Jurassic that steppe mammoths may not have immunity to (funny how this point isn't brought up more for animals living closer to or during our own time whenever they're sent off to ecosystems millions of years away from their own).
Edited by Ausar, Mar 7 2017, 11:41 AM.
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blaze
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To the oxygen problem, add that neither grasses nor flowering plants (and their fruits), the mammoth's diet, existed back in the Jurassic.

Even if we ignore those, we need a more specific when and a where in order to give a better opinion.
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