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Cape Leopard v Brown Hyena
Topic Started: Feb 24 2012, 05:13 PM (3,799 Views)
Taipan
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Cape Leopard - Panthera pardus melanotica
The leopard, Panthera pardus, is a member of the Felidae family and the smallest of the four "big cats" in the genus Panthera, the other three being the tiger, lion, and jaguar .Cape Leopards or Panthera Pardus Melanotica are much smaller than the African Leopard (Panthera Pardus) found in the Kruger National Park. These have an average weight of 61kg for males, while their Cape counterparts average just over half that. In the Western Cape, leopards are significantly smaller, males averaging 32 kg and females 20 kg, which makes them in many instances smaller than a large male Caracal.

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Brown Hyena - Hyaena brunnea
The brown hyena (Hyaena brunnea, formerly Parahyaena brunnea) is a species of hyena which occurs in Namibia, Botswana, western and southern Zimbabwe, southern Mozambique and South Africa. Brown hyenas can measure 86 to 150 cm (34 to 59 in) in head-and-body length, although they average 110 to 125 cm (43 to 49 in). The height at the shoulder is 71 to 88 cm (28 to 35 in) and the tail is 25 to 35 cm (9.8 to 14 in) long. Unlike the larger spotted hyena, there are no sizable differences between the sexes, though males may be slightly larger than the females. The average adult male weighs 40.2 to 43.7 kg (89 to 96 lb), while the average female weighs 37.7 to 40.2 kg (83 to 89 lb). The normal upper weight limit for the species is 55 kg (120 lb), although an occasional outsized specimen can weigh up to 67.6 to 72.6 kg (149 to 160 lb). Brown hyenas are primarily scavengers, the bulk of their diet consisting of carcasses killed by larger predators, though they may supplement their diet with rodents, insects, eggs and fruit. However, brown hyenas are aggressive scavengers, frequently appropriating the kills of black-backed jackals, cheetahs, and leopards, including adult male leopards.

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Gregoire
Feb 24 2012, 03:28 AM
brown hyena vs cape leopard
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Replies:
mohamad
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Wild Dog
Jun 20 2012, 05:52 AM
mohamad
Jun 20 2012, 05:43 AM
ImperialDino
Feb 25 2012, 12:06 PM
Brown Hyena defeats the small leopard species.
and the originale leopards too
your kidding right? A 96 lb. hyena vs a 130 lb. tom leopard. That would most certainly be a mismatch
no i dont kiding you brown hyena chasing leopard some time if you want i can put some records
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mohamad
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k9boy
Jun 20 2012, 07:24 AM
mohamad
Jun 20 2012, 05:43 AM
ImperialDino
Feb 25 2012, 12:06 PM
Brown Hyena defeats the small leopard species.
and the originale leopards too
lol Good one
in a fight to the death african leopard wins but in many conflict the brown hyena chasing it. hyena is one of the animals that very difficult to kills it
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k9boy
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Yes because they are very cautious, why take the risk? An african leopard would kill a brown hyena pretty quickly if it wanted too.
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Canidae
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k9boy
Jul 1 2012, 01:22 AM
Yes because they are very cautious, why take the risk? An african leopard would kill a brown hyena pretty quickly if it wanted too.
I don't think it would, due to the hyaenas extreme durability and how hard it would be to subdue a hyaena in a frontal fight.
Hyaenas possess very large, strong, well-developed necks, shoulders and forelimbs as adaptations to tearing apart prey and carrying heavy loads over long distances swiftly. The tradeoff for this is that they lack the neccesary developments for high speeds, dexterity and appropriate dexterity to abduct / subdue prey or competitors in a fight with their limbs (not overall) hence why hyaenas, in fights with each other or prey don't rear up, grapple, wrestle or jump about, etc as felids or to lesser extents canids do. When the attack they keep all feet on the ground as an anchor and then their impressive jaws to grab and maul prey keeping it steady and shaking it with such a long, strong neck.
These adaptations mean that, whilst a hyaena doesn't grapple and lacks dexterity it is very hard to pull to the ground / subdue. This, complete with durability, powerful jaws that can A.) Quickly crush bone and B.) Have a very high R-shift (higher than a Leopards) mean that hyaenas should not be under-rated in a fight.
I do back the Brownie at parity too, but not by much nor as much as I would back a female Spotted.
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k9boy
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What is an R-shift?
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k9boy
Jul 1 2012, 02:01 AM
What is an R-shift?
R-shift is discussed on this thread :) - http://carnivoraforum.com/topic/9560831/1/
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Kurtz
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we must consider this (FROM CHUI)
However, even female leopards may occasionally defend their kills. As this account originally from Jonathan Scott provided in the book, "Wildcats of the World" by the Sunquists shows. Impressive display of strength by this female.

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Altough a female leopard in Masai Mara or Kruger could be larger than male leopard in kalahari or than a cape leopard
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k9boy
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That is the account that i mentioned in another thread. I have that book, its a good read.
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Bandog
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Everything else is just a dog.
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I rate spotted and brown hyenas ahead of stripeds as far as adapted for sustained combat. With its weight advantage a brown hyena would dispatch the cape leopard handily.
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Kurtz
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Altough a female leopard with 13,6 kilos or 30 pounds of disadvantage can win the fight against a spotted hyena
Edited by Kurtz, Jul 1 2012, 06:04 AM.
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CandidPets
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i dont know about leopards being "cautious" they have no problems taking out peoples guard dogs in india and eating them if the dogs dont wear a spiked collar something about hyenas scare leopards. When my grandfather worked near nepal mountains leopards is how most serious guard dogs died. It seems to happen all over. So there is something about hyenas that prevents leopards from killing them often. I dont think a throat hold a leopard uses will work on a hyena and i dont think their claws are as leather on hyena tough thick hide and powerful muscles. Otherwise leopards would have killed them like they do big dogs.


Coyotes and big cats have also been known to attack dogs. Leopards in particular are known to have a predilection for dogs, and have been recorded to kill and consume them regardless of the dog's size or ferocity.[136] Tigers in Manchuria, Indochina, Indonesia, and Malaysia are reputed to kill dogs with the same vigor as leopards.


Scott, Jonathan & Scott, Angela (2006). Big Cat Diary: Leopard. London: Collins. p. 108. ISBN 0-00-721181-3.
Edited by CandidPets, Jul 1 2012, 12:19 PM.
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mohamad
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k9boy
Jul 1 2012, 01:22 AM
Yes because they are very cautious, why take the risk? An african leopard would kill a brown hyena pretty quickly if it wanted too.
how its quickly ??? look for this video a leopard takes a long time to kills a baby hyena so how will kills an adult brown hyena "quickly". its very difficult to kills a hyena because his body is very powerful and its very defensive specially his nick. and wi watched many video of a male lions take a long time to kills a hyena
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mohamad
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Kurtz
Jul 1 2012, 06:03 AM
Altough a female leopard with 13,6 kilos or 30 pounds of disadvantage can win the fight against a spotted hyena
what??? lol :D
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mohamad
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Canidae
Jul 1 2012, 01:49 AM
k9boy
Jul 1 2012, 01:22 AM
Yes because they are very cautious, why take the risk? An african leopard would kill a brown hyena pretty quickly if it wanted too.
I don't think it would, due to the hyaenas extreme durability and how hard it would be to subdue a hyaena in a frontal fight.
Hyaenas possess very large, strong, well-developed necks, shoulders and forelimbs as adaptations to tearing apart prey and carrying heavy loads over long distances swiftly. The tradeoff for this is that they lack the neccesary developments for high speeds, dexterity and appropriate dexterity to abduct / subdue prey or competitors in a fight with their limbs (not overall) hence why hyaenas, in fights with each other or prey don't rear up, grapple, wrestle or jump about, etc as felids or to lesser extents canids do. When the attack they keep all feet on the ground as an anchor and then their impressive jaws to grab and maul prey keeping it steady and shaking it with such a long, strong neck.
These adaptations mean that, whilst a hyaena doesn't grapple and lacks dexterity it is very hard to pull to the ground / subdue. This, complete with durability, powerful jaws that can A.) Quickly crush bone and B.) Have a very high R-shift (higher than a Leopards) mean that hyaenas should not be under-rated in a fight.
I do back the Brownie at parity too, but not by much nor as much as I would back a female Spotted.
look for this video of leopard takes a long time to kills the baby hyena because of his defensive nick and body and i commented on this video see it
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k9boy
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Canidea, I believe male leopards and female hyenas have equal neck strength, have a look at the video I posted on 'Big cats vs suids compendium' The male leopard holds a thrashing warthog using only his powerful neck, Not his paws.

Brown hyenas have got too 160lbs before, would you favour one that size against a 160lb male leopard?
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