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Who wins?
Asian Golden Cat 5 (100%)
New Guinea Singing Dog 0 (0%)
Total Votes: 5
Asian Golden Cat v New Guinea Singing Dog
Topic Started: Feb 17 2017, 10:12 PM (319 Views)
Taipan
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Asian Golden Cat - Catopuma temminckii
The Asian golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii, syn. Catopuma temminckii), also called the Asiatic golden cat and Temminck's golden cat, is a medium-sized wild cat of Southeastern Asia. The Asian golden cat is heavily built, with a typical cat-like appearance. It has a head-body length of 66 to 105 cm (26 to 41 in), with a tail 40 to 57 cm (16 to 22 in) long, and is 56 cm (22 in) at the shoulder. The weight ranges from 9 to 16 kg (20 to 35 lb), which is about two or three times the size of a domesticated cat. Asian golden cats are territorial and solitary. Asian golden cats can climb trees when necessary. They hunt birds, large rodents and reptiles, small ungulates such as muntjacs and young sambar deer. They are capable of bringing down prey much larger than themselves, such as domestic water buffalo calves.[16] In the mountains of Sikkim, they reportedly prey on ghoral.

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New Guinea Singing Dog - Canis lupus dingo var.
The New Guinea Singing Dog (also known as the New Guinea Dingo, Hallstrom Dog and Singer) is a wild dog once found throughout New Guinea. New Guinea Singing Dogs are named for their unique howl. Little is known about New Guinea Singing Dogs in their native habitat. Photographs of wild Singing Dogs are non-existent. Current genetic research indicates that the ancestors of New Guinea Dingoes were probably taken overland through present day China to New Guinea by travelers during pre-Neolithic times. Compared to other species in its genus, the New Guinea Singing Dog is described as relatively short-legged and broad-headed. These dogs have an average shoulder height of 31–46 cm (13–16 in.) and weigh 9–14 kilograms (20–31 lb). They do not have rear dewclaws. The limbs and spine of Singers are very flexible, and they can spread their legs sideways to 90°, comparable to the Norwegian Lundehund. They can also rotate their front and hind paws more than domestic dogs, which enables them to climb trees with thick bark or branches that can be reached from the ground; however their climbing skills do not reach the same level as those of the gray fox. Reports from local sources in Papua New Guinea from the 1970s and the mid-1990s indicate that Singer-like wild dogs found in New Guinea, whether they were pure Singers or hybrids, fed on small to middle-sized marsupials, rodents, birds and fruits. Robert Bino stated that they their prey consisted of cuscuses, wallabies, dwarf cassowaries and other birds.

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ImperialDino
Feb 17 2017, 12:02 AM
New Guinea Singing Dog vs Asiatic Golden Cat
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Vivyx
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I love felines, birds and arthropods
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Is there any information on the robusticity on Asian Golden Cats? I do know that cats like ocelots seem quite impressive in build, but there doesn't seem to be any information on the Asian Golden Cat on the limb robusticity thread.

I think that I'm leaning towards the cat for this match-up, although I do think that this would be a close fight taking into consideration that the New Guinea Singing Dog seems to be more flexible (e.g. the limbs can be rotated to such an extent that the dog can make some good use out of them, like the ability to effectively climb trees. I don't know how well it could grapple in this match-up, though).
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Grazier
Heterotrophic Organism
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On title alone I was thinking this was a mismatch, then I realised I'd never really noticed this cat somehow. Seems pretty legit actually by small cat standards.

Seems a good matchup.

The new guinea singing dog is pretty legit as well. What's not mentioned is they prey on wild pig and rusa deer too. They always ignore the introduced species but wild pig have arguably been on papua new guinea nearly as long as the dogs. The rusa are new additions, but it's not clear how recent. I think most likely before the early 1800s when they were introduced to australia from new caledonia (another melanesian island where obviously they were also introduced, when is a mystery - there is an outside chance these deer were introduced from mainland asia to the melanesian islands thousands of years ago by polynesian sea farers. Again we can't know for sure).
Chital and Fallow deer also exist in papua new guinea in less abundance. All would be targetted by NGSDs.

The NGSD is a dingo that is slightly shorter and stockier to be adapted to dense tropical jungle, but should be considered on par with the dingo in combat/hunting and is basically the same animal. The dingo also "sings". In fact all primitive dogs do, singing pre-dates barking.
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FelinePowah
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the cats as big as the dog......so miss match in favor of the cat!
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SquamataOrthoptera
Orthoptera and Squamata
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I wont make a opinipn on the fight until im slightly more well knowleged on both opponents.
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Ceratodromeus
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Aspiring herpetologist
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FelinePowah
Feb 17 2017, 11:00 PM
the cats as big as the dog......so miss match in favor of the cat!
Add something relevant or don't say anything at all.
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AiM4
Autotrophic Organism
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Very close and good match up. Can't believe I never thought about this before.

As usual 6/10 for the cat. But not underestimating the dog though, both take very impressive prey for their size. In fact I thinkg this matchup is closer then the Golden Jackal vs AGC thread.

Also, is this dog a subspecies to the dingo or it's basically it's own genus?
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ImperialDino
Omnivore
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FelinePowah
Feb 17 2017, 11:00 PM
the cats as big as the dog......so miss match in favor of the cat!
Cats are only superior to dogs around the same weight when you are dealing with BIG CATS...the same rules for these little cats don't apply, as smaller dogs are more physically strong then the cats and smaller dogs don't have atrocious agility like alot of bigger dogs in comparison to bigger cats.
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Grazier
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ImperialDino
Feb 18 2017, 11:43 AM
FelinePowah
Feb 17 2017, 11:00 PM
the cats as big as the dog......so miss match in favor of the cat!
Cats are only superior to dogs around the same weight when you are dealing with BIG CATS...the same rules for these little cats don't apply, as smaller dogs are more physically strong then the cats and smaller dogs don't have atrocious agility like alot of bigger dogs in comparison to bigger cats.
Well said.

The big cats are impressive, but unfortunately no dog is "at parity" with them to accurately guage the comparison. The dogs that approach at parity are useless livestock guardians that actually are terribly ineffective fighters due to doing basically nothing for a job, or over-inflated over blown meat bag pet "mastiffs", which until 1944 never weighed more than 100 lbs and usually less. So their real actual working weight is 90 lbs or so, they're effectively burdened with sandbags (in the form of useless meat) to reach weights over 100 lbs.

The cat vs dog fight is only interesting around 90-100 lbs with boarhound vs leopard or cougar, commonly framed as "dogo vs cougar", but the dogo is a lame inflated stupid purebreed show dog so that actually isn't ideal. However it's a useful way to present the most interesting cat vs dog contest available. A mongrel boar dog around 90-100 lbs, like what the dogo is supposed to represent, is a great parity matchup for a smaller variant of cougar. (or leopard). It is also the highest weight the dog can actually be a functional formidable combatant, and the lowest weight a cat can be.

In the weight classes lower than this, dogs beat cats, not all dogs (foxes arguably don't, although are perhaps a good matchup for parity small felines- both are weak and fragile). Any normal pet dog in the weight class of foxes and small cats beats both easily.
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