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Who wins?
Tyrannosaurus rex 19 (65.5%)
Ankylosaurus magniventris 10 (34.5%)
Total Votes: 29
Tyrannosaurus rex v Ankylosaurus magniventris
Topic Started: Jan 28 2012, 10:08 PM (48,975 Views)
Taipan
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Tyrannosaurus rex
Tyrannosaurus is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning "king" in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is a fixture in popular culture. It lived throughout what is now western North America, with a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 67 to 65.5 million years ago. It was among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to the large and powerful hindlimbs, Tyrannosaurus forelimbs were small, though unusually powerful for their size, and bore two clawed digits. Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded Tyrannosaurus rex in size, it was the largest known tyrannosaurid and one of the largest known land predators. By far the largest carnivore in its environment, Tyrannosaurus rex may have been an apex predator, preying upon hadrosaurs and ceratopsians, although some experts have suggested it was primarily a scavenger. The debate over Tyrannosaurus as apex predator or scavenger is among the longest running in paleontology. Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest land carnivores of all time; the largest complete specimen, FMNH PR2081 ("Sue"), measured 12.8 metres (42 ft) long, and was 4.0 metres (13.1 ft) tall at the hips. Mass estimates have varied widely over the years, from more than 7.2 metric tons (7.9 short tons), to less than 4.5 metric tons (5.0 short tons), with most modern estimates ranging between 5.4 and 6.8 metric tons (6.0 and 7.5 short tons). Packard et al. (2009) tested dinosaur mass estimation procedures on elephants and concluded that dinosaur estimations are flawed and produce over-estimations; thus, the weight of Tyrannosaurus could be much less than usually estimated. Other estimations have concluded that the largest known Tyrannosaurus specimens had a weight exceeding 9 tonnes.

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Ankylosaurus magniventris
Ankylosaurus is a genus of ankylosaurid dinosaur, containing one species, A. magniventris. Fossils of Ankylosaurus are found in geologic formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period (about 66.5–65.5 Ma ago) in western North America. Although a complete skeleton has not been discovered and several other dinosaurs are represented by more extensive fossil material, Ankylosaurus is often considered the archetypal armored dinosaur. Other ankylosaurids shared its well-known features—the heavily-armored body and massive bony tail club—but Ankylosaurus was the largest known member of the family. In comparison with modern land animals the adult Ankylosaurus was very large. Some scientists have estimated a length of 9 meters (30 ft). Another reconstruction suggests a significantly smaller size, at 6.25 m (20.5 ft) long, up to 1.5 m (5 ft) wide and about 1.7 m (5.5 ft) high at the hip. Ankylosaurus may have weighed over 6,000 kilograms (13,000 lb), making it one of the heaviest armored dinosaurs yet discovered. The body shape was low-slung and quite wide. It was quadrupedal, with the hind limbs longer than the forelimbs. Although its feet are still unknown, comparisons with other ankylosaurids suggest Ankylosaurus probably had five toes on each foot. The skull was low and triangular in shape, wider than it was long. The largest known skull measures 64.5 centimeters (25 in) long and 74.5 cm (29 in) wide.

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Tyrannosaurus VS Ankylosaurus
Edited by Taipan, May 25 2018, 11:58 PM.
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DinosaurMichael
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I vote for Ankylosaurus. It would win almost everytime due to being heavily armored. Only way I could see T-Rex winning is by ambush or if not alone. Face to face. Ankylosaurus would be too much since they can turn very quick and would keep positioning itself over and over again.
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Megafelis Fatalis
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Tyrannosaurus Rex wins IMO
It has a size advantage + Powerful Bite
I think Tyrannosaurus was agile enough to avoid that tail of Ankylosaurus.
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Megafelis Fatalis
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It will end up like this
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SameerPrehistorica
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Tyrannosaurus - 75 % win / Ankylosaurus - 25 % win
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ShadowPredator
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I give this to the living tank
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Cat
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Some researchers said that 'Sue' (the biggest T-rex found so far) bore signs of healed fractures on one leg that could come from an Ankylosaur tail's blow. I'm not sure if this has been contested, but if it's true we have the proof that Anky could use its tail with devastating effect. Even if Sue survived, surely 'she' was not in condition to continue the fight. And she was a big specimen. Conceding the usual uncertainty that goes with extinct animals, I vote for the ankylosaurus in a one-on-one fight. It's possible that the T-rex hunted in pairs or even in small group and in this case they might have had a serious chance to kill the armored dino, albeit at risk. Maybe that is what happened with Sue, and it would explain why she survived, being able to feed from the catch of the buddies.
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Apex
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ankylosaurus face to face trex had no chance
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Megafelis Fatalis
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apexpredator7
Jan 29 2012, 05:10 AM
ankylosaurus face to face trex had no chance
did you see the size comparison?
Tyrannosaurus would beat Ankylosaurus easily
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Apex
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nah ankylosaurus had the club and armour one swing and trex is lame
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Megafelis Fatalis
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apexpredator7
Jan 29 2012, 05:22 AM
nah ankylosaurus had the club and armour one swing and trex is lame
Anlylosaurus was a slow animal, and it needs a lucky hit to end the tyrannosaurus.
Tyrannosaurus had a powerful bite, and i think it was agile enough to avoid Ankylosaurus's tail.
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Taurus
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Trex do prey on Ankylosaurus from time to time as it cannot be that hard for a Trex to kill an Ankylosaurus by crush its skull.
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Apex
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but this is face to face not ambush
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Drift
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That chart really does weigh in favor of Tyrannosaurus when the Anky. isn't the 3 story beast its portrayed in most dinosaur media
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Superpredator
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Tyrannosaurus would NOT beat this beast easily. See t.rex is getting overrated again. Ankylo is a walking tank. I know t.rex had a strong bite but do you really expect him to bite through that armour? And even if he could do you think ankylosaurus will let t.rex happily bite through his armour when he has a club at the end of his tail? And the only soft spot on the ankylo is his belly and t.rex certainly couldn't flip ankylo with those arms. So all in all ankylo would win 8/10
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