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Who wins?
Pampas Fox 2 (40%)
South American Coati 3 (60%)
Total Votes: 5
Pampas Fox v South American Coati
Topic Started: Jan 10 2017, 11:05 PM (290 Views)
Taipan
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Pampas Fox - Lycalopex gymnocercus
The pampas fox (Lycalopex gymnocercus), also known as grey pampean fox, aguará chaí, aguarachay, Azara's fox, or Azara's zorro, is a medium-sized zorro, or "false" fox, native to the South American pampas. The pampas fox resembles the culpeo or Andean fox in appearance and size, but has a proportionately wider snout, reddish fur on the head and neck, and a black mark on the muzzle. Adults range from 51 to 80 centimetres (20 to 31 in) in body length, and weigh 2.4 to 8 kilograms (5.3 to 17.6 lb); males are approximately 10% heavier than females. The pampas foxes mostly live a solitary life, but come together as monogamous pairs in the breeding season to raise their young. Pampas foxes are more omnivorous than most other canids, and have a varied and opportunistic diet. Their primary prey consists of birds, rodents, hares, fruit, carrion, and insects, although they will also eat lizards, armadillos, snails and other invertebrates, lambs, and the eggs of ground-nesting birds.

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South American Coati - Nasua nasua
The South American coati, or ring-tailed coati (Nasua nasua), is a species of coati from tropical and subtropical South America. In Brazilian Portuguese it is known as quati. Weight in this species is 2–7.2 kg (4.4–16 lb) and total length is 85–113 cm (33–44 in), half of that being its tail. Its color is highly variable and the rings on the tail may be quite weak, but it lacks the largely white muzzle ("nose") of its northern cousin, the white-nosed coati. South American coatis are diurnal animals, and they live both on the ground and in trees. They typically live in the forest. They are omnivorous and primarily eat fruit, invertebrates, other small animals and bird's eggs. Coatis search for fruit in trees high in the canopy, and use their snouts to poke through crevices to find animal prey on the ground. They also search for animal prey by turning over rocks on the ground or ripping open logs with their claws.

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SpringHare
Jan 6 2017, 03:06 AM
South American Coati (Nasua nasua) vs Darwin's Fox (Lycalopex fulvipes)


Darwins Fox is too small : Weight 1.9 – 3.95 kg : http://www.arkive.org/darwins-fox/pseudalopex-fulvipes/
I therefore used the Pampas Fox!
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Vivyx
I love felines, birds and arthropods
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I think that the coati might win. I remember that there were a few videos on YouTube about coatis defending themselves against quite large dogs (I remember one of them featured a coati defending itself against a pitbull, and then showing the injuries afterwards), but they don't seem to be around anymore (I think they were deleted). The coati also seems to have quite impressive weaponry, for example a large and robust skull with a high sagittal crest and long canines as well as large claws:

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The fox probably has an agility advantage, though, which I imagine it could use effectively to go around the coati and start biting at areas before the coati could retaliate. That being said, I think that the coati has the upper-hand in a face-to-face fight.
Edited by Vivyx, Jan 11 2017, 02:50 AM.
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AiM4
Autotrophic Organism
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Fox gets my vote. The canid have superior agility and stamina. A hit and run by biting on the head can injured the coati pretty well.
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SpringHare
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Coati is pretty similar to the badger, in its lack of agility, but increased bulkiness. I think the coati would win here.
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Ceratodromeus
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Aspiring herpetologist
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I would go with the coati here as well.
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