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Who wins?
Honey Badger 22 (51.2%)
African Rock Python 21 (48.8%)
Total Votes: 43
Honey Badger v African Rock Python
Topic Started: Mar 11 2012, 04:31 PM (9,990 Views)
Taipan
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Honey Badger - Mellivora capensis
The honey badger (Mellivora capensis), also known as the ratel, is a species of mustelid native to Africa, the Middle East and the Indian Subcontinent. Despite its name, the honey badger does not closely resemble other badger species, instead bearing more anatomical similarities to weasels. It is classed as Least Concern by the IUCN due to its extensive range and general environmental adaptations. It is a primarily carnivorous species, and has few natural predators due to its thick skin and ferocious defensive abilities. The honey badger has a fairly long body, but is distinctly thick set and broad across the back. Its skin is remarkably loose, and allows it to turn and twist freely within it. The skin around the neck is 6 millimetres (0.24 in) thick, an adaptation to fighting conspecifics. The head is small and flat, with a short muzzle. The eyes are small, and the ears are little more than ridges on the skin, another possible adaptation to avoiding damage while fighting. The honey badger has short and sturdy legs, with five toes on each foot. The feet are armed with very strong claws, which are short on the hind legs and remarkably long on the forelimbs. It is a partially plantigrade animal whose soles are thickly padded and naked up to the wrists. The tail is short and is covered in long hairs, save for below the base. Adults measure 23 to 28 centimetres (9.1 to 11 in) in shoulder height and 68–75 cm in body length, with females being smaller than males. Males on average weigh 12 kg (up to 16 kilograms) (26 to 35 lb) while females weigh 9.1 kg.

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African Rock Python - Python sebae
Python sebae, commonly known as the African rock python, is a large, nonvenomous snake of Sub-Saharan Africa. The African rock python is one of seven species in the genus Python. It has two subspecies: one found in Central and Western Africa, the other in Southern Africa. Africa's largest snake, specimens may approach or exceed 6 m (20 ft). The southern subspecies is generally smaller than its northern relative. The animal has a pattern of colored blotches on its body. It has dual lungs and vestigial hind limbs, which show it is less advanced in evolution than other snakes. The snake is found in a variety of habitats, from forests to near deserts, although usually near sources of water. The African rock python kills its prey by constriction and often eats animals up to the size of antelope, occasionally even crocodiles. The snake reproduces by egg-laying. Unlike most snakes, the female will protect her nest and sometimes even her hatchlings. The snake is widely feared even though it only very rarely kills humans. Although the snake is not endangered, it does face threats from habitat reduction and hunting.

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DinosaurMichael
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This is a huge mismatch in favor of the Snake. What is the Honey Badger going to do? This Snake takes down animals larger such as antelope. Honey Badgers are so overrated. I vote Python.
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1futuremarine1
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Mismatch imo.
Infavor of the honey badger. All hail the honey badger.

Just kidding, in favor of the african rock python. Honey badgers hunt and kill large snakes, but a rock python is simply too large imo. Unless the Badger can grab the head of the snake immediatetly and kill it, it will likely lose.

Honey badge male: 28 lbs: 13kg
African Rock python female: 120 lbs: 55 - 90 kg
African Rock python Male: 100 lbs: 45 - 70 kg
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DinosaurMichael
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1futuremarine1
Mar 12 2012, 12:56 AM
Mismatch imo.
Infavor of the honey badger. All hail the honey badger.

Just kidding, in favor of the african rock python. Honey badgers hunt and kill large snakes, but a rock python is simply too large imo. Unless the Badger can grab the head of the snake immediatetly and kill it, it will likely lose.

Honey badge male: 28 lbs: 13kg
African Rock python female: 120 lbs: 55 - 90 kg
African Rock python Male: 100 lbs: 45 - 70 kg
How big are the Snakes they kill and are they adults that are bigger than them?
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Cat
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It sees the HB can kill pythons larger then itself. On the old forum, if I remember correctly, it was said that a HB preyed on a 3 m (10 feet) python. In the following video it's difficult to estimate the length of the snake, but it's clearly much larger than the mustelid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENQ7CCeMKIA



Clearly at max size an ARP would be too much for a ratel, especially the larger northern subspecies. But it can well be that the HB can kill an average sized python.
Edited by Taipan, Mar 12 2012, 11:07 AM.
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DinosaurMichael
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Cat
Mar 12 2012, 01:34 AM
It sees the HB can kill pythons larger then itself. On the old forum, if I remember correctly, it was said that a HB preyed on a 3 m (10 feet) python. In the following video it's difficult to estimate the length of the snake, but it's clearly much larger than the mustelid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENQ7CCeMKIA

Clearly at max size an ARP would be too much for a ratel, especially the larger northern subspecies. But it can well be that the HB can kill an average sized python.
Was it a ARP though or a different species of Python?
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Cat
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DinosaurMichael
Mar 12 2012, 01:37 AM
Cat
Mar 12 2012, 01:34 AM
It sees the HB can kill pythons larger then itself. On the old forum, if I remember correctly, it was said that a HB preyed on a 3 m (10 feet) python. In the following video it's difficult to estimate the length of the snake, but it's clearly much larger than the mustelid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENQ7CCeMKIA

Clearly at max size an ARP would be too much for a ratel, especially the larger northern subspecies. But it can well be that the HB can kill an average sized python.
Was it a ARP though or a different species of Python?
From the size and the location I think it's an ARP. The other two species of African pythons are much smaller. The Angolan python (P. anchietae) can reach 6 feet but it's rare and limited to a relatvely small area in S. Angola and N. Namibia. The other species, P. regius doesn't live in S. Africa, it's even smaller and generally doesn't exceed 4 feet. The video caption says that it was an ARP and the event took place in the Kruger Park, where it is the only python species.
Edited by Cat, Mar 12 2012, 03:24 AM.
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DinosaurMichael
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Cat
Mar 12 2012, 03:19 AM
DinosaurMichael
Mar 12 2012, 01:37 AM
Cat
Mar 12 2012, 01:34 AM
It sees the HB can kill pythons larger then itself. On the old forum, if I remember correctly, it was said that a HB preyed on a 3 m (10 feet) python. In the following video it's difficult to estimate the length of the snake, but it's clearly much larger than the mustelid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENQ7CCeMKIA

Clearly at max size an ARP would be too much for a ratel, especially the larger northern subspecies. But it can well be that the HB can kill an average sized python.
Was it a ARP though or a different species of Python?
From the size I think it should be an ARP. The other two species of African pythons are much smaller. The Angolan python (P. anchietae) can reach 6 feet but it's rare and limited to a relatvely small area in S. Angola and N. Namibia. The other species, P. regius, is even smaller and generally doesn't exceed 4 feet.
Oh alright then just asked.
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1futuremarine1
Mar 12 2012, 12:56 AM
Mismatch imo.
Infavor of the honey badger. All hail the honey badger.

Just kidding, in favor of the african rock python. Honey badgers hunt and kill large snakes, but a rock python is simply too large imo. Unless the Badger can grab the head of the snake immediatetly and kill it, it will likely lose.

Honey badge male: 28 lbs: 13kg
African Rock python female: 120 lbs: 55 - 90 kg
African Rock python Male: 100 lbs: 45 - 70 kg
agree, as long it's isn't a very small rock phyton.
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Cephalopholis
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That video is just a honey badger gnawing on the corpes of ARP hung over a branch. No evidence that it was killed by the Badger. Hanging on that branch is hardly the defensive position a python would take. I would guess people, perhaps the ones filming placed the snake there to attract other animals. Also I would say if the snakes bigger its only slightly.
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Taipan
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DinosaurMichael
Mar 12 2012, 12:36 AM
This is a huge mismatch in favor of the Snake. What is the Honey Badger going to do? This Snake takes down animals larger such as antelope. Honey Badgers are so overrated. I vote Python.


No, its a not a huge mismatch.


Here's another vid of a Honey Badger killing an adult Rock Python (around 4 and a half meters).

"Living up to its name, this clip is another from their remarkable Caught in the Act series. In it a Honey badger takes on an adult southern African python. Grossly outmatched in both size and weight, you’d think the much smaller animal wouldn’t stand a chance against such a formidable opponent. Had it been the middle of the day – and hot – you’d be right. But unfortunately for this snake, its fearless attacker came upon it at night when its cold blood had slowed its movements down to something approximating molasses."
http://blog.malamala.com/index.php/2011/11/honey-badger-takes-on-a-python/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WDmr_2YjzqU

Edited by Taipan, Mar 12 2012, 11:12 AM.
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1futuremarine1
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Taipan
Mar 12 2012, 10:54 AM
DinosaurMichael
Mar 12 2012, 12:36 AM
This is a huge mismatch in favor of the Snake. What is the Honey Badger going to do? This Snake takes down animals larger such as antelope. Honey Badgers are so overrated. I vote Python.


No, its a not a huge mismatch.


Here's another vid of a Honey Badger killing an adult Rock Python (around 4 and a half meters).

"Living up to its name, this clip is another from their remarkable Caught in the Act series. In it a Honey badger takes on an adult southern African python. Grossly outmatched in both size and weight, you’d think the much smaller animal wouldn’t stand a chance against such a formidable opponent. Had it been the middle of the day – and hot – you’d be right. But unfortunately for this snake, its fearless attacker came upon it at night when its cold blood had slowed its movements down to something approximating molasses."
http://blog.malamala.com/index.php/2011/11/honey-badger-takes-on-a-python/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WDmr_2YjzqU

And now I feel stupid.
I, would never have thought that even the formidable Honey Badger could take such a massive snake (massive relative to it's own size). I eman there is no excuse for a snake that large losing to such a small animal. Even at night when they are rather sluggish.
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Superpredator
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^Was that sarcasm?
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Cat
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Well. the S. African veld can be quite cold at night. The snake was almost unable to move. Still, I agree that for such a small creature to kill a 4,5 m python is extremely impressive.
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Taipan
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1futuremarine1
Mar 12 2012, 02:21 PM
Taipan
Mar 12 2012, 10:54 AM
DinosaurMichael
Mar 12 2012, 12:36 AM
This is a huge mismatch in favor of the Snake. What is the Honey Badger going to do? This Snake takes down animals larger such as antelope. Honey Badgers are so overrated. I vote Python.


No, its a not a huge mismatch.


Here's another vid of a Honey Badger killing an adult Rock Python (around 4 and a half meters).

"Living up to its name, this clip is another from their remarkable Caught in the Act series. In it a Honey badger takes on an adult southern African python. Grossly outmatched in both size and weight, you’d think the much smaller animal wouldn’t stand a chance against such a formidable opponent. Had it been the middle of the day – and hot – you’d be right. But unfortunately for this snake, its fearless attacker came upon it at night when its cold blood had slowed its movements down to something approximating molasses."
http://blog.malamala.com/index.php/2011/11/honey-badger-takes-on-a-python/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WDmr_2YjzqU

And now I feel stupid.
I, would never have thought that even the formidable Honey Badger could take such a massive snake (massive relative to it's own size). I eman there is no excuse for a snake that large losing to such a small animal. Even at night when they are rather sluggish.


I'd always though 3 meters would be too large, so this video has now changed that:

From the HB profile:

Kifaru
 
•We must have spent most of the morning with these beautiful spotted cats before we headed to a nearby hill for a pit stop. There our ranger found the track of a large python! We followed it to another hill and found the snake badly injured. At first we thought it was dead, but as we approached it became clear that there was still some life in the feisty creature. After a bit of investigation it became clear that a honey badger was to blame for the injuries and shortly after we found two of these curious looking animals not far from where their victim lay


Kifaru
 
•A large dead python was found, the rangers say its cause of death was by a honey badger, which is surprisingly hard to believe, as this python was three meters long. But honey badgers are fearless; they display considerable aggression and have a powerful bite. Their loose skin enables them to turn easily upon anything that attempts to take hold of them.


Kifaru
 
•The most amazing sight this morning was a honey badger catching and eating an almost three meter long python. The badger had eaten a substantial part of the middle section of the python when the badger spooked for something and dived down a hole close by. The python then, Lazarus-like, dragged its body down the hole as well! What ghoulish events were happening underground we could only guess!


Kifaru
 
•A Honey Badger was seen killing a large python (estimated at three or more metres long) this month. This happened after sunset and the snake was deep inside a hole when the honey badger was found trying to pull it out. Once the python was out of the hole, the badger began to attack it from behind. First the snake lunged at the attacker three or four times trying to defend itself but each time the honey badger moved away and continued his attack from the rear. After about half an hour, the snake gave up the offensive and tried, in vain, to climb a small tree in an effort to escape. But the badger, seeing what was happening, dragged the python by the tail into a small clearing where it killed it and started to feed. This scene, however, was disturbed when a hyaena appeared. The badger initially chased it off, but later, both animals were seen rolling on the dead snake before the hyaena left the area The following morning, drag-marks indicated that the Honey Badger had taken its prize into a hole nearby.


Against Reptiles the Honey Badger is amazing!

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