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Who wins?
Leopard 48 (60.8%)
Dire Wolf 31 (39.2%)
Total Votes: 79
Leopard v Dire Wolf
Topic Started: Jun 19 2012, 03:56 PM (25,941 Views)
Taipan
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Leopard - Panthera pardus
The leopard, Panthera pardus, is a member of the Felidae family and the smallest of the four "big cats" in the genus Panthera, the other three being the tiger, lion, and jaguar. The leopard was once distributed across eastern and southern Asia and Africa, from Siberia to South Africa, but its range of distribution has decreased radically because of hunting and loss of habitat. It is now chiefly found in sub-Saharan Africa; there are also fragmented populations in Indonesia, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Indochina, Malaysia, and China. Because of its declining range and population, it is listed as a "Near Threatened" species by the IUCN. Leopard are agile and stealthy predators. Although smaller than other members of the Panthera genus, they are able to take large prey due to their massive skulls that facilitate powerful jaw muscles. Head and body length is between 125 and 165 cm (49 and 65 in), and the tail reaches 60 to 110 cm (24 to 43 in). Shoulder height is 45 to 80 cm (18 to 31 in). The muscles attached to the scapula are exceptionally strong, which enhance their ability to climb trees. They show a great diversity in size. Males are about 30% larger than females, weighing 30 to 91 kg (66 to 200 lb) compared to 23 to 60 kg (51 to 130 lb) for females. Large males of up to 91 lb (41 kg) have been documented in Kruger National Park in South Africa; however, males in the South Africa's coastal mountains average 31 lb (14 kg). This wide variation in size is thought to result from the quality and availability of prey found in each habitat. Smaller sized leopards also are known in the deserts of the Middle East. Its body is comparatively long, and its legs are short.

Posted Image

Dire Wolf - Canis dirus
The Dire wolf (Canis dirus) is an extinct carnivorous mammal of the genus Canis, and was most common in North America and South America from the Irvingtonian stage to the Rancholabrean stage of the Pleistocene epoch living 1.80 Ma – 10,000 years ago, existing for approximately 1.79 million years. lthough it was closely related to the Gray Wolf and other sister species, Canis dirus was not the direct ancestor of any species known today. Unlike the Gray Wolf, which is of Eurasian origin, the Dire Wolf evolved on the North American continent, along with the Coyote. The Dire Wolf co-existed with the Gray Wolf in North America for about 100,000 years. he Dire Wolf was larger than the Gray Wolf, averaging about 1.5 metres (5 ft) in length and weighing between 50 kg (110 lb) and 79 kg (174 lb). Despite superficial similarities to the Gray Wolf, there were significant differences between the two species. The legs of the Dire Wolf were proportionally shorter and sturdier than those of the Gray Wolf, and its brain case was smaller than that of a similarly sized gray wolf. The Dire Wolf's teeth were similar to the Gray Wolf's, only slightly larger, pointing to a hypercarnivorous to mesocarnivorous activity. Paleontologist R.M. Nowak states the dietary characteristics are primarily carnivorous as well as partially omnivorous.

Posted Image

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Mohamad
 
dire wolf vs leopard
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k9boy
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At parity between healthy males the leopard takes It 8/10
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mohamad
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60 kg dire wolf vs 50 kg leopard = dire wolf 6/10
same weigh = leopard 6/10
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Elephantus
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At parity, I think either 50/50 or a slight edge to the leopard.

The dire wolf was stockier and more powerful then any gray wolf, not to mention it had an extremely powerful bite, but the leopard is more agile and could still control the wolf with its grappling abilities.

At average weights, most leopards tend to grow bigger and would thus win more convincingly. The smaller Cape and Arabian subspecies though, would most likely lose.
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kuri
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not bigger than a leopard, and the rule "a canidae needs a big weight advantage to beat a cat" means..leopard wins.
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DinosaurMichael
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Leopard due to grappling ability and not to mention it is more faster and agile.
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Canidae
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kuri
Jun 20 2012, 01:31 AM
not bigger than a leopard, and the rule "a canidae needs a big weight advantage to beat a cat" means..leopard wins.
That non-existent rule. rolleyes

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Homotherium
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Leopard can kill any canid, except a much larger Epicyon.
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Elephantus
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kuri
Jun 20 2012, 01:31 AM
not bigger than a leopard, and the rule "a canidae needs a big weight advantage to beat a cat" means..leopard wins.
What rule?
Edited by Elephantus, Jun 20 2012, 02:37 AM.
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kuri
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Elephantus
Jun 20 2012, 02:36 AM
kuri
Jun 20 2012, 01:31 AM
not bigger than a leopard, and the rule "a canidae needs a big weight advantage to beat a cat" means..leopard wins.
What rule?
a canidae has no advantage over a felidae.
Felidae:
-more muscle power
-claws
-agility
-evolved for solitary life

How would a canidae compensate such abilities?
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Elephantus
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Quote:
 
-more muscle power


Yeah, big cats tend to have more muscle mass then canines, but is it certain that they are considerably stronger? Also, remember that Dire wolves are quite robust for canines.

I know Ursus posted alot of details on the "muscle info" thread, some of which may contradict previous assumptions on strength. I dont really get all the info, but hopefully he will see this thread and post more data here.

Quote:
 
-claws


Claws can help, but they wont cause any critical damage. They really arent meant for that.

Quote:
 
-agility


Likely true and one of the reasons I give the edge to the leopard. But canines can still be kind of agile themselves, despite their inflexible limbs.

Quote:
 
-evolved for solitary life


That wont really help, IMO. If anything, I can argue that due to evolving to hunt solitary with ambush and stealth, the leopard would not be as good of a fighter....
Edited by Elephantus, Jun 20 2012, 03:03 AM.
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Wild
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Canidae
Jun 20 2012, 02:08 AM
kuri
Jun 20 2012, 01:31 AM
not bigger than a leopard, and the rule "a canidae needs a big weight advantage to beat a cat" means..leopard wins.
That non-existent rule. rolleyes

Is there some evidence against that rule? I'm a little doubtful of it too (though not completely)
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Wild
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Elephantus
Jun 20 2012, 03:01 AM
Quote:
 
-more muscle power


Yeah, big cats tend to have more muscle mass then canines, but is it certain that they are considerably stronger? Also, remember that Dire wolves are quite robust for canines.

I know Ursus posted alot of details on the "muscle info" thread, some of which may contradict previous assumptions on strength. I dont really get all the info, but hopefully he will see this thread and post more data here.

Quote:
 
-claws


Claws can help, but they wont cause any critical damage. They really arent meant for that.

Quote:
 
-agility


Likely true and one of the reasons I give the edge to the leopard. But canines can still be kind of agile themselves, despite their inflexible limbs.

Quote:
 
-evolved for solitary life


That wont really help, IMO. If anything, I can argue that due to evolving to hunt solitary with ambush and stealth, the leopard would not be as good of a fighter....
You can't totally rule out claws. they are very useful form gripping and helping control the movements of other animals. Also they can help deter some attacks. A single paw strike from a leopard can tear open a lion's jaw and prevent it from delivering bites.
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Elephantus
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Wild Dog
Jun 20 2012, 03:14 AM
Elephantus
Jun 20 2012, 03:01 AM
Quote:
 
-more muscle power


Yeah, big cats tend to have more muscle mass then canines, but is it certain that they are considerably stronger? Also, remember that Dire wolves are quite robust for canines.

I know Ursus posted alot of details on the "muscle info" thread, some of which may contradict previous assumptions on strength. I dont really get all the info, but hopefully he will see this thread and post more data here.

Quote:
 
-claws


Claws can help, but they wont cause any critical damage. They really arent meant for that.

Quote:
 
-agility


Likely true and one of the reasons I give the edge to the leopard. But canines can still be kind of agile themselves, despite their inflexible limbs.

Quote:
 
-evolved for solitary life


That wont really help, IMO. If anything, I can argue that due to evolving to hunt solitary with ambush and stealth, the leopard would not be as good of a fighter....
You can't totally rule out claws. they are very useful form gripping and helping control the movements of other animals. Also they can help deter some attacks. A single paw strike from a leopard can tear open a lion's jaw and prevent it from delivering bites.
I never completely ruled out claws, but I dont think they would be that big of an advantage. Claws rarely cause critical damage and are more used for getting a solid hold on a victim.

I would like to point out, that as for the wolves advantages in this fight, it would probably have more endurance and may very well have a stronger bite.

I would also like to state that I generally do support the leopard, unless it is at a size disadvantage, but I think it is far, far from a mismatch.
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kuri
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@Elephantus
this attributes are enough to bring a felidae on top.
Watch a fighting cat, it's a complete differente style. More powerfull and furious than a fight of a canidae.
A cat bites, claws, jumps, and wrestle.

A good analogy is a boxer vs a mma fighter.

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