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Who wins?
Cheetah 38 (82.6%)
African Wild Dog 8 (17.4%)
Total Votes: 46
Cheetah v African Wild Dog
Topic Started: May 14 2012, 07:06 PM (5,473 Views)
Taipan
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Cheetah - Acinonyx jubatus
The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is a large-sized feline (family Felidae) inhabiting most of Africa and parts of the Middle East. The cheetah is the only extant member of the genus Acinonyx, most notable for modifications in the species' paws. As such, it is the only felid with non-retractable claws and pads that, by their scope, disallow gripping (therefore cheetahs cannot climb vertical trees, although they are generally capable of reaching easily accessible branches). The cheetah, however, achieves by far the fastest land speed of any living animal—between 112 and 120 km/h (70 and 75 mph) in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m (1,600 ft), and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to over 100 km/h (62 mph) in three seconds. The cheetah's chest is deep and its waist is narrow. The coarse, short fur of the cheetah is tan with round black spots measuring from 2 to 3 cm (0.79 to 1.2 in) across, affording it some camouflage while hunting. There are no spots on its white underside, but the tail has spots, which merge to form four to six dark rings at the end. The tail usually ends in a bushy white tuft. The cheetah has a small head with high-set eyes. Black "tear marks" running from the corner of its eyes down the sides of the nose to its mouth keep sunlight out of its eyes and aid in hunting and seeing long distances. Although it can reach high speeds, its body cannot stand long distance running, because it is more suited to short bursts of speed. The adult cheetah weighs from 35 to 72 kg (77 to 160 lb). Its total head-and-body length is from 110 to 150 cm (43 to 59 in), while the tail can measure 60 to 84 cm (24 to 33 in) in length. Cheetahs are 66 to 94 cm (26 to 37 in) tall at the shoulder. Males tend to be slightly larger than females and have slightly bigger heads, but there is not a great variation in cheetah sizes and it is difficult to tell males and females apart by appearance alone. Compared to a similarly sized leopard, the cheetah is generally shorter-bodied, but is longer tailed and taller (it averages about 90 cm (35 in) tall) and so it appears more streamlined.

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African Wild Dog - Lycaon pictus
Lycaon pictus is a large canid found only in Africa, especially in savannas and lightly wooded areas. It is variously called the African wild dog, African hunting dog, Cape hunting dog, painted dog, painted wolf, painted hunting dog, spotted dog, or ornate wolf. he scientific name "Lycaon pictus" is derived from the Greek for "wolf" and the Latin for "painted". It is the only canid species to lack dewclaws on the forelimbs. This is the largest African canid and, behind only the gray wolf, is the world's second largest extant wild canid. Adults typically weigh 18–36 kilograms (40–79 lb). A tall, lean animal, it stands about 75 cm (30 in) at the shoulder, with a head and body length of 75–141 cm (30–56 in) plus a tail of 30 to 45 cm (12 to 18 in). Animals in southern Africa are generally larger than those in eastern or western Africa. There is little sexual dimorphism, though judging by skeletal dimensions, males are usually 3-7% larger. The African wild dog's main prey varies among populations but always centers around medium-to-large sized ungulates, such as the impala, Thomson's Gazelle, Springbok, kudu, reedbuck, and wildebeest calves. The most frequent single prey species depends upon season and local availability. For example, in the Serengeti in the 1970s wildebeest (mostly calves) were the most frequently taken species (57%) from January to June, but Thompsons gazelle were the most frequently taken (79%) during the rest of the year.

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ImperialDino
 
African Wild Dog vs Cheetah
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Bull and Terrier
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Cheetah. We have seen videoes on the old carnivora of cheetah chasing away lone wild dog. The cheetah is to large for AWD, and can easily subdue it and get a killing bite. But at parity, AWD.
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mohamad
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cheetah can easly wins its too larger faster and more powerful 9/10 for cheetah
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mohamad
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ManEater
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I think it's even a mismatch , the cheetah is twice bigger .
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Rodentsofunusualsize
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If this was parity the Cheetah would be outmatched, but the Cheetah is waaay bigger, and thus stronger and more durable. Almost a mismatch.
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Wild
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Bull and Terrier
May 14 2012, 07:20 PM
Cheetah. We have seen videoes on the old carnivora of cheetah chasing away lone wild dog. The cheetah is to large for AWD, and can easily subdue it and get a killing bite. But at parity, AWD.
Just because an animal is intimidated by another doesn't necessarily mean they are capable of winning a confrontation with it. A rottweiler will run if a kitten chases it but what would happen if the two got in a fight? I have to say at max or average weights the cheetah wins purely because of size. At parity the AWD takes it comfortably.
Edited by Wild, May 15 2012, 09:20 AM.
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Dexterous
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Cheetahs are stronger, more agile and have more flexible limbs than African wild dogs and could take them even at parity
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Wild
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Dexterous
May 15 2012, 05:51 AM
Cheetahs are stronger, more agile and have more flexible limbs than African wild dogs and could take them even at parity
I doubt it. Sure they have more flexible limbs but they probably don't have a much more muscle mass than an African wild dog at parity. Also AWD's seem to be just as agile at the bottom there is a picture of one grabbing an impala in its jaws while jumping in mid-air. The cheetah would have trouble subduing the dog since they are equal in size and the African wild dog has a much more deadly bite. If it is got is jaws on the cheetahs neck that could mean a sure win. African wild dogs have the highest bite force quotient of any living mammal and a cheetah has a relatively thin and weak neck. The cheetah might put up a struggle but its rather dull claws are almost useless. Again I support my statement that at parity the african wild dog takes this.

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Edited by Wild, May 15 2012, 06:35 AM.
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Taipan
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animal118
May 15 2012, 06:34 AM
Again I support my statement that at parity the african wild dog takes this.

At parity the Cheetah would be a subadult or runt, whilst the African Wild Dog an exceptional large specimen, so a parity comparison is unrepresentative and irrelevant.
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Wild
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Taipan
May 15 2012, 03:23 PM
animal118
May 15 2012, 06:34 AM
Again I support my statement that at parity the african wild dog takes this.

At parity the Cheetah would be a subadult or runt, whilst the African Wild Dog an exceptional large specimen, so a parity comparison is unrepresentative and irrelevant.
I guess you're right. I never really liked to take parity or max sizes anyway average is always the most realistic
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Lycaon
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The cheetah wins due to it's size advantage if it chooses to fight.
But if the dog gets the cheetah to run, the cat can very well die from exhaustion; another scenario is that in such a weakened state, it can actually be killed by the dog.

After all, saluki have been used to run down cheetah to the point of exhaustion.
Edited by Lycaon, May 16 2012, 12:09 AM.
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Wild
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Lycaon
May 16 2012, 12:06 AM
The cheetah wins due to it's size advantage if it chooses to fight.
But if the dog gets the cheetah to run, the cat can very well die from exhaustion; another scenario is that in such a weakened state, it can actually be killed by the dog.

After all, saluki have been used to run down cheetah to the point of exhaustion.
true but I doubt the cheetah will run from sits smaller opponent. This is kinda a mismatch the cheetah is too big they should have picked a smaller cat.
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Gato Gordo
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A cheetah would prevail more often than not. It is simply too large and too fast for an AWD. However, IMO the AWD would be quite risky for the cheetah.

I think that the following info that I posted in the cheetah vs chimp thread may be relevant to assess this match.

Below is a post that I posted long time ago in the old forum on how cheetahs fight.

I sought this info to counter the claims by an dumb stubborn and rude poster (happily gone away for good) who insisted over and over that cheetahs can be annihilated even by much smaller (and "scrappy") contenders like a male baboon, an AWD or some small feisty dogs. Such claims are IMO based on shaky grounds because they rely on the popular image of cheetahs as "non-fighters", weakos, animal nerds, etc, because they are seen on TV documentaries (who almost always show cheetah females) being chased away. But "chasing away" is not the same as wounding/killing or loosing real fights.

Some clues of how cheetahs fight.

The cheetah always surrenders kills and is often chased away by other predators and male baboons or AWD's packs. Therefore, since they don't usually present resistance or even skirmish, there are very few indications of how they would actually fight in case they had to fight (say, they couldn't or wouldn't escape).

In order to have more information on this issue (food for thought), I am posting some passages that I found in the book "Cheetah" by Luke Hunter and Dave Hamman. These passages provide some clues of how cheetahs would fight:

PASSAGE #1: A cheetah confronts a hyena:

Page 122

Field Notes: December 11

06:30: The Northern March cheetah coalition is feeding on an adult nyala bull when a large female hyena lopes in. One male remains on the kill, apparently unconcerned, while the larger male gets up to confront the hyena. She lunges at the cheetah but he lands a heavy blow on her face and neck with both forepaws. She is cut quite badly on the snout (almost certainly from the cheetah's dewclaw) but it does not deter here. She turns on her attacker and tries to bite the cheetah, but he dodges her. She is not interested in pursuing him and moves to the carcass. The second male moves off the kill, growling once, but with no great urgency. Both cheetahs watch the hyena briefly from a distance of 20 metres and then walk away. They have very full belies and the kill is almost finished. Presumably, they have little to gain from a more violent crash.

MY COMMENTS:




  • A large female hyena is way over any cheetah, and she is likely larger (60-80 kg vs 40-60 kg). I don't claim that this field observation proves that a cheetah would prevail on this match.

  • However, this observation clearly shows a technique that a cheetah would use in a fight. While this technique didn't cause too much damage to a large female hyena, it can can be effective against a much smaller contender, like a baboon or an AWD.

  • I can figure a male baboon lunging at the cheetah and the cheetah landing a a heavy blow on his face and neck with both forepaws. The baboon (much smaller animal) would be cut quite badly on the snout (almost certainly from the cheetah's dewclaw). The baboon would likely turn on the cheetah and would try to bite or grab it, but the cheetah is also likely to dodge the baboon.

  • I can figure the same technique applied to the AWD or to the HB.

  • IMO, what this description proves is not that the cheetah would easily prevail over a male baboon or AWD, but that it is far from being a "sitting duck" that these animals can easily annihilate.



PASSAGE #2: two cheeta males kill another male

Page 53:

Field Notes: May 27

07:05: The territorial pair, Carl and Linford, are hunting about 150 metres in the distance. A moment after I first sight them, they take off after something, but the grass is very long and I am too far away to see what they are chasing. I loose them and relocate them at 07:15. I am stunned to discover that they are in the process of killing another male cheetah. Carl is throttling the male in the manner of killing prey, only much more aggressively, and Linford is mauling the flank. They are both extremely agitated \. The third cheetah is already close to death and beyond resisting, but there must have been a brief skirmish as both attacking cheetahs have deep bite wounds on their cheeks and ears. They maintain their holds for 15 minutes, by which time the third male is dead. Carl and Linford rest briefly then fall upon the dead cheetah again, attacking the carcass as though to make sure it is dead. Time after time, they continue to maul the dead cheetah, interspersed with brief rests until 08:00.

MY COMMENTS:



  • This complete description corrects a partial version of this event used once by a poster to justify his claim that cheetahs don't fight back. The partial description ends with phrase "The third cheetah is already close to death and beyond resisting". However, this third cheetah fought back, and managed to harm the two attackers, causing them deep bite wounds. So, cheetahs do fight back.

  • This text shows that one of the two cheetahs (Carl) killed the third cheetah by throttling. However, it is not correct to say that cheetahs kill contenders EXACTLY as they kill prey: while the method is the same, the intensity was much higher and the kill was more efficient. While a cheetah will take up to 20 minutes to strangle a 25 kg Thomson gazelle, it took Carl less than 10 minutes to subdue and kill an adult male cheetah (at least 40 kg).

  • Therefore, the idea that a cheetah will need 20 minutes to kill by a strangulation bite an AWD or a baboon has no empiric basis. Likely, if a large male cheetah gets a bite hold on these 20-25 kg animals, he could strangle kill them in a few minutes.



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Lycaon
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^great post gato!
I too agree that cheetah would win in the fight as I stated earlier. With a good size and strength advantage the smaller wild dog can at best put up a strong retaliation as opposed to killing the cheetah. Some exceptions can occur where the dogs wins, for example if we use smaller cheetah subspecies or animals closer in size imo.

A cheetah that is not careful could readily receive crippling/serious injuries. Bites from an awd would be devastating due to the shearing teeth and high biteforce. Factors which are likely due to the need for handling loads of stress during hunts.
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