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White Rhinoceros v African Forest Elephant
Topic Started: Jan 28 2012, 01:31 PM (7,407 Views)
Taipan
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White Rhinoceros - Ceratotherium simum
The White Rhinoceros or Square-lipped rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) is one of the five species of rhinoceros that still exist. It has a wide mouth used for grazing and is the most social of all rhino species. White Rhinoceroses are found in grassland and savannah habitat. Herbivore grazers that eat grass, preferring the shortest grains, the White Rhinoceros is one of the largest pure grazers. White Rhinoceroses produce sounds which include a panting contact call, grunts and snorts during courtship, squeals of distress, and deep bellows or growls when threatened. Threat displays (in males mostly) include wiping its horn on the ground and a head-low posture with ears back, combined with snarl threats and shrieking if attacked. The White Rhinoceros is quick and agile and can run 50 km/h (31 mph). The White Rhinoceros is the world's largest land mammal after the three species of elephant. It has a massive body and large head, a short neck and broad chest. The head and body length is 3.4 to 4.2 m (11 to 14 ft), with the tail adding another 37 to 71 cm (15 to 28 in). Shoulder height is 1.5 to 2 m (4 ft 10 in to 6 ft 7 in). Weight in this animal typically ranges from 1,360 to 3,630 kg (3,000 to 8,000 lb). The male, averaging 2,300 kg (5,100 lb) is slightly heavier than the female, at an average of 1,700 kg (3,700 lb). The largest recorded White Rhinoceros was about 4,500 kg (9,900 lb). On its snout it has two horn-like growths, one behind the other. These are made of solid keratin, in which they differ from the horns of bovids (cattle and their relatives), which are keratin with a bony core, and deer antlers, which are solid bone. The front horn is larger and averages 90 cm (35 in) in length, reaching as much as 150 cm (59 in).

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African Forest Elephant - Loxodonta cyclotis
The African Forest Elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) is a forest dwelling elephant of the Congo Basin. Formerly considered either a synonym or a subspecies of the African Savanna Elephant (Loxodonta africana), a 2010 study established that the two are distinct species. These forest-dwelling elephants are smaller and darker than their savanna relatives and have smaller and characteristically rounded ears. The upper lip and nose are elongated into a trunk that is more hairy than that of the savanna elephants'. The male African Forest Elephant rarely exceed 2.5 metres (8 ft) in height, while the African Bush Elephant is usually over 3 meters (just under 10 feet) and sometimes almost 4 meters (13 ft) tall. With regard to the number of toenails: the African Bush Elephant normally has 4 toenails on the frontfoot and 3 on the hindfoot, the African Forest Elephant normally has 5 toenails on the frontfoot and 4 on the hindfoot (like the Asian elephant), but hybrids between the two species occur.
Male shoulder height: up to 2.5 m
Weight 2.7 - 6 tonnes

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___________________________________________________________________

Gregoire
 
African Forest elephant vs White rhino
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Superpredator
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yigit05
Sep 5 2012, 12:28 AM
african forest elephant size avantage,canine teeth<br />rhino big horn
What canine teeth?
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Black Ice
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At similiar weights
Rhinos>elephants
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Gregoire
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at parity elephants beats rhinos.
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Ursus panthera
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I would favour the rhino.
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Rammus
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Elephant would win. According to the size comparison it looks like the rhino can reach stab far with it's horn.
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Elephantus
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Black Ice
Sep 20 2012, 12:35 PM
At similiar weights
Rhinos>elephants
Can you please provide reasons for why? We have a number of cases of young elephants killing white rhinos...

http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-500164_162-226894.html


In South Africa's Pilanesberg Park, rhinos were thriving until an unknown killer began stalking them. Thirty-nine rhinos, 10 percent of the population in the park, were killed.

The killings clearly weren't the work of poachers. The rhinos' horns hadn't been touched. The park rangers began conducting an investigation. Their first findings led them to believe that if they were to round up the usual suspects, they'd need a pretty large holding pen.

That's because the prime suspects were not humans, but elephants. It turned out that young male elephants were behind the murders of Pilanesberg's rhinos.


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Mauro20
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Elephant wins.
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Carcharadon
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deleted comment
Edited by Carcharadon, Dec 22 2013, 11:37 AM.
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221Extra
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Elephantus
Sep 21 2012, 09:32 AM
Black Ice
Sep 20 2012, 12:35 PM
At similiar weights
Rhinos>elephants
Can you please provide reasons for why? We have a number of cases of young elephants killing white rhinos...

http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-500164_162-226894.html


In South Africa's Pilanesberg Park, rhinos were thriving until an unknown killer began stalking them. Thirty-nine rhinos, 10 percent of the population in the park, were killed.

The killings clearly weren't the work of poachers. The rhinos' horns hadn't been touched. The park rangers began conducting an investigation. Their first findings led them to believe that if they were to round up the usual suspects, they'd need a pretty large holding pen.

That's because the prime suspects were not humans, but elephants. It turned out that young male elephants were behind the murders of Pilanesberg's rhinos.


Who's to say those elephants weren't significantly bigger then the rhinos? I addressed that earlier in this thread anyways & forest elephant seems less formidable then bush its shorter & it's tusks appear to bow downwards which makes it ill suited for combat, the white rhinoceros is more then a match for the forest variety.
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Vodmeister
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Jan 29 2012, 07:19 PM
I think 221extra was right
Here is a size comparison
Posted Image
If that size comparison is correct, then I support the Rhinoceros in this fight.
Quote:
 
Elephant would win. According to the size comparison it looks like the rhino can reach stab far with it's horn.

Are you serious bro? lol

All the Rhino has to do is lift its head up. rolleyes
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Vodmeister
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Early on in the video two white rhinoceros fought a bush elephant and both held their own. In my opinion, I'd favor the rhino over a smaller forest elephant.
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Elephantus
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221extra
Sep 21 2012, 11:30 AM
Elephantus
Sep 21 2012, 09:32 AM
Black Ice
Sep 20 2012, 12:35 PM
At similiar weights
Rhinos>elephants
Can you please provide reasons for why? We have a number of cases of young elephants killing white rhinos...

http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-500164_162-226894.html


In South Africa's Pilanesberg Park, rhinos were thriving until an unknown killer began stalking them. Thirty-nine rhinos, 10 percent of the population in the park, were killed.

The killings clearly weren't the work of poachers. The rhinos' horns hadn't been touched. The park rangers began conducting an investigation. Their first findings led them to believe that if they were to round up the usual suspects, they'd need a pretty large holding pen.

That's because the prime suspects were not humans, but elephants. It turned out that young male elephants were behind the murders of Pilanesberg's rhinos.


Who's to say those elephants weren't significantly bigger then the rhinos? I addressed that earlier in this thread anyways & forest elephant seems less formidable then bush its shorter & it's tusks appear to bow downwards which makes it ill suited for combat, the white rhinoceros is more then a match for the forest variety.
Indeed, the exact size of those delinquent elephants is unkown to my knowledge. However, there are several charts on the growth rate of african bush elephants, and as seen, they are rather slow growers.

http://www.ceru.up.ac.za/downloads/Growth_and_age.pdf

Posted Image

A "juvenile" elephant like the ones responsible for attacking rhinos, are typically leaves is typically between 10-15 years of age and have shoulder heights quite a bit smaller then a fully grown adult. I'd imagine their weight not to far off from a white rhinoceros, although this is of course a guess. Furthermore, juvenile animals do tend to not be quite as formidable as their adult counterparts. Although not as powerful as then their savanna counterparts, I'm certain an adult of the forest species is more formidable then a juvenile of the other. Oh, and some of these forest elephants do seem to have pretty impressive tusks:


Posted Image

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DawnImperator
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I don't know why they'd be fighting anyway, but there have been cases of musth influenced elephants killing other animals in their rage, including rhinos. Size does matter, as the elephant can utilize its sheer weight to injure other species.
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tyrannotitan
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Rhino can stab elephants neck.
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221Extra
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Elephantus
Sep 21 2012, 01:50 PM
Indeed, the exact size of those delinquent elephants is unkown to my knowledge. However, there are several charts on the growth rate of african bush elephants, and as seen, they are rather slow growers.

http://www.ceru.up.ac.za/downloads/Growth_and_age.pdf

Posted Image

A "juvenile" elephant like the ones responsible for attacking rhinos, are typically leaves is typically between 10-15 years of age and have shoulder heights quite a bit smaller then a fully grown adult. I'd imagine their weight not to far off from a white rhinoceros, although this is of course a guess. Furthermore, juvenile animals do tend to not be quite as formidable as their adult counterparts. Although not as powerful as then their savanna counterparts, I'm certain an adult of the forest species is more formidable then a juvenile of the other. Oh, and some of these forest elephants do seem to have pretty impressive tusks:


Posted Image

I'm not trying to discredit your papers but they had to have been much bigger then the rhino, here's a quote from this article mentioning how one of the elephants killed a rhino:

"A park ranger said he had witnessed an elephant knocking a rhino over, trampling it and driving a tusk through its chest."

Those were no small elephant & yes the tusks of the forest elephant are impressive at least regarding size but they point downwards, which gives the rhinoceros the advantage.
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