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Who wins?
Coyote 13 (34.2%)
Golden Eagle 25 (65.8%)
Total Votes: 38
Coyote v Golden Eagle
Topic Started: Jan 6 2012, 10:33 PM (3,133 Views)
Taipan
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Coyote - Canis latrans
The coyote (Canis latrans), also known as the American jackal or the prairie wolf, is a species of canine found throughout North and Central America, ranging from Panama in the south, north through Mexico, the United States and Canada. It occurs as far north as Alaska and all but the northernmost portions of Canada. The color of the coyote's pelt varies from grayish-brown to yellowish-gray on the upper parts, while the throat and belly tend to have a buff or white color. The forelegs, sides of the head, muzzle and paws are reddish-brown. The back has tawny-colored underfur and long, black-tipped guard hairs that form a black dorsal stripe and a dark cross on the shoulder area. The black-tipped tail has a scent gland located on its dorsal base. Coyotes shed once a year, beginning in May with light hair loss, ending in July after heavy shedding. The ears are proportionately large in relation to the head, while the feet are relatively small in relation to the rest of the body. Certain experts have noted the shape of a domestic dog's brain case is closer to the coyote's in shape than that of a wolf's. Mountain-dwelling coyotes tend to be dark-furred, while desert coyotes tend to be more light brown in color. Coyotes typically grow to 30–34 in (76–86 cm) in length, not counting a tail of 12–16 in (30–41 cm), stand about 23–26 in (58–66 cm) at the shoulder and, on average, weigh from 15–46 lb (6.8–21 kg). Northern coyotes are typically larger than southern subspecies, with the largest coyotes on record weighing 74.75 pounds (33.91 kg) and measuring 1.75 m (5.7 ft) in total length.

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Golden Eagle - Aquila chrysaetos
The Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the best known birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. Once widespread across the Holarctic, it has disappeared from many of the more heavily populated areas. Despite being extirpated from some its former range or uncommon, the species is still fairly ubiquitous, being present in Eurasia, North America, and parts of Africa. The highest density of nesting Golden Eagles in the world lies in southern Alameda County, California. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their heads and necks. The Golden Eagle is a large, dark brown raptor with broad wings. Its size is variable: it ranges from 66 to 100 cm (26 to 39 in) in length and it has a typical wingspan of 1.8 to 2.34 m (5.9 to 7.7 ft). In the largest race (A. c. daphanea) males and females weigh 4.05 kg (8.9 lb) and 6.35 kg (14.0 lb). In the smallest subspecies (A. c. japonensis), the sexes weigh, respectively, 2.5 kg (5.5 lb) and 3.25 kg (7.2 lb). The maximum size of this species is a matter of some debate, although the normal upper weight limit for a large female is around 6.8 kg (15 lb) and large races are the heaviest representatives of the Aquila genus.

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Edited by Taipan, Jan 27 2012, 04:38 PM.
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Wolf Eagle
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If the Coyote dove down and hit the Coyote straight on with it's beak, I think it would win. Otherwise, if the Coyote got a good bite, it would injure the Eagle and the Eagle might not be able to get back up and fly away.
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Avianaves
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The golden eagle is capable of killing a coyote with a perfect aerial assult, however, on land the coyote would usually dominate though the eaglr can still intimidate it.
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Wolf Eagle
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Ya, Golden Eagles are huge. If it opened it's wings up really wide, it may intimidate the Coyote and might cause it to retreat.
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mohamad
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if they bigain the fight at ground coyote wil win!
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Taipan
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Asianaves
 
Golden eagle vs coyote.

The
predatory activities of both the
Golden Eagle (Aquila ckvysaftos) and the coyote (Canis &runs) are well known
, and it seems to be
commonly accepted that each obtains a good share of its food through predation. We know of no
written accounts of one preying on the other. However, agents of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and
Wildlife have reported that it is not uncommon for eagles to prey on coyotes in the puppy stage.

But observations indicate that at times Golden Eagles will attack mature coyotes. Two instances of
this were witnessed by agents in Nevada and the third was in an adjacent section of California.
On May 23, 1961, while aerial hunting for coyotes on the antelope kidding areas of the Charles
Sheldon Antelope Range located in northwestern Nevada, Hayden Purdy and T. C. Barber observed
an eagle attacking a coyote.
An adult coyote had been spotted standing above a rocky outcrop on a hillside. As the plane approached, the coyote began to move off in a trot. At this point a Golden Eagle flew past the plane in a steep dive and struck the coyote over the hips with both feet and con-
tinued on in flight.
The coyote was partially knocked to the ground. Recovering, it whirled, jumped,
biting in the direction of the eagle
which by now was gaining altitude. The men in the plane could
see a considerable amount of hair torn from the coyote’s back. The plane was then within range and the coyote was dispatched, unfortunately ending the observation. The eagle was not sighted again.

On November 16, 1961, near the southeast side of Honey Lake, Lassen County, California, Frank Schoengarth and Victor Vicendoa came on two coyotes and one Golden Eagle. The scene was set on
the dry alkali lake bed, approximately 75 yards from the sagebrush surrounding the lake bed at this point. From a distance the larger coyote and the eagle were observed within three to six feet of each
other. Each was obviously occupied in trying to bluff and outmaneuver the other for the dead jack rabbit lying between them. For about ten minutes an active battle was watched, the eagle feinting and jumping at the coyote with wings partly opened, ,and the coyote in return making passes at the eagle by quick short jumps with teeth bared. Neither would give ground until the coyote sensed the vehicle nearby. At this time the coyote left the scene at a fast trot for the sagebrush. The eagle imme-
diately became airborne and pursued the coyote, attacking in a series of dives.
The observers believed
the high brush kept the eagle from mating full contact with the coyote. Any resistance made by the coyote was done on the run, as it made no effort to stop and fight. Throughout this observation the
second coyote, a smaller animal, sat near the brush line watching the battle but not offering to par-ticipate, leaving only when the first became frightened and fled.

On March 5, 1963, another Golden Eagle was sighted making an attack on a coyote in White Pine County, Nevada. James C. Harris and Wendell Ross were engaged in aerial hunting for coyotes on
sheep lambing ranges in Long Valley.
In sagebrush and sand dune terrain a Golden Eagle was observed making dives on a coyote about 500 yards from the airplane. The plane was turned toward
the fight and during the time which elapsed before arrival at the location the eagle continued toattack. In the course of two attacks observed at close range the eagle came in contact with the coyote
but did not completely knock it down either time. Blood was evident on the coyote’s back and at the time of the second pass the coyote lost a considerable amount of hair. The coyote was traveling
at full speed at the time of both attacks and at no time made an effort to fight the bird or take cover.
Due to the nearness of the airplane the eagle stopped the attacks and moved on: This may have also
interfered with the coyote’s willingness to defend itself.

HOMER S. FORD and J. R. ALCORN, Bureau
of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Reno, Nevada, June 6, 1963.


Golden Eagle-Coyote Carcass Disputes - the Coyote Wins Easily

This study's reference is:

Journal of Mammalogy 61 (2) P 375-376, 1980

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Thanks reddhole 8-).





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I'm going for the Eagle!
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Mauro20
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The eagle has my vote.
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Taipan
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Some good pics of a carcass dispute here : http://jimmyjonesphotography.com/p351481419/hA6C55BA#ha6c55ba
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CandidPets
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Golden Eagle vs Coyote
This golden eagle was challanged three seperate times...

Golden Eagle vs Coyote
This golden eagle was challanged three seperate times...


Golden Eagle vs Coyote
...and three times he held his ground.





eagle will kill it on the ground also
Edited by CandidPets, Jul 8 2012, 02:48 AM.
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k9boy
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How would an eagle kill a coyote on the ground??
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CandidPets
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bind to its face

why do you think coyotes are scared to get close to an eagle on the ground? coyotes are smarter than just about any wild animal in north america they know a eagle will grab its snout and not let go if it gets close

thats why coyotes usually stay away from eagles on the ground if the coyote is by itself

do u know how a raptors feet work?


how come you been on this forum that long and u still have not learned anything??????????


when the eagle has the coytes face secure in its talons it can use its bill to do whatever it wants also like in this picture


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Edited by CandidPets, Jul 8 2012, 02:35 AM.
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CandidPets
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a 35 pound male coyote gets it foot stolen by a single golden eagle on the ground the risk isnt worth the food to this coyote so after they fight the coyote backs off, again the eagle trys to grab the coyote with its talons
Edited by CandidPets, Jul 8 2012, 02:39 AM.
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CandidPets
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[IMG][url]http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g62/TigerQuoll/PreviewBob2.jpg[/url][/IMG]



here it almost binds to a bobcat



smaller weaker bald eagle owning a coyote on the ground

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhLwN_xZju4


for a coyote a eagle does not need a stoop it will take care of it on the ground

a stoop is for big dogs and wolves

1 thing is coyotes are very very smart much smarter than any eagle they know the danger of messing with an eagle, nothing is smarter than a coyote not even a raven.

Edited by CandidPets, Jul 8 2012, 02:46 AM.
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k9boy
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I think the golden eagle wins aswell, but I'm not so sure about on the ground. What if it misses the coyotes muzzle?
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CandidPets
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FOUND another case a golden eagle steals a kill from a coyote

http://www.bobswildlifephotos.com/Wildlife/unusualbutnotgoodphotos/11488290_35Ks6h/815350356_yBjZb#!i=815349906&k=ccSj7

look at the picture the golden lands on the ground and keeps the coyote away while the eagle is on the ground


if the eagle misses the muzzle the coyote will run away the whole point is the eagle trys to grab the coyote the coyote is backing up to get away the eagle is ABOVE the single coyote in predator ranking as a single species it is VERY VERY rare for a coyote to displace a eagle on the ground by itself yes it has happend im sure but its rare

Coyotes do it when they are in pairs but if the eagle and coyote by themselves the eagle will always win aside from a few one in a thousand flukes coyotes are mostly in pairs or packs and can drive off eagles which are selfish and dont work together


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The golden has taken over and keeps the coyote from the kill.



Edited by CandidPets, Jul 8 2012, 06:34 AM.
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