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Who wins?
European (Common) Rabbit 2 (50%)
Common Squirrel Monkey 2 (50%)
Total Votes: 4
European (Common) Rabbit v Common Squirrel Monkey
Topic Started: Oct 9 2017, 10:13 PM (447 Views)
Taipan
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European (Common) Rabbit - Oryctolagus cuniculus
The European Rabbit or Common Rabbit is a species of rabbit native to south west Europe (Spain and Portugal) and north west Africa (Morocco and Algeria). It has been widely introduced elsewhere, often with devastating effects on local biodiversity. However, its decline in its native range (caused by the diseases myxomatosis and rabbit calicivirus as well as over-hunting and habitat loss) has caused the decline of its highly dependent predators, the Iberian Lynx and the Spanish Imperial Eagle. The European Rabbit is a small, grey-brown mammal ranging from 34–45 cm (13-18 in) in length, and is approximately 1.3-2.2 kg (3-5 lb) in weight. As a lagomorph, it has four sharp incisors (two on top, two on bottom) that grow continuously throughout its life, and two peg teeth on the top behind the incisors, dissimilar to those of rodents (which have only 2 each, top and bottom). Rabbits have long ears, large hind legs, and short, fluffy tails. Rabbits move by hopping, using their long and powerful hind legs. To facilitate quick movement, a rabbit's hind feet have a thick padding of fur to dampen the shock of rapid hopping. Their toes are long, and are webbed to keep from spreading apart as the animal jumps.

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Common Squirrel Monkey - Saimiri sciureus
The common squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) is a small New World primate from the Cebidae (squirrel monkey) family, and native to the tropical areas of South America. The common squirrel monkey is considered both frugivorous and insectivorous, preferring berry-like fruit on branches. When in captivity, the squirrel monkeys are fed fruits like apples, oranges, grapes, and bananas. They also consume a variety of vegetables that include lettuce, celery, and onions. Squirrel monkeys also looks for insects, and small vertebrates, such as tree frogs. It obtains a majority of water from the foods eaten, and will also obtain water from holes in trees and puddles on the ground. When fruit is scarce, the common squirrel monkey will drink nectar. The common squirrel monkey is diurnal. It is usually quiet but will utter loud cries when alarmed. The common squirrel monkey uses different types of calls for specific situations. Some of their common call types include caw, bawls, and shriek. Squirrel monkeys utter caws mostly when they are trying to defend a territory. They may use bawls previous to a fight as well as after one. Average mass: 925 g

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Vivyx
Oct 9 2017, 10:11 AM
European (Common) Rabbit v Common Squirrel Monkey
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Ferreomus
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This definetley a 50^50 the are as quick as each other but the monkey has sharp canines which can do damage but the rabbits oversized incisors will do damage but not as effective as the monkeys
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Vivyx
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I'll be away for a few days, but I'm going to state my full opinion on this match-up as soon as I can (staying with relatives at the moment). For the time being, just going to say that I'm in definite agreement with Ferreomus that this is a close match-up.
Edited by Vivyx, Oct 13 2017, 12:39 AM.
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Ferreomus
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Vivyx
Oct 11 2017, 09:34 AM
I'll be away for a few days, but I'm going to state my full opinion on this match-up as soon as I get back home on Saturday (staying with relatives at the moment). For the time being, just going to say that I'm in definite agreement with Ferreomus that this is a close match-up.
Thanks Vivyx ,hope your safe at your relatives home man.
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Vivyx
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Managed to get to a computer!

I think that the monkey might win in a potentially close fight.

Both seem to partake in vicious/violent intraspecific conflict:

"Aggression is extremely common and Surinamese squirrel monkeys often have disfiguring scars from fighting with group members (Boinski 1999; Boinski et al. 2002)."

"When mixed-sex troops are formed, high-ranking males fight fiercely to prevent solitary or peripheral males from joining the group (Boinski et al. 2005)."


http://pin.primate.wisc.edu/factsheets/entry/squirrel_monkey/behav

Rabbits can be extremely aggressive in the wild, and competition between males can often lead to severe injury and death. Although hostile displays are used, and males often squirt urine on challengers as a form of dominance, this nearly always enrages the challenger, resulting in immediate attack. Rabbits use their powerful back legs as weapons, kicking at an opponent's underside, as well as biting and scratching with the front paws

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_rabbit

Not sure how reliable this is, but this also says that rabbits might fight to the death

Despite what some people think, rabbits are actually fully capable of fighting predators and taking part in interspecific conflict:



http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/116708/rabbit-killing-chickens

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/426172/would-a-rabbit-kill-a-chicken

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/killer-rabbits-butcher-snakes/news-story/4570ad5a68075dc93c0aa9f57ad3c81f

http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/kill-the-wabbit-crazed-hare-attacks-austrian-couple-a-477537.html

I think it should also be worth noting that rabbits don't just kick and bite; they also headbutt, charge and scratch. It seems that the rabbit has enough weaponry in its disposal to effectively fight against the monkey's grappling capabilities. That being said, rabbits don't always fare very well against grappling opponents (mustelids come to mind...). I think there's also a good chance of the squirrel monkey winning through latching onto the lagomorph's back and biting it from there. The fact that the monkey doesn't perform such a tactic as much as mustelids in interspecific conflict could be troubling for it in this circumstance though, in that there could be a good chance of the rabbit also finishing the monkey off if the primate wasn't careful in its approach.

The rabbit does have a size advantage, but I wonder if that is necessary considering that lagomorphs don't always fare very well against grappling opponents?




I'll probably edit more of this post when I get back home on Saturday. Don't have a lot of free time at the moment.
Here, have a cute picture of a juvenile squirrel monkey and a domestic rabbit.

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Edited by Vivyx, Nov 23 2017, 02:47 AM.
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Ferreomus
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Vivyx
Oct 12 2017, 11:12 PM
Managed to get to a computer!

I think that this is a close fight and almost a 50/50, but I'm leaning slightly towards the rabbit.

Both seem to partake in vicious/violent intraspecific conflict:

"Aggression is extremely common and Surinamese squirrel monkeys often have disfiguring scars from fighting with group members (Boinski 1999; Boinski et al. 2002)."

"When mixed-sex troops are formed, high-ranking males fight fiercely to prevent solitary or peripheral males from joining the group (Boinski et al. 2005)."


http://pin.primate.wisc.edu/factsheets/entry/squirrel_monkey/behav

Rabbits can be extremely aggressive in the wild, and competition between males can often lead to severe injury and death. Although hostile displays are used, and males often squirt urine on challengers as a form of dominance, this nearly always enrages the challenger, resulting in immediate attack. Rabbits use their powerful back legs as weapons, kicking at an opponent's underside, as well as biting and scratching with the front paws

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_rabbit

Not sure how reliable this is, but this also says that rabbits might fight to the death

Despite what some people think, rabbits are actually fully capable of fighting predators and taking part in interspecific conflict:



http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/116708/rabbit-killing-chickens

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/426172/would-a-rabbit-kill-a-chicken

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/killer-rabbits-butcher-snakes/news-story/4570ad5a68075dc93c0aa9f57ad3c81f

http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/kill-the-wabbit-crazed-hare-attacks-austrian-couple-a-477537.html

I think it should also be worth noting that rabbits don't just kick and bite; they also headbutt, charge and scratch. It seems that the rabbit has enough weaponry in its disposal to effectively fight against the monkey's grappling capabilities. That being said, rabbits don't always fare very well against grappling opponents (mustelids come to mind...). I think there's also a good chance of the squirrel monkey winning through latching onto the lagomorph's back and biting it from there. The fact that the monkey doesn't perform such a tactic as much as mustelids in interspecific conflict could be troubling for it in this circumstance though, in that there could be a good chance of the rabbit also finishing the monkey off if the primate wasn't careful in its approach.

The rabbit does have a size advantage, but I wonder if that is necessary considering that lagomorphs don't always fare very well against grappling opponents? Not sure about this one.




I'll probably edit more of this post when I get back home on Saturday. Don't have a lot of free time at the moment.
Here, have a cute picture of a juvenile squirrel monkey and a domestic rabbit.

Posted Image
I've changed my mind female rabbit's have fought off venomous smakes like adders and etc.But I do in mind think that the monkey has a still chance,sadly I agree withat your Vivyx the rabbit has a slight chance.
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Taipan
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I dont think Rabbits are effective fighters. Much smaller Stoats kill them:



I dont think the Monkey has the killing instinct of a Stoat, but the monkey should be able to dominate the fight with its grappling limbs.
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Vivyx
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Actually, I think I'll change my mind on this one. Monkey wins, but it could still be a potentially close fight.
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