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Who wins?
American Lion (Coalition of 4) 3 (75%)
Skorpiovenator bustingorryi 1 (25%)
Total Votes: 4
American Lion (Coalition of 4) v Skorpiovenator bustingorryi
Topic Started: Oct 9 2017, 12:26 PM (1,408 Views)
Taipan
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American Lion (Coalition of 4) - Panthera leo atrox
The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) — also known as the North American lion, Naegele’s giant jaguar or American cave lion — is an extinct lion of the family Felidae, endemic to North America during the Pleistocene epoch (0.34 mya to 11,000 years ago), existing for approximately 0.33 million years. It has been shown by genetic analysis to be a sister lineage to the Eurasian cave lion (Panthera leo spelaea or P. spelaea). The American lion is an extinct animal which originated in North America and went on to colonize part of South America as part of the Great American Interchange. The head-body length of the American lion is estimated to have been 1.6–2.5 m (5 ft 3 in–8 ft 2 in) and it would have stood 1.2 metres (4 ft) at the shoulder.[4] Thus it was smaller than its contemporary competitor for prey, the giant short-faced bear, which was the largest carnivoran of North America at the time. The American lion was not as heavily built as the saber-toothed cat Smilodon populator, which may have weighed up to 360–470 kilograms (790–1,000 lb). Sorkin (2008) estimated it to weigh roughly 420 kilograms (930 lb), but new estimations show a top weight of 351 kg (774lbs.) for the largest specimen and an average weight for males of 255.65 kg (563lbs.).

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Skorpiovenator bustingorryii
Skorpiovenator is a genus of abelisaurid theropod dinosaur from the late Cretaceous period of Argentina. The type species, Skorpiovenator bustingorryi, is known from a single, nearly complete skeleton missing only most of the forelimbs and parts of the tail. The specimen was recovered from the lower part of the Huincul Formation in Patagonia, dating to the late Cenomanian stage, about 95 million years ago. Skorpiovenator was estimated to have grown up to 6 m (19.7 ft) in length. In 2010, Gregory S. Paul gave larger estimations of 7.5 m (24.6 ft) and 1.67 tonnes (1.84 short tons). In 2016, a similar size to the original estimate at 6.2 m (20.3 ft) was estimated. It had short, stubby, near-useless arms, but strong legs with powerful thighs and sturdy shins over which its large body was balanced. Skorpiovenator's skull was short, stout and covered in the ridges, furrows, tubercles and bumpy nodules that are scattered over the heads of most abelisaurid theropods. Its slender jaws housed rows of razor-sharp teeth. Skorpiovenator may not have had a large bite force, as has been suggested for some other abelisaurids. Skorpiovenator may have used its deep skull as a club, arching its head back and swinging it down onto its prey to drive the teeth home with enough force to do some serious damage to its prey

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Thalassophoneus
Oct 9 2017, 03:01 AM
2 American lions VS Skorpiovenator




ADMIN - Based on similar threads we need more lions to make it fair.

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Thalassophoneus
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Pelagic Killer
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Are there any estimates for the bite force of abelisaurs?
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paul cooper
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Size Comparison for the two
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Taipan
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Thalassophoneus
Oct 9 2017, 02:07 PM
Are there any estimates for the bite force of abelisaurs?


Its thought to be high, but did you read this: "Skorpiovenator may not have had a large bite force, as has been suggested for some other abelisaurids."

Id say one bite would be pretty lethal on an animal weighing less than 750 pounds.

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Thalassophoneus
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paul cooper
Oct 9 2017, 02:10 PM
Size Comparison for the two
Posted Image
This might be a little exaggerated. Here is a scaled skeletal of Skorpiovenator.

Posted Image

4 lions could possibly surround it and attack it. The problem is that lions primarily rely on grabbing themselves from their prey till it's exhausted, and since Skorpiovenator was quite fast this would have been difficult for them.
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paul cooper
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Thalassophoneus
Oct 9 2017, 09:15 PM
paul cooper
Oct 9 2017, 02:10 PM
Size Comparison for the two
Posted Image
This might be a little exaggerated. Here is a scaled skeletal of Skorpiovenator.

Posted Image

4 lions could possibly surround it and attack it. The problem is that lions primarily rely on grabbing themselves from their prey till it's exhausted, and since Skorpiovenator was quite fast this would have been difficult for them.
What is the height i should use?
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Thalassophoneus
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paul cooper
Oct 10 2017, 10:29 AM
Thalassophoneus
Oct 9 2017, 09:15 PM
paul cooper
Oct 9 2017, 02:10 PM
Size Comparison for the two
Posted Image
This might be a little exaggerated. Here is a scaled skeletal of Skorpiovenator.

Posted Image

4 lions could possibly surround it and attack it. The problem is that lions primarily rely on grabbing themselves from their prey till it's exhausted, and since Skorpiovenator was quite fast this would have been difficult for them.
What is the height i should use?
This one appears to be 2,3 m. or 7,5 feet. And its head looks kinda smaller. It is probably more properly scaled.
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blaze
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The second one is more accurate, however, the lion was also oversized in the other scale chart but only by 12% as opposed to 22% for Skorpiovenator
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Ferreomus
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Taipan
Oct 9 2017, 03:52 PM
Thalassophoneus
Oct 9 2017, 02:07 PM
Are there any estimates for the bite force of abelisaurs?


Its thought to be high, but did you read this: "Skorpiovenator may not have had a large bite force, as has been suggested for some other abelisaurids."

Id say one bite would be pretty lethal on an animal weighing less than 750 pounds.

The lion was exactly 750 pounds on average
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paul cooper
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blaze
Oct 10 2017, 02:08 PM
The second one is more accurate, however, the lion was also oversized in the other scale chart but only by 12% as opposed to 22% for Skorpiovenator
I used the lions sizes from taipans original post for the american lion.
Tomorrow i will update the Skorpiovenator
The lion in my pic is 4 feet at the shoulder, and 7.5 feet from nose to base of tail.
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Thalassophoneus
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Ferreomus
Oct 10 2017, 04:22 PM
Taipan
Oct 9 2017, 03:52 PM
Thalassophoneus
Oct 9 2017, 02:07 PM
Are there any estimates for the bite force of abelisaurs?


Its thought to be high, but did you read this: "Skorpiovenator may not have had a large bite force, as has been suggested for some other abelisaurids."

Id say one bite would be pretty lethal on an animal weighing less than 750 pounds.

The lion was exactly 750 pounds on average
Not really. It would have been 669 pounds.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_lion

a more recent study showed an average weight for males of 256 kg (564 lb) and 351 kg (774 lb) for the largest specimen analyzed.[8]
I actually have a feeling that PaleoJoe's "corrected" Skorpiovenator skeletal may still be inproperly scaled and proportioned.
Edited by Thalassophoneus, Oct 10 2017, 10:29 PM.
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blaze
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@paul cooper
Maybe I measured it wrong? as I got 1.35m (~4.5ft) at the shoulder for it
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Thalassophoneus
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It appears that PaleoJoe's skeletal of Skorpiovenator is indeed 25% larger than it should.
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paul cooper
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Thalassophoneus
Oct 11 2017, 06:12 AM
It appears that PaleoJoe's skeletal of Skorpiovenator is indeed 25% larger than it should.
Ok i will make the pics now - What shoulder height do you want me to use for the lion, the height for the Skorpiovenator, and the length too for both animals?
Also, what model to use for Skorpiovenator?
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Thalassophoneus
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paul cooper
Oct 11 2017, 09:44 AM
Thalassophoneus
Oct 11 2017, 06:12 AM
It appears that PaleoJoe's skeletal of Skorpiovenator is indeed 25% larger than it should.
Ok i will make the pics now - What shoulder height do you want me to use for the lion, the height for the Skorpiovenator, and the length too for both animals?
Also, what model to use for Skorpiovenator?
For Skorpiovenator the most accurate skeletal is probably this one, second from the top.

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