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Most Aggressive Feline Species
Tiger 6 (14.3%)
Lion 15 (35.7%)
Jaguar 2 (4.8%)
Leopard 8 (19%)
Cougar 1 (2.4%)
Cheetah 2 (4.8%)
Snow Leopard 0 (0%)
Eurasian Lynx 0 (0%)
Iberian Lynx 0 (0%)
Canadian Lynx 0 (0%)
Bobcat 1 (2.4%)
Caracal 1 (2.4%)
Serval 1 (2.4%)
Clouded Leopard 0 (0%)
Ocelot 0 (0%)
Wild Cat 4 (9.5%)
Other Feline Species 1 (2.4%)
Total Votes: 42
Most Aggressive Feline Species
Topic Started: Jan 12 2012, 10:20 AM (4,565 Views)
DinosaurMichael
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Apex Predator
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Aggression amongst feline species.

"Q: On Cat Aggression
Are all wild cats aggressive?


A: It depends on what you mean by aggression. Wild cats attack in order to obtain food, and also as a pre-emptive measure to drive away or destroy a threat. They don't attack just for the sake of it. Some individuals among the big cats may begin to see people as potential food and become man-eaters, particularly if the cat is incapacitated by injury or age. Most attacks on people take place when a cat is taken by surprise, feels threatened and even cornered. A female may attack to defend her cubs. Many times such an "attack" is just a scare tactic, and the cat swerves away without making physical contact. Even when there is physical contact in such cases, the victim is seldom eaten and may survive injuries.


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Q: I've heard that the tiger leads the big cats in number of attacks on people. Is this true? If so, is it because the tiger is the most aggressive of the big cats or is it just because it resides in India, where the population is so dense?

A: Tigers, lions and leopards are the only cats that can become a serious danger to humans, although in recent years cougars have killed or seriously injured people in the United States. The jaguar could be dangerous, but there are few records of attacks. I don't think there is any difference in the big cats' nature. Tigers certainly have a bad reputation, mainly because of reports from India, where British officials have publicized them as man-eaters, telling gory stories of hunting them down. Nowadays there is a highly active news media, which reports any attacks. In fact, it is only in the Sundarbans mangrove forests of India and Bangladesh that tiger attacks are fairly common; the reason for the aggressiveness has not been established. Leopards often live very close to people in the Indian subcontinent and attacks on people, particularly children, are not uncommon. Certainly the dense population in the subcontinent is a factor. Lions attack people in Africa, but there is little publicity because the media is not as developed as in India. As I said in answer to another question, "aggression" is usually a pre-emptive attack by a big cat that feels threatened by the surprise close approach of a human."

http://animal.discovery.com/fansites/wildkingdom/greatcats/expert/expert_3.html

Whilst considering attacks on humans, which cat species do you think displays the most aggression in is natural environment, against its own kind & its competitors?

Started by Dasyurus
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populator135
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Heterotrophic Organism
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Either the Leopard or the Lion.
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Megafelis Fatalis
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Tiger?
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Arctodus Simus
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Probably the Lion since it's the most social cat and it has its group to protect.
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Sicilianu
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I have had the fortune of meeting representatives of most of those species. I also know many anecdotal opinions from zoo keepers as well.

I would say the Black footed cat is perhaps the most aggressive. Scottish Wild cat is also known for its aggression. Regarding caracals, I have heard of some you could go in with and some you certainly should not go in with.

The large big cats are not particularly aggressive, IMO, although, my zoo keeper friends found Sumatran tigers and Asiatic lions to be very aggressive, more so than the rest of their species. My friends taught a jaguar male to roll over rather easily. I also worked with an Amur leopardess that was probably the most dangerous animal at the zoo; however, he might was quite placid, even though he has a record for killing females (the theory is that this female in particular was too aggressive for him to conquer).

In my experience, aggression in felids is inversely related to the duration or generations of human exposure or time spent in captivity.
Edited by Sicilianu, Feb 28 2012, 04:12 AM.
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ImperialDino
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Scottish Wildcats! their just small!!

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Scar
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Who the heck voted for the cheetah and jaguar? The tiger, lion and leopard are the most prolific man eaters among the feline family, with more recorded human deaths from any of the three then the rest of the feline family combined. Of the three, the tiger has killed the most people, or at least that's what I've read.
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boldchamp
Herbivore
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Here is my take on the matter. What correctly defines a more aggressive animal;

Quote:
 
An animal which is termed more aggressive, is basically, an animal that not only engages in more fights, but also the one most likely to have started the fights, in the first place, as well as the one generally pushing/initiating the first attacks once the fight has begun. This accurately describes a more aggressive animal, by definition;

Characterized by or tending toward unprovoked offensives, attacks, invasions, or the like; Quarrelsome (basically means the animal gets into more fights); Any offensive action, attack, or procedure; The practice of making assaults or attacks; Offensive action in general.


Personally, i think the lion is the more aggressive feline.

Here are some sources on the subject, comparing, of course, lions and tigers;


Quote:
 
This first source is from Melvin Sunquist, who is stated by many as being the leading tiger expert. For more info on Sunquist;

http://www.panthera.org/people/mel-sunquist

http://www.wec.ufl.edu/faculty/sunquistm/

Sunquist began his studies, in Chitwan, in 1974, and published this article by 1981. After 7 years, capturing, i believe, about 10 or so male tigers (mostly adults), and many females, as well (some were young), found that none bore any signs of having been into fights;

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Particularly note this section, as well;

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To recap, it says;

"I found no evidence of active defense of territories, although J.L.D. Smith (1978) has since recorded fights involving some of the same animals i monitored." This indicates that although tigers will fight, on occasion, it is by no means frequent. He also says; "Fights between males over estrous females have been reported (Baikov, 1925), but damaging encounters would seem maladaptive, as an injured animal may starve to death"

"Defense of territory need not, however, involve fighting and in many large mammalian carnivores the exclusive use of areas is maintained without frequent antagonistic encounters"

This part is the most conclusive, however;

"As pointed out by Geist (1971a), unless an animal can obtain enough energy over that required for maintenance and work, it will become a reproductive failure. A solitary predator, unlike a pack animal, relies on it`s physical well-being to secure food and thus cannot afford a serious injury (Ewer, 1973; Hornocker, 1969). So, while fighting may occasionally occur, it is not likely to be the principal mechanism for promoting or maintaining the spacial patterns observed in tigers"

This next source shows the conclusion from 3 separate sources;

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In this next source....neither tiger attempted to oust the other, though they were within hearing range of each other;

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This is unlike lions who do not allow other, nomadic lions, to feed or kill within their territory.

Lions have a well-defined territorial system;

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More on tigers....again from Sunquist;

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More on lions, from the leading lion expert, Packer;

http://www.cbs.umn.edu/eeb/lionresearch/research/groupliving.shtml

"In a set of experiments to resident males, Jon Grinnell found a similar sense of “numeracy” but the males sometimes approached even when outnumbered three to one—probably because male lions only have a brief opportunity to father offspring and are more likely to be suicidal in protecting their pride."

Even Thapar never came across a tiger that was injury, or which had died from fighting;

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More on the territorial fighting between tigers (left column);

http://books.google.com/books?id=0q5aHw2mFi8C&pg=PA263&dq=Tigers,+territorial+fighting,+Schaller&hl=en&ei=qQxhTaKkLcL48Aap5Y37Cw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CDcQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=Tigers%2C%20territorial%20fighting%2C%20Schaller&f=false

Even more data;

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Lions readily initiate aggression, regardless of the danger, when a valuable resource is threatened;

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Now, some of the reasons as to why a pride male might choose to confront a potential rival;

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Lion`s reaction to an invasion by another lion (click on it);

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More on tigers;

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Edited by boldchamp, Feb 28 2012, 12:18 PM.
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Elosha11
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The topic needs to be further defined. Some posters seems to believe "aggressive" refers to how readily a cat will attack humans; others indicate the term means how readily the feline will engage in intra-specific and inter-specific combat. I'm going to to view the topic as referring to the latter and say the lion is generally the most aggressive cat in combat.
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Nocturnal
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have to go with the lion as the most aggressive feline, like apparently most users do.
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boldchamp
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Attacking people really goes under the term of defensive-aggression, which any land carnivore will show on occasion.
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Sicilianu
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I assumed this was in relation to people; being self-centered creatures, I thought the topic revolved on feline aggression and man.

OP needs to decide what he means by aggression.
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ImperialDino
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Elosha11
Feb 28 2012, 02:04 PM
The topic needs to be further defined. Some posters seems to believe "aggressive" refers to how readily a cat will attack humans; others indicate the term means how readily the feline will engage in intra-specific and inter-specific combat. I'm going to to view the topic as referring to the latter and say the lion is generally the most aggressive cat in combat.
I agree, for example Leopards will attack animals they know they can easily overpower (jackal, serval), where as cougars will attack animals they cannot beat (mulitple wolves, bear), but people will say that the Leopard is more aggressive.
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Cat
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Elosha11
Feb 28 2012, 02:04 PM
The topic needs to be further defined. Some posters seems to believe "aggressive" refers to how readily a cat will attack humans; others indicate the term means how readily the feline will engage in intra-specific and inter-specific combat. I'm going to to view the topic as referring to the latter and say the lion is generally the most aggressive cat in combat.
You hit the nail on the head. There are many different ways to define aggression. And sometimes animal behavior seem apparently contradictory. For instance, it's very rare that wild jaguars attack humans, even if they are generally more powerful then leopards and cougars. Yet, they are perhaps the only felids that cannot be tamed, turning aggressive towards humans in adulthood even when raised in captivity as cubs. Lions - at least males - are probably the most aggressive in intra-specific relations, considering their social structure and way of life. But does that mean that they are the most aggressive in inter-specific situations as well?
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FireCrown
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Leopard they will come like right at you if disturbed
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