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Who wins?
Spinosaurus aegyptiacus 24 (30%)
Tyrannosaurus rex 56 (70%)
Total Votes: 80
Spinosaurus aegyptiacus v Tyrannosaurus rex
Topic Started: Jan 7 2012, 02:16 AM (439,294 Views)
Wolf Eagle
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Tyrannosaurus rex
Tyrannosaurus is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning "king" in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is a fixture in popular culture. It lived throughout what is now western North America, with a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 67 to 65.5 million years ago.[1] It was among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to the large and powerful hindlimbs, Tyrannosaurus forelimbs were small, though unusually powerful for their size, and bore two clawed digits. Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded Tyrannosaurus rex in size, it was the largest known tyrannosaurid and one of the largest known land predators. By far the largest carnivore in its environment, Tyrannosaurus rex may have been an apex predator, preying upon hadrosaurs and ceratopsians, although some experts have suggested it was primarily a scavenger. The debate over Tyrannosaurus as apex predator or scavenger is among the longest running in paleontology. Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest land carnivores of all time; the largest complete specimen, FMNH PR2081 ("Sue"), measured 12.8 metres (42 ft) long, and was 4.0 metres (13.1 ft) tall at the hips. Mass estimates have varied widely over the years, from more than 7.2 metric tons (7.9 short tons), to less than 4.5 metric tons (5.0 short tons), with most modern estimates ranging between 5.4 and 6.8 metric tons (6.0 and 7.5 short tons). Packard et al. (2009) tested dinosaur mass estimation procedures on elephants and concluded that dinosaur estimations are flawed and produce over-estimations; thus, the weight of Tyrannosaurus could be much less than usually estimated. Other estimations have concluded that the largest known Tyrannosaurus specimens had a weight exceeding 9 tonnes.

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Spinosaurus aegyptiacus
Spinosaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur which lived in what is now North Africa, from the lower Albian to lower Cenomanian stages of the Cretaceous period, about 112 to 97 million years ago. Spinosaurus may be the largest of all known carnivorous dinosaurs, even larger than Tyrannosaurus and Giganotosaurus. Estimates published in 2005 and 2007 suggest that it was 12.6 to 18 metres (41 to 59 ft) in length and 7 to 20.9 tonnes (7.7 to 23.0 short tons) in weight. The skull of Spinosaurus was long and narrow like that of a modern crocodilian. Spinosaurus is thought to have eaten fish; evidence suggests that it lived both on land and in water like a modern crocodilian. The distinctive spines of Spinosaurus, which were long extensions of the vertebrae, grew to at least 1.65 meters (5.4 ft) long and were likely to have had skin connecting them, forming a sail-like structure, although some authors have suggested that the spines were covered in fat and formed a hump. Multiple functions have been put forward for this structure, including thermoregulation and display. Dal Sasso et al. (2005) assumed that Spinosaurus and Suchomimus had the same body proportions in relation to their skull lengths, and thereby calculated that Spinosaurus was 16 to 18 meters (52 to 59 ft) in length and 7 to 9 tonnes (7.7 to 9.9 short tons) in weight. The Dal Sasso et al. estimates were criticized because the skull length estimate was uncertain, and (assuming that body mass increases as the cube of body length) scaling Suchomimus which was 11 meters (36 ft) long and 3.8 tonnes (4.2 short tons) in mass to the range of estimated lengths of Spinosaurus would produce an estimated body mass of 11.7 to 16.7 tonnes (12.9 to 18.4 short tons).

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Edited by Taipan, Apr 24 2015, 10:10 PM.
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DinosaurMichael
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I'd say 50/50 but only because Spinosaurus has a size advantage, while T-Rex has better weaponry. If T-Rex is able to bite Spinosauurs by the neck. It wins. However if Spinosaurus can avoid that and use it's size. It would win.
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Wolf Eagle
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I think the Tyrannosaurus would win because Spinosaurus was more a fish eater and I don't think it was very good with fighting other large carnivores. But I do agree with DinoMike that it could win because of it's size. Otherwise, I think the Tyrannosaur would win.
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Pliosaur
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I favorise the tyrannosaurus rex over the spinosaurus because I think that the bite and the force of the T rex win over the size of spinosaurus.
I see more spinosaurus as egual as carchadontosaurus like show "planet dinosaur:the lost world"
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FireEel
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With the recent revisions to the max size of T.rex(from 7 tonnes > 9.5 tonnes or more), I give T.rex a very high chance of winning now.
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Wolf Eagle
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FireEel
Jan 7 2012, 11:01 PM
With the recent revisions to the max size of T.rex(from 7 tonnes > 9.5 tonnes or more), I give T.rex a very high chance of winning now.
It has a new maximum weight?
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genao87
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FireEel
Jan 7 2012, 11:01 PM
With the recent revisions to the max size of T.rex(from 7 tonnes > 9.5 tonnes or more), I give T.rex a very high chance of winning now.
that is just a calculation method that is new. it hasnt been applied to other dinosaurs yet.

if T.Rex weigh more then so would other dinosaurs under this new method of calculating weight. So far they have not calculated the weights of Spino, Giga, Carcha, or any other dino. Using also square cubes law, it is all pointing to a very large Spino which this new Calculating weight method is saying as well that the dinos were somewhat heavier.


As for byte force, it is believe that both Spino and T. Rex had about the same bought force, though T. Rex have some studies showing to be a bit higher than Spino.
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Apex
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I think spino would win due to size advantage
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Wolf Eagle
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apexpredator7
Jan 8 2012, 07:41 AM
I think spino would win due to size advantage
Yes but I don't think it was well built like the Tyrannosaurus. It may be larger, but the Tyrannosaurus is a better fighter seeing that it hunts large herbivores, unlike the Spinosaurus which had a mainly fish-based diet.
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Rodentsofunusualsize
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While I tend to agree that Rex would win, keep in mind that the fish that Spino hunted were massive armoured fish, and sharks.
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Wolf Eagle
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Yes but still. Even then. It had tools for that. And elongated jaw, and large arms with large claws. T-Rex however, had to hunt large herbivores without and tools except a big head packed with steak-knife like teeth.
Edited by Wolf Eagle, Jan 8 2012, 09:06 AM.
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Rodentsofunusualsize
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That doesn't make any sense, of course Rex had the proper tools for hunting, that's why it evolved them. Rex did not prey on any herbivores larger than itself to my knowledge, and it's main prey was the defenceless Hadrosaurs and the not so defenceless Ceratopsians.
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Wolf Eagle
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Rodentsofunusualsize
Jan 8 2012, 09:33 AM
That doesn't make any sense, of course Rex had the proper tools for hunting, that's why it evolved them. Rex did not prey on any herbivores larger than itself to my knowledge, and it's main prey was the defenceless Hadrosaurs and the not so defenceless Ceratopsians.
I meant that they did not have as many physical tools as the Spinosaurus, but yet they were able to tackle down much larger prey. Sorry if I mis-phrased my first reply.
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populator135
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At equal sizes, T.Rex no question. But at norman sizes, Spinosaurus is just too big.
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Drift
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Its bite is more than enough to take down spinosaurus so i'm going to have to say Tyrannosaurus would win this.
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