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Who wins?
Rhomaleosaurus 8 (44.4%)
Ginsu Shark 10 (55.6%)
Total Votes: 18
Rhomaleosaurus spp. v Cretoxyrhina mantelli
Topic Started: Aug 31 2012, 09:16 PM (3,127 Views)
Taipan
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Rhomaleosaurus spp.
Rhomaleosaurus (meaning "strong lizard") is an extinct genus of Early Jurassic (Toarcian age, about 183 to 175.6 million years ago) rhomaleosaurid pliosauroid known from Northamptonshire and from Yorkshire of the United Kingdom. It was first named by Harry Seeley in 1874 and the type species is Rhomaleosaurus cramptoni. It was one of the earliest and large marine reptile predators which hunted in the seas of Mesozoic era. Its length was about 7 m (20 ft) long. Like other pliosaurs, Rhomaleosaurus fed on ichthyosaurs, ammonites and other plesiosaurs.

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Cretoxyrhina mantelli
Cretoxyrhina mantelli, the "Jaws of the Cretaceous", was a shark that lived in the Cretaceous period in the in the Western Interior Sea, about 100 million years ago. C. mantelli grew up to 24 feet (7 meters) long, and is known from several nearly complete skeletal fossils. Its name means "Mantell's chalk-sharp-nose".According to Shimada, associated fossil remains with evidence of digestive damage suggest that probable fish prey of C. mantelli included the massively jawed, 14-foot (4.25-metre) long Xiphactinus, which resembled a dagger-toothed tarpon and was a powerful predator in its own right. Based on a few tooth-scarred, associated mosasaur vertebrae, Shimada suggests that C. mantelli also tackled these 10- to 40-foot (3- to 12- metre) long marine reptiles of the late Cretaceous. While it is tempting to imagine titanic undersea battles between a giant shark and a sea dragon, it seems far more likely that Cretoxyrhina more commonly fed on large pelagic bony fishes, taking juvenile mosasaurs when the opportunity arose, and perhaps even dining on the occasional long-necked plesiosaur. Shimada concluded that Cretoxyrhina mantelli occupied a top predatory niche comparable to that of the modern White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias). Despite its fearsome size and armament, C. mantelli did not long survive, becoming extinct by about 90 million years ago.

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Dark allosaurus
Aug 31 2012, 06:39 AM
Cretoxyrhina vs Rhomaleosaurus
Edited by Taipan, Dec 12 2015, 10:50 PM.
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theropod
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palaeontology, open source and survival enthusiast
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They both could have grown somewhat larger than 7m. i remember forrest publishing on an 8m rhomaleosaur supposedly Rhomaleosaurus itself, and I even heard of 9m somewhere. Siverson spoke of Cretoxirhina possibly reaching 9 as well.
this is basically a fight between a bulky crocodile with a larger head and longer neck that is adapted for swift locomotion in water and great maneuverability and an oversized gws at lenght parity. I´ll wait for more comments until I give an edge to one of them
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SpinoInWonderland
The madness has come back...
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R h o m a l e o s a u r u s
W i n s
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Jinfengopteryx
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Aspiring paleontologist, science enthusiast and armchair speculative fiction/evolution writer
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I think if the 9m figure is accurate, the shark will win, otherwise, I'd say it's 50/50.
theropod
 
an oversized gws at lenght parity

It might be a lamnid, but I don't think you can say that already, it has clear differences:
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theropod
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Well, the differences are mere speculation based on the drawing, aren´t they?
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Mauro20
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Badass
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Not sure, but I think the shark wins.
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Carcharadon
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Shark Toothed Reptile
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50/50 for now
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yigit05
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Kleptoparasite
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ginsu shark wins size avantage,weight
Rhomaleosaurus stronger bite
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Jinfengopteryx
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Size advantage and weight are the same.
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Grey
Kleptoparasite
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I'm not certain that Rhomaleosaurus had a bite force comparable to a bigger-headed, similar-sized pliosaur like a Liopleurodon species.

It would be a great fight, but I give this to the Ginsu sharks, from which the level of sheer agression and power is known and could maybe reach longer size, which a presumably higher body mass.
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Fishfreak
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Friend of the fish
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Ginsu shark takes this imo, it's bulkier and has superior jaws.
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Vivyx
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Not sure, but I think the shark takes this. Faster, more agile, more superior jaws and is probably more bulkier.
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BITEFORCE MASTER
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Autotrophic Organism
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Normally the Ginsu swims with a pack so the pliosaur had the advantage here :D :D :unsure:
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NeoNotoungulata
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Heterotrophic Organism
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Rhomaleosaurus the pliosauroid known from Northamptonshire, should be able to take this , more superior jaws
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