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How well would they cope?
They'd dominate! 2 (13.3%)
Great 8 (53.3%)
Ok 2 (13.3%)
Bad 1 (6.7%)
Horribly 2 (13.3%)
Total Votes: 15
How well would Siberian Tigers cope living in North America?
Topic Started: Dec 14 2016, 03:15 AM (2,335 Views)
Mammuthus
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In your opinion how well would Siberian Tigers cope living in North America? Would they do well living along-side Wolves, Cougars, Bears etc?

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Edited by Mammuthus, Dec 14 2016, 03:17 AM.
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zergthe
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Well, some sources say Siberian Tigers already did live in North America (at least in Alaska) during the Pleistocene, so maybe they'd do fine.
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Mammuthus
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Would they be the apex predator? Would they dominate over other predators?
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Carnotaur
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I think they could be the apex predators,if they get used to hunt the north american big mammals.Though they could have fights with brown bears.
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Mammuthus
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What about large packs of Wolves?

And also, what would they prey on? Would they be capable of taking on Bison and large Moose?
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Mastodon
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Quote:
 
Well, some sources say Siberian Tigers already did live in North America (at least in Alaska) during the Pleistocene, so maybe they'd do fine.


Yup

Quote:
 

Tigers in North Siberia and Yukon/Alaska

Sandra J. Herrington, Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas, Overland Park, Kansas reports about her findings under the title, “Subspecies and the Conservation of Panthera tigris: Preserving Genetic Heterogeneity”. In Ronald L. Tilson and Ulysses S. Seal (eds.) Tigers of the World 1987 Park Ridge, New Jersey, U.S.A. She states about the fossil history:

“Fossils definitely assigned to P. tigris are from the lower to upper Pleistocene. These are from central Asia (Brandt 1871, Tscherski 1892), eastern and northern China (Hooijer 1947, Loukashkin 1938), northern Siberia (Tscherski 1892), Sumatra (Brongersma 1937) and Java (Brongersma 1935) and Japan, Hemmer pers. comm.). Very late Pleistocene to early Holocene fossils are recorded from the Caucasus (Vereschagin 1959) and India (Lydekker 1886). The fossils from northern Siberia ranged up to 70° latitude. These species are of somewhat uncertain affinity, and have also been allied with cave lions (P. spelaea; Heptner and Sludskii 1972).

“The possible presence of tigers this far north, at a time when the Beringian subcontinent linked north-eastern Asia and north-western North America, raises the questions of why tigers did not cross the Bering land bridge, when so many other mammals did. Tigers appear to shun open country (Seidensticker 1976), and the Bering land bridge appears to have been primarily steppe tundra habitat (Fig. 2) However, there is evidence that a variety of habitats were to be found in Beringia, including wooded regions (Hopkins 1982).

“There were large Panthera in North America during the Pleistocene (Fig. 3), and these were assigned to the Fossil lion species (P. atrox; now considered by some to be a sub species of P. leo or consubspecific with cave lions; e.g., Kurten 1985). However, it is not always easy to distinguish between modern lions and tigers, based only on skeletal morphology, so the possibility remained that tigers were among the Northern American Ice Age Panthera in the past (e.g. Merriam and Stock 1932). These fossils were compared with lions and tigers to determine their affinities. However, the possibility that both lions and tigers were inadvertently included in P. atrox seems never to have been considered.

“In a recently completed study of these fossils, I developed a set of morphometric characters that distinguished between lions and tigers with 100% accuracy in discriminant function analyses. In addition, there were several qualitative morphological characters that could distinguish P. leo and P. tigris with a high degree of accuracy. I than compared modern lions and tigers with the fossil North American material. All fossil material from the area of the contiguous United States, an area south of the continental ice sheet during the Wisconsin glaciation, represented lions.


North America during the height of the Last Ice Age. Map from S. J. Herrington. In: Ronald L. Tilson and Ulysses S. Seal (eds.) Tigers of the World (1987:54) Fig. 2. South of the North American Ice Sheet, they have found only the remains of the lion (Panthera atrox), no remains of the tiger. Northeast of the Continental Ice Sheet, in the Yukon Territory, Alaska, Northeast Siberia and northern Central Siberia, they have found the remains of the lion and the tiger. These large cats have lived in the Far North in a temperate climate, when the woolly mammoth was grazing up there.

http://www.hanskrause.de/HKHPE/hkhpe_22_01.htm


Check the link if you want to see it completely.
Edited by Mastodon, Dec 14 2016, 04:03 AM.
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Cape Leopard
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They would do quite well, considering they live in the Russian Far East with a similar climate, vegetation, and assortment of fellow predators: Ussuri brown bears, Asiatic black bear, Amur leopards, Eurasian lynxes and wolves. They would handle living alongside cougars, American wolves, grizzly bears and American black bears. There are plenty of prey for them in North America: about three or more species of deer, wapiti (they have wapiti in the Russian Far East as well), moose, and even bison if a large male tiger can tackle one.
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SquamataOrthoptera
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Id say they will do fine. They would dominate Cougars and packs of Wolfs, only at real risk by a Brown or Polar Bear. A huge Black Bear might also be a dangrous opponent. Their coat can handle the cold well. And any of the terrestrial Animals in north america, are potential food items.
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Mastodon
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I read that tigers were bigger in the pleistocene, I wonder how much, maybe they were comparable to american lions, while jaguars where african lion size in north america.
Edited by Mastodon, Dec 14 2016, 04:11 AM.
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Mammuthus
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Mastodon
Dec 14 2016, 04:07 AM
I read that tigers were bigger in the pleistocene, I wonder how much.
Are you just talking about Siberian Tigers?

Coz there is the Ngandong Tiger which was ment to be huge (large individuals apparently could reach 470kg) but turned out it was smaller than that
Edited by Mammuthus, Dec 14 2016, 04:12 AM.
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Mastodon
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Yes, not the Ngandong Tiger.
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Mammuthus
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Mastodon
Dec 14 2016, 04:12 AM
Yes, not the Ngandong Tiger.
So just Siberian Tigers?
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Mastodon
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Maybe there is other tigers who were bigger but I do not know.
The only real threat of a predator would be a alaskan brown bear, normaly a full grown male weights between 800-900 pounds, that is because they have more resources compared to other brown bears in north america, and in my opinion, it is how heavy the brown bears were in the pleistocene.


Quote:
 
Geographic variation in size, growth, and sexual dimorphism of Alaska brown bears, Ursus arctos

We modeled the growth in skull size of brown bears (Ursus arctos) using 11,651 individuals across 6 regions in Alaska with the von Bertalanffy function. The study areas varied greatly in habitat types and included coastal areas in south-central Alaska, interior regions, and the most northern reaches of the species' North American range. The top-ranking model supported region- and sex-specific growth curves. The large differences in parameter estimates of asymptotic size and the growth coefficient across regions were likely influenced by variation in habitat quality, especially the availability of salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), and these differences relate to other known life-history traits. Contrary to other studies of North American bears, we found a strong hyperallometric relationship in sexual size dimorphism (SSD) where SSD increased with asymptotic size. This relationship supports sexual selection as the driving mechanism of SSD in brown bears. However, the variable intensity of sexual selection across these regions, as demonstrated through hyperallometry in SSD, is likely influenced by proximate factors such as variable food resources and population densities that vary by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The ecological implications of the variation in growth, size, and SSD of brown bears across their Alaskan range are substantial and need to be recognized and incorporated into area-specific management and conservation strategies.
http://m.jmammal.oxfordjournals.org//content/93/3/686

Alaskan brown bear skull compared to another brown bear.
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Seriously would you want to mess with a alaskan brown bear if it were bigger than you?
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Good thing they are omnivores, they would rather walk away than confront another large predator for a carcass.
Edited by Mastodon, Dec 14 2016, 08:56 AM.
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Mammuthus
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What Animal do you think they would prey on the most?
Edited by Mammuthus, Dec 14 2016, 06:38 AM.
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Finderskeepers
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Probably caribou. Or bison. Or maybe deer.
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