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Who wins?
Siberian Tiger 66 (43.7%)
Eurasian Brown Bear 85 (56.3%)
Total Votes: 151
Siberian Tiger v Eurasian Brown Bear
Topic Started: Feb 5 2012, 08:13 PM (77,125 Views)
Taipan
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Siberian Tiger - Panthera tigris altaica
The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), also known as the Amur tiger, is a tiger subspecies inhabiting mainly the Sikhote Alin mountain region with a small subpopulation in southwest Primorye province in the Russian Far East. In 2005, there were 331–393 adult-subadult Amur tigers in this region, with a breeding adult population of about 250 individuals. The Siberian tiger is reddish-rusty or rusty-yellow in colour, with narrow black transverse stripes. Measurements taken by scientists of the Siberian Tiger Project in Sikhote-Alin range from 178 to 208 cm (70 to 82 in) in head and body length measured in straight line, with an average of 195 cm (77 in) for males; and for females ranging from 167 to 182 cm (66 to 72 in) with an average of 174 cm (69 in). The average tail measures 99 cm (39 in) in males and 91 cm (36 in) in females. The longest male “Maurice” measured 309 cm (122 in) in total length (tail of 101 cm (40 in)) and had a chest girth of 127 cm (50 in). The longest female “Maria Ivanna” measured 270 cm (110 in) in total length (tail of 88 cm (35 in)) and had a chest girth of 108 cm (43 in). These measurements show that the present Amur tiger is longer than the Bengal tiger and the African lion. According to modern research of wild Siberian tigers in Sikhote-Alin, an average adult male of more than 35 months of age weighs 176.4 kg (389 lb), the average asymptotic limit being 222.3 kg (490 lb); an adult tigress weighs 117.9 kg (260 lb). The mean weight of historical Siberian tigers is supposed to be higher: 215.3 kg (475 lb) for male tigers and 137.5 kg (303 lb) for females. In May 2011, a male called “Banzai” weighing 207 kg (460 lb) was radio-collared. This individual is heavier but smaller in size than a previously radio-collared male. The largest male, with largely assured references, measured 350 cm (140 in) "over curves", equivalent to 330 cm (130 in) between pegs. The tail length in fully grown males is about 1 m (39 in). Weights of up to 318 kg (700 lb) have been recorded and exceptionally large males weighing up to 384 kg (850 lb) are mentioned in the literature but, according to Mazák, none of these cases can be confirmed via reliable sources.

Posted Image

Eurasian Brown Bear - Ursus arctos arctos
The Eurasian brown bear (Ursus arctos arctos) is a subspecies of brown bear, found across northern Eurasia. The Eurasian brown bear is also known as the common brown bear, European brown bear and colloquially by many other names. The Eurasian brown bear has brown fur, which can range from yellow-brownish to dark brown, red brown, and almost black in some cases; albinism has also been recorded. The fur is dense to varying degree and the hair can grow up to 10 cm in length. The shape of the head is normally quite round with relatively small and round ears, a wide skull and a mouth equipped with 42 teeth, including predatory teeth. It has a powerful bone structure, large paws, equipped with big claws, which can grow up to 10 cm in length. The weight varies depending on habitat and time of the year. A full grown male weighs on average 265–355 kg (583–780 lb). The largest Eurasian brown bear recorded was 481 kg (1,058 lb) and was nearly 2.5 m (8.2 ft) long. Females typically range between 150–250 kg (330–550 lb).

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Gregoire
Feb 5 2012, 04:00 PM
Tiger vs Brown Bear
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Gregoire
Omnivore
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I think at parity 55/45 tiger or 60/40. At max weights 700 kg Kodiak vs 300 kg Tiger 72/25 Kodiak.
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Megafelis Fatalis
Carnivore
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Eurasian Brown Bear wins IMO
Size advantage + Long Claws + Powerful arms & Shoulders + Thick fur
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Rodentsofunusualsize
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cogcaptainduck
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A Kodiak would be a mismatch, but at parity it's 50/50.
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Bull and Terrier
Herbivore
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At parity it would be a mismatch in favour of the tiger. The bear needs atleast 100 pounds weight advantadge to make it a contest. And when did eurasian bears get that big? I Norway and Sweden the largest males get 300kg and I think that is in autumn. Most females around 150kg.

Tiger is more explosive at similar weights, carry more muzzle, much stronger jaws, more flexible, more agile, faster, more aggresive and not e great diffrence in size. Male vs male, tiger, female vs female, tiger. Male bear vs female tiger, bear
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populator135
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Heterotrophic Organism
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The tiger has a better record in recorded confrontations so I will vote for it.
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DinosaurMichael
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I vote Bear. Bigger, bigger claws, and really powerful. Not that the Tiger won't go down easy, but it will give the Bear trouble.
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Superpredator
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Classic match normally I would give it to the bear but at parity I'll have to say tiger so normal weights bear parity tiger
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Warsaw
Unicellular Organism
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"At parity it would be a mismatch in favour of the tiger. The bear needs atleast 100 pounds weight advantadge to make it a contest. And when did eurasian bears get that big? I Norway and Sweden the largest males get 300kg and I think that is in autumn. Most females around 150kg.."
Bull and Terrier.What are your qualifications for delivering such statements ?
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Warsaw
Unicellular Organism
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"The tiger has a better record in recorded confrontations so I will vote for it. "
Tigers are omnivores who spend the winter sleeping in a den ?


Anyway that depends on how you look at it.
"...During drought years in the eastern portions of Russia,
low precipitation resulted in poor forage production and
increased bear-human conflicts. When these conditions
exist, bears in poor physical condition approach settlements
and prey on livestock and humans.During 1962, one of the worst bear food years on record,
767 brown bears were shot in Tuva (south-central Siberia)
and >200 died due to cannibalism by other bears.
Wildlife officials estimated about 67% of the population
was eliminated from this region in 1 year (Zyryanov and
Smimov 1992). A similar situation was observed in 1984
in Magadan Oblast (north-eastern Russia) and in other
regions of Russia (M.A. Krechmar, Institute of Biology
of the North, Magadan, Russia, pers. commun., 1991).
During these catastrophic food years, bear conflicts
were not easily solved by removing nuisance bears because
nearly all bears were involved in conflicts. Food
availability conflicts in Russia were alleviated (partially)
by providing an artificial food supply..."
Edited by Warsaw, Feb 7 2012, 07:29 AM.
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ShadowPredator
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populator135
Feb 6 2012, 06:56 AM
The tiger has a better record in recorded confrontations so I will vote for it.
But bear is huge.....
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populator135
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Heterotrophic Organism
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Since when do tigers hibernate Warsaw ?

I know the bear is huge ShadowPredator. It still however was on the loosing side more often than not.
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ShadowPredator
Omnivore
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How, all it has is better killingweaponry, and a better desire to kill;
Bear has Size, longer claws, Strength, ect.
I see the tiger winning against a small female or juvenile; the tiger is toast if it is Male vs Male
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firefly
Herbivore
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Populator ( did you read the old thread of brown bear vs tiger at all? It had loads of interesting data):

So you didn´t got the Warsaw´s point?

And I would like to know the data that you are talking about, care to share with us, please?

Thanks.


And the Siberian tiger predation data on brown bear, is not really that impressive in my opinion. Having in mind that tigers are more predatory, that usually can escape from brown bears and evade from conflicts, that can surprise them in an hibernation den, that can ambush more frequently and consequently choose their fights, how in all these years, of investigation, none was reported to kill a bear bigger than himself, when could use all the advantage elements to win? And how none was reported to kill an adult male brown bear?

And we are talking about Siberian brown bears ( Ussurian) not Kamchatkan or coastal Alaskan sized ones.

Regarding adult animals conflict ( and not data about tigers killing bear cubs and count that as evidence of something for a thread like this one), honestly I find more surprising the fact about brown bears killing tigers ( for the facts mentioned above).


The best case scenario for your stance, was about an adult male siberian tiger killing a sow smaller than himself by ambush... A 175 kgs brown bear...

It seems, in my opinion, that both species clearly benefict somehow from being sympathric. Both kill the old, injured, sick or young of each other and therefore improve their own genetic basis. It´s like a long life contract.





Edited by firefly, Feb 7 2012, 01:20 PM.
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populator135
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLgOJvbawmA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-ieNJWMX38&feature=related
And the data from the old discussions on the thread. The first video, which is in russian, states that tigers usually win in confrontations.
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