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Leopard v Spotted Hyena
Topic Started: Jan 6 2012, 10:19 PM (19,638 Views)
Taipan
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Leopard - Panthera pardus
The leopard, Panthera pardus, is a member of the Felidae family and the smallest of the four "big cats" in the genus Panthera, the other three being the tiger, lion, and jaguar. The leopard was once distributed across eastern and southern Asia and Africa, from Siberia to South Africa, but its range of distribution has decreased radically because of hunting and loss of habitat. It is now chiefly found in sub-Saharan Africa; there are also fragmented populations in Indonesia, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Indochina, Malaysia, and China. Because of its declining range and population, it is listed as a "Near Threatened" species by the IUCN.
Leopard are agile and stealthy predators. Although smaller than other members of the Panthera genus, they are able to take large prey due to their massive skulls that facilitate powerful jaw muscles. Head and body length is between 125 and 165 cm (49 and 65 in), and the tail reaches 60 to 110 cm (24 to 43 in). Shoulder height is 45 to 80 cm (18 to 31 in). The muscles attached to the scapula are exceptionally strong, which enhance their ability to climb trees. They show a great diversity in size. Males are about 30% larger than females, weighing 30 to 91 kg (66 to 200 lb) compared to 23 to 60 kg (51 to 130 lb) for females. Large males of up to 91 lb (41 kg) have been documented in Kruger National Park in South Africa; however, males in the South Africa's coastal mountains average 31 lb (14 kg). This wide variation in size is thought to result from the quality and availability of prey found in each habitat. Smaller sized leopards also are known in the deserts of the Middle East.[4] Its body is comparatively long, and its legs are short.

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Spotted Hyena - Crocuta crocuta
The spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta), also known as the laughing hyena or tiger wolf, is a species of hyena native to Sub-Saharan Africa. It is listed as Least Concern by the IUCN on account of its widespread range and large numbers estimated at 10,000 individuals. The spotted hyena is the largest extant member of the Hyaenidae.[43] Adults measure 95.0—165.8 cm in body length, and have a shoulder height of 70.0-91.5 cm. Adult male spotted hyenas in the Serengeti weigh 40.5—55.0 kg (89—121 lb), while females weigh 44.5—63.9 kg (98—141 lb). Spotted hyenas in Zambia tend to be heavier, with males weighing on average 67.6 kg (149 lb), and females 69.2 kg (153 lb). Exceptionally large weights of 81.7 kg (180 lb) and 86 kg (190 lb) are known. It has been estimated that adult members of the now extinct Eurasian populations weighed 102 kg (225 lbs).

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Edited by Taipan, Jan 19 2012, 10:17 PM.
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Replies:
Apex
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I believe the hyeana will win due to durability and pain tolerance
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Bull and Terrier
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We have been trough this before, male Tom leopards will take any hyena, but at average weights I will give the leopard only a slightly advantage.
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Canidae
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Bull and Terrier
Jan 11 2012, 10:07 PM
We have been trough this before, male Tom leopards will take any hyena, but at average weights I will give the leopard only a slightly advantage.
Not at all, a female Hyena would be hugely tough for a Tom Leopard to even subdue, let alone kill. They certainly won't take 'any hyena'.
I've said before, I'm still waiting for someone to try and prove the myth that there's a sort of 'weight boundary' that when crossed male Leopards become invincible.
Edited by Canidae, Jan 12 2012, 01:13 AM.
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Megafelis Fatalis
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Leopard wins IMO
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mohamad
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always we watched on tv when hyenas chasing leopard and taken its kills so i think if leopard was stronger than hyena it was fight it.
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Bull and Terrier
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Canidae
Jan 12 2012, 01:12 AM
Bull and Terrier
Jan 11 2012, 10:07 PM
We have been trough this before, male Tom leopards will take any hyena, but at average weights I will give the leopard only a slightly advantage.
Not at all, a female Hyena would be hugely tough for a Tom Leopard to even subdue, let alone kill. They certainly won't take 'any hyena'.
I've said before, I'm still waiting for someone to try and prove the myth that there's a sort of 'weight boundary' that when crossed male Leopards become invincible.
From the old thread I think proof from both gato gardo, taipan and some others clearly showed that a lagre male tom would win. You and hyeanidae also posted some cases where hyenas dominated, but the only one where a hyena really hurt a leopard motally was the one year old juvenile leopard who died of infections from the wounds. We will just have to agree to disagree ;D
For me a male tom at 80kg or more will even be a match for two adult hyenas. But I favour a matriarch hyena vs the average female leopard most of the time.
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Rodentsofunusualsize
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What? An 80 kilo Leopard a match for two adult Hyenas in a straight up fight? What exactly are you smoking, I want some.
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Canidae
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Bull and Terrier
Jan 12 2012, 09:13 PM
Canidae
Jan 12 2012, 01:12 AM
Bull and Terrier
Jan 11 2012, 10:07 PM
We have been trough this before, male Tom leopards will take any hyena, but at average weights I will give the leopard only a slightly advantage.
Not at all, a female Hyena would be hugely tough for a Tom Leopard to even subdue, let alone kill. They certainly won't take 'any hyena'.
I've said before, I'm still waiting for someone to try and prove the myth that there's a sort of 'weight boundary' that when crossed male Leopards become invincible.
From the old thread I think proof from both gato gardo, taipan and some others clearly showed that a lagre male tom would win. You and hyeanidae also posted some cases where hyenas dominated, but the only one where a hyena really hurt a leopard motally was the one year old juvenile leopard who died of infections from the wounds. We will just have to agree to disagree ;D
For me a male tom at 80kg or more will even be a match for two adult hyenas. But I favour a matriarch hyena vs the average female leopard most of the time.
Could you see if you could dig up such proof? There's no recorded incidents of a Leopard taking an adult specimen of any hyena, let alone a Spotted. Gato even said it was a tough fight and not a 'clear victory' at all.
There's also an account from Pienaar with a single hyena toying a fully grown young Leopard carcass -
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This was put in the section talking of Spotted Hyena intraguild predation and both Pienaar and Bailey believe it a reasonable assumption the Hyena killed it. Of course without solid evidence it is up to your own opinion - Leopard supporters naturally doubted it - but I.M.O a Male Leopard competitor may have partially eaten it as described in sources here - http://ewasolions.wildlifedirect.org/2009/01/12/research-on-leopard-cannibalism/ - (I will add to the Leopard profile now) and I doubt a Hyena would do anything with a leftover Lion kill other than eat it.
But yes, agree to disgree can often be the final conclusion!
Edited by Canidae, Jan 12 2012, 09:50 PM.
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Taipan
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Leopard wins.




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Leopard and Hyena

Date: Monday, October 08, 2007

Producer: Ronnie Watt
E-mail: veldfocus@iafrica.com

It was at Londolozi where John Hillidge of Dainfern watched a leopard feeding on its kill in the branches of a tree. A hyena was anxiously pacing below, waiting for scraps to fall to the ground. The leopard then finished feeding, andjumps to the ground and finds a comfortable spot in the middle of a dry river bed. The young hyena loiters about, but then boldly comes right up to the leopard! With its belly full the leopard relaxes and nods off. It appeared oblivious to the hyena but then rears its head and snarls at the intruder, warning it off.
Such a peaceful scene between two otherwise bitter enemies is out of the ordinary! If more hyenas were present it could have been quite a different scenario as there is no love lost between these two rival species.

Previously we showed a hyena pirating prey from a leopard. Though the leopard tried to stand its ground, the hyena boldly rushed in to grab the prey. Twice the leopard tried to fend off the thief but in the end the hyena triumphed and carried off the remains of the carcass.

But hyenas do not always walk away unscathed from interactions with leopards. There is one record of a leopard which not only knew the trick of keeping a hyena at bay, but also killed it and it did so not only once, but three times!

But here there’s no call for aggression from either side here. The leopard has nothing, except for its peace and quiet, to defend. The hyena won’t attack because there is nothing to scavenge. For now the two adversaries will tolerate one another - next time ‘round, it might be an altogether different case.

http://www.5050.co.za/inserts.asp?ID=7998




From 1977marc

1977marc
 
Huge male leopard cripples hyena after loosing his kill...

damn this is a big Tom...

It looks as the male lost his kill..still breathing heavilly...when he feels recovered he goes after the hyena..





scottwolverine1111
 
Has this video been shown?





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"It was first light as we left Mombo camp, within five minitues we saw Hyenas running from all directions. Our guide Simon shouted 'Leopard in a tree' but as we approached he jumped down. Who knows why? maybe he thought there was only one Hyena, BIG mistake! before long he was surrounded by 5 blocking his escape to a nearby tree. They attacked him from all sides (note the one on the right has a firm hold)he was rolling on his back slashing with all feet. The sounds were horrific and there were tears from the ladies in our vehicle,clouds of dust everywhere.They dragged him into a bush and before long all went quiet, we feared the worst,reminding me of thugs beating up a helpless guy in a back alley. After a while the Leopard appeared slowly edging away from the bush again followed but the Hyenas, but this time they were submissive and keeping a safe distance. Later we managed to locate them licking their wounds, the old man had inflicted some nasty gashes and bites.
Not the best of images, it happened so quickly and didn't have much of a view, or the opportunity to change my settings."


http://www.outdoorphoto.co.za/forum/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=236038
(originally posted by Chui)




Bite Force
Panthera pardus
Bite Force Canines - 621.1 N
Bite Force Carnissials - 964.4 N
BFQ Canines - 119,8
BFQ Carnissials - 123.4

Crocuta crocuta
Bite Force Canines - 565.7 N
Bite Force Carnissials - 985.5 N
BFQ Canines - 99.6
BFQ Carnissials - 115.3




The article is entitled The Quintessential Cat by Luke Hunter.

The leopard's remarkably diverse diet is one reason for its exceptional success. Whereas lion prides require high densities of large herbivores to subsist, and cheetahs are most successful where antelopes such as gazelles and impalas are abundant, the leopard can survive on fish, rodents and birds. Ted Bailey, a scientist who studied leopards in the Kruger National Park, tallied prey records from around the continent and discovered that at least 92 different species have been documented in the leopard's diet, among them dung beetles, grasshoppers and even scorpions. However, leopards generally invest the most energy in hunting prey where the pay-off is greatest, and in the majority of African ecosystems they concentrate on the most abundant medium-sized ungulates present. In the southern Kruger Park where impala density is among the highest in Africa, Bailey's study showed that impalas constituted almost 88 per cent of leopard kills. In Tanzania's Serengeti National Park, the plentiful Thomson's gazelle is the most frequently killed prey, whereas in Kafue National Park in Zambia it is reedbuck, waterbuck and puku.

Where such species are absent or occur in low numbers, the leopard is able to switch to other, less 'profitable' prey. In the Kalahari Desert, most kills weigh less than 20 kilograms, and porcupines, steenbok and small carnivores feature prominently in the leopard's diet. In Israel's Judean desert, Zimbabwe's Matobo Hills and the Cedarberg range in the south-western Cape, rock hyraxes (dassies) are the most common prey item, whereas West African rainforest leopards have a diet dominated by duikers and small primates such as colobus and mangabey monkeys.

Even our closest relatives are not invulnerable. In the Tai' Forest of the Cote d'lvoire, leopard predation is the main cause of chimpanzee mortality. Indeed, the leopard is one of the few carnivores able to overcome the extraordinary intelligence, vigilance and strength of adult chimps. During a 12-year study, chimp researchers documented at least 17 of their study animals lost to attacks by leopards. A further six severe maulings were observed: one of the chimps injured was a prime adult male - a formidable opponent for any predator. Despite these interactions, primates do not feature as prey as often as people suspect. One of the great myths about leopards is that baboons are an especially favoured prey item. Yet in the western Cape mountains where baboons are one of the most abundant of the larger mammals, only two per cent of leopard scats in one study contained baboon hairs. While baboons are definitely taken wherever the two species co-occur, there are numerous records of leopards being severely injured or even killed by baboon troops. Leopards treat baboons with due caution; they often avoid them during the day and concentrate on attacking stragglers or juveniles, sometimes even taking them from their night-time roosts in trees and rock outcrops.

Other carnivores are also fair game to leopards. While lions may invest a great deal of energy in killing fellow predators, their motivation seems more to eliminate competition than to acquire food, and they frequently leave such kills untouched. Leopards, however, have been recorded killing and eating everything from dwarf mongooses to adult spotted hyaenas. One well-observed Ngorongoro Crater leopard killed and ate 11 jackals in less than a month, which suggests that small canids may be preferred prey when abundant, and there is considerable truth in the belief that leopards are partial to dogs. Such unusual preferences may vary from region to region. In arid north-eastern Namibia, researcher Flip Stander discovered adult cheetahs were sometimes killed as prey by leopards, a remarkable occurrence also recently observed by tourists in the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park in South Africa. Yet in the comparitively lush bushveld of northern KwaZulu-Natal, I saw three cases of leopards killing cheetahs and leaving the carcasses untouched. Perhaps where the density of more 'typical' prey species is low - such as in desert regions - leopards cannot afford to be choosy and are more likely to eat the meat of other predators.

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Canidae
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Taipan, I thought we cleared a lot of that up on old Carnivora :

Veldfocus account - Was confirmed to be Bailey, however, Bailey records only 2 hyenas and killed and neither being conclusively adult. Given only young hyenas have been taken it wouldn't be a good assumption at all to suggest the unidentified one was.
Quintessiential cat - Again confirmed with contact with Luke Hunter that it was Bailey, which has already been discussed.
Picture series - I sent you the full account and the extra ones in my O.P on this thread, confirming the hyena was unaware of the Leopard approaching when it attacked from behind.
Bite Force - This isn't quite conclusive, multiple accounts give differant values for all species and some give higher values to hyenas over Leopards. I.M.O best to accept they are roughly equal.
Hyena Group attack - Other accounts have said it - "The hyena won’t attack because there is nothing to scavenge." They had no real reason to kill it. Surely you don't think he would have survived against 5 hyenas?!

The videos are pretty inconclusive too, one is just a hyena getting slapped and you can't quite see what goes in 1977Marc's video, but the hyena certainly isn't killed and unlikely 'crippled'.
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populator135
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Leopards are faster, more agile, better armed, and more powerful. They are a far more effective killing machine.
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Canidae
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populator135
Jan 13 2012, 03:00 AM
Leopards are faster, more agile, better armed, and more powerful. They are a far more effective killing machine.
Please read my O.P on this thread in regard to 'better armed and more powerful'.
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populator135
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I have yet to see a hyena with retractable claws, muscled forelimbs, and the abillity to drag animals 2-3 it's own weigh up a tree.
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Canidae
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populator135
Jan 13 2012, 05:21 AM
I have yet to see a hyena with retractable claws, muscled forelimbs, and the abillity to drag animals 2-3 it's own weigh up a tree.
We dismissed that old Leopard myth back on the old forums, leopards can't tree something 2 or 3 times there own weight up a tree. I think the larget treed prey was a Giraffe calf. And hyenas can easily drag large prey along and have bested Leopards in tug of war. Leopards are not stronger.
Retractable claws will not do serious damage, hyenas absorb blows from them with ease as endless Youtube videos bar a few with wimpier hyenas prove.
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Rodentsofunusualsize
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And I have yet to see a Leopard that can suffer hideous amounts of damage and pain including being harassed and bitten by two male Lions at once, and yet survive. (The Hyena didn't end up surviving that but he lasted a helluva lot longer than any other animal including a Leopard would have.)
Edited by Rodentsofunusualsize, Jan 13 2012, 07:04 AM.
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