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Jaguarundi v Fossa
Topic Started: Jun 27 2012, 06:29 PM (2,755 Views)
Taipan
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Jaguarundi - Puma yagouaroundi
The jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi) is a small-sized wild cat native to Central and South America. Jaguarundis are primarily diurnal, being active during the day rather than evenings or night time. They are comfortable in trees, but prefer to hunt on the ground. They will eat almost any small animal that they can catch, typically catching a mixture of rodents, small reptiles, and ground-feeding birds. They have also been observed to kill larger prey, such as rabbits, and opossums; relatively unusual prey include fish and even marmosets. Like many other cats they also include a small amount of vegetation and arthropods in their diet. In terms of physical appearance, the jaguarundi is perhaps the least cat-like of all the cats. It has a total length of 53 to 77 cm (21 to 30 in), not including the 31 to 60 cm (12 to 24 in) tail, and weighs 3.5 to 9.1 kg (7.7 to 20 lb).

Posted Image

Fossa - Cryptoprocta ferox
The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. It is a member of the Eupleridae, a family of carnivorans closely related to the mongoose family (Herpestidae). Its classification has been controversial because its physical traits resemble those of cats, yet other traits suggest a close relationship with viverrids (most civets and their relatives). Its classification, along with that of the other Malagasy carnivores, influenced hypotheses about how many times mammalian carnivores have colonized the island. With genetic studies demonstrating that the fossa and all other Malagasy carnivores are most closely related to each other (forming a clade, recognized as the family Eupleridae), carnivorans are now thought to have colonized the island once around 18 to 20 million years ago. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island of Madagascar and has been compared to a small cougar. Adults have a head-body length of 70–80 cm (28–31 in) and weigh between 5.5–8.6 kg (12–19 lb), with the males larger than the females. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree.

Posted Image

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Fossa vs Jaguarundi
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Black Ice
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It Bites Worse Than It Barks
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FelisRex
Sep 19 2012, 01:05 AM
How does it prove nothing? Taking larger prey takes more physical strength, physical strength is important in interspecific conflict... On a psychological level too an animal that takes prey of similar to larger size will be less apprehensive to fight when faced with an animal of equal to larger size. Is this stemming from your bushdog maned wolf analogy? Nature is full of exceptions, foils and contradictions with no hard fast rules, but in general an animal that takes substantially larger prey needs more strength.
It proves nothing because
Single wolves have killed bison, something a cougar has never done
Yet we all know which would win in a straight up brawl.
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Mauro20
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FelisRex
Sep 19 2012, 01:05 AM
in general an animal that takes substantially larger prey needs more strength.
Let's talk about modern Madagascar. As I said, there are not many large prey in Madagascar. The fossa can't hunt animals that don't inhabit the same place, obviously.
Edited by Mauro20, Sep 19 2012, 02:07 AM.
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Apex
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from wiki
The fossa has been reported to prey on domestic animals, such as goats and small calves,

This behavior may be a vestige of cooperative hunting that would have been required to take down larger recently extinct lemurs.

and current dietary
preying upon adults of all extant lemur species,[24][27] the largest of which can weigh as much as 90% of the weight of the average fossa
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FelisRex
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_fossa

Quote:
 
C. spelea would have been able to prey on larger animals than its smaller relative could have, including the recently extinct giant lemurs.

Specifically says giant fossas preyed on giant lemurs that the fossas couldn't.
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Apex
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the other wiki page said they could and wiki is usually more reliable for extant animals rather than extinct ones
Edited by Apex, Sep 19 2012, 03:06 AM.
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FelisRex
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apexpredator7
Sep 19 2012, 03:06 AM
the other wiki page said they could and wiki is usually more reliable for extant animals rather than extinct ones
less reliable about extinct animals? such as the giant lemurs that fossa "may have" preyed on.
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Apex
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yeah but it assumes the giant fossa preyed on larger prey than the normal fossa because the giant fossa is obviously less studied than its extant relative so the assumptions about it are more vague
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FelisRex
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but the assumptions about the giant lemur would be just as vague, would it not?
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Apex
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no because studying the skills of fossa hunting today scientist will have a more accurate assumption of the fossa hunting capabilities and the size of prey they could take
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FelisRex
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From what I have read during the course of our discussion it is only assumed, in light of co-op hunting techniques that fossa may have preyed upon giant lemurs, however their is little doubt that giant fossa did, are we not suppose to question the competition the fossa would be under competing with its larger relative in such a tight ecological niche? What of the fact that the giant fossa died out in the same period as the giant lemur but the fossa did not. I wont be so bold as to say that fossa, through co-op hunting didn't prey upon larger species of lemur, I doubt it preyed upon them as regularly as giant fossa's and I doubt it fed on the gorilla sized archeoindri at all.
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Apex
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i agreee mostly but i think they may have occasionaly preyed on them but when they died out they were less dependent on the giant lemurs than their larger relatives so could survive
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tyrannotitan
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Fossa is gonna win.
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Mauro20
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Jaguarundi skull (I can't find better pictures):
Posted Image

Fossa skull:
Posted Image
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FelisRex
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here is a fossa skull from that same source.
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Mauro20
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Oh, thanks, but I wanted better pictures of a jaguarundi skull. Anyway, the fossa still looks more impressive.
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