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Tyrannosaurus rex v Dacentrurus
Topic Started: Sep 9 2012, 09:48 PM (12,862 Views)
DinosaurMichael
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Tyrannosaurus rex
Tyrannosaurus is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning "king" in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is a fixture in popular culture. It lived throughout what is now western North America, with a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 67 to 65.5 million years ago. It was among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to the large and powerful hindlimbs, Tyrannosaurus forelimbs were small, though unusually powerful for their size, and bore two clawed digits. Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded Tyrannosaurus rex in size, it was the largest known tyrannosaurid and one of the largest known land predators. By far the largest carnivore in its environment, Tyrannosaurus rex may have been an apex predator, preying upon hadrosaurs and ceratopsians, although some experts have suggested it was primarily a scavenger. The debate over Tyrannosaurus as apex predator or scavenger is among the longest running in paleontology. Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest land carnivores of all time; the largest complete specimen, FMNH PR2081 ("Sue"), measured 12.8 metres (42 ft) long, and was 4.0 metres (13.1 ft) tall at the hips. Mass estimates have varied widely over the years, from more than 7.2 metric tons (7.9 short tons), to less than 4.5 metric tons (5.0 short tons), with most modern estimates ranging between 5.4 and 6.8 metric tons (6.0 and 7.5 short tons). Packard et al. (2009) tested dinosaur mass estimation procedures on elephants and concluded that dinosaur estimations are flawed and produce over-estimations; thus, the weight of Tyrannosaurus could be much less than usually estimated. Other estimations have concluded that the largest known Tyrannosaurus specimens had a weight exceeding 9 tonnes.

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Dacentrurus armatus
Dacentrurus ("very sharp tail"), originally known as Omosaurus, was a large stegosaur of the Late Jurassic Period (154 - 150 mya). This dinosaur measured around 8 metres (26 ft) in length. It had paired triangular plates down its spine, with four pairs of spikes on the end of the tail. This configuration closely resembles that of its relative, Kentrosaurus (see also: thagomizer). Many books claim that Dacentrurus was a small stegosaur, when in fact finds such as a 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) pelvis (measured at the acetabula) suggest that Dacentrurus was among the largest of them. Although Dacentrurus is considered to have the same proportions as a Stegosaurus, Dacentrurus' plate and spike configuration is known to be rather different, as Dacentrurus has both two rows of small plates and two rows of longer spines along its back. Its closest relative within Stegosauria is Miragaia, and the two are united in the subfamily Dacentrurinae.

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brolyeuphyfusion
Sep 8 2012, 01:58 PM
Dacentrurus vs Tyrannosaurus
Edited by Taipan, Oct 10 2012, 02:40 PM.
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SpinoInWonderland
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Dacentrurus is bulkier, and has large spikes on it's body, both are about the same size(6 tonnes) Dacentrurus is more formidable
85/15 in favor of Dacentrurus
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Verdugo
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Tough one, can anyone make the size comparison ?
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Jinfengopteryx
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@brolyeuphyfusion
85/15 is too much imo, but I still favour Dacentrurus, T rex will have a very hard time to avoid the spikes.
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Megafelis Fatalis
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Tyrannosaurus = 12m (using hartman's scale bar) // Dacentrurus = 8m
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Carcharadon
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T.rex wins imo. It just needs to bite the stegosaur on the head and kill it.
Edited by Carcharadon, Aug 14 2013, 05:46 AM.
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SpinoInWonderland
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Prehistoric Cat
Sep 9 2012, 11:30 PM
Tyrannosaurus = 12m (using hartman's scale bar) // Dacentrurus = 8m
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Dacentrurus is 10 meters, not 8
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Carcharadon
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brolyeuphyfusion
Sep 9 2012, 11:35 PM
Prehistoric Cat
Sep 9 2012, 11:30 PM
Tyrannosaurus = 12m (using hartman's scale bar) // Dacentrurus = 8m
Posted Image
Dacentrurus is 10 meters, not 8
Actually, according to the OP, it is 8 m
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SpinoInWonderland
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Dark allosaurus
Sep 9 2012, 11:36 PM
brolyeuphyfusion
Sep 9 2012, 11:35 PM
Prehistoric Cat
Sep 9 2012, 11:30 PM
Tyrannosaurus = 12m (using hartman's scale bar) // Dacentrurus = 8m
Posted Image
Dacentrurus is 10 meters, not 8
Actually, according to the OP, it is 8 m
The OP isn't the only source of information around, it just takes from the animal profiles or wikipedia

10 meters:
http://www.caitlinsyme.com/1/post/2012/5/obscure-dinosaur-of-the-week-dacentrurus-armatus.html

http://www.thescelosaurus.com/stegosauria.htm[/url]
stegosauria
 
Dacentrurus, based on the first described stegosaurid (that original name, Omosaurus, was preoccupied), is one of the more basal stegosaurids. Some researchers suggest it deserves to be put in a separate family. It is also one of the largest, with some remains suggesting individuals of 10 meters in length, although many nontechnical works have described it as small. As with many stegosaurids, the armor includes paired plates in the neck region grading to spines. It has an unusually great temporal span, covering essentially the entire Late Jurassic, suggesting that there may be more than one species represented in the known remains. Much of the younger material is from Portugal, including five partial skeletons. Despite the large number of remains, it is an obscure animal. Like other basal stegosaurids, the forelimbs are still long relative to the hindlimb.
Edited by SpinoInWonderland, Sep 9 2012, 11:41 PM.
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Megafelis Fatalis
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Really ? 10m long and 4.5m wide ?
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SpinoInWonderland
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http://dml.cmnh.org/2000Aug/msg00427.html

Ooops: any individual of _Dacentrurus_ that was about 12 ft long
would have been a juvenile... _Dacentrurus_ is a BIG animal, there
being femora more than 1 m long and a complete pelvis from the
Kimmeridge Clay that is something absurd like 1.5 m across at the
acetabula. Some of this material scales up to suggest individuals of 10
m total length
- you'd have to check all the literature for the facts (lots
of obscure little Galton papers) but it looks like _Dacentrurus_ was a
giant, and perhaps the biggest stegosaur. Incidentally, here I'm talking
about _D. armatus_.

Why virtually all dinosaur books refer to _Dacentrurus_ as small, and
give it lengths of 4-5 m, is beyond me: Peter Dodson draws attention
to this phenomenon in his book. Basically, it's because many dinosaur
books are not written by people familiar with either the specimens or
the technical literature AND because books tend to copy 'facts'
promulgated by earlier ones.
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SpinoInWonderland
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Prehistoric Cat
Sep 9 2012, 11:45 PM
Really ? 10m long and 4.5m wide ?
I don't know about the width, but 10 meters length, yes definitely
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Megafelis Fatalis
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brolyeuphyfusion
Sep 9 2012, 11:49 PM
Prehistoric Cat
Sep 9 2012, 11:45 PM
Really ? 10m long and 4.5m wide ?
I don't know about the width, but 10 meters length, yes definitely
The first link you posted says that .........
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SpinoInWonderland
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Prehistoric Cat
Sep 9 2012, 11:52 PM
brolyeuphyfusion
Sep 9 2012, 11:49 PM
Prehistoric Cat
Sep 9 2012, 11:45 PM
Really ? 10m long and 4.5m wide ?
I don't know about the width, but 10 meters length, yes definitely
The first link you posted says that .........
That's only the first, and I am doubtful of that since 4.5 meters of width would be too much for a 10 meter long stegosaur, I only used that link for the length, but all the links say Dacentrurus is 10 meters long
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Megafelis Fatalis
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Dacentrurus 10m
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Edited by Megafelis Fatalis, Sep 10 2012, 12:00 AM.
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