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Who wins?
Coyote 13 (54.2%)
Staffordshire Bull Terrier 11 (45.8%)
Total Votes: 24
Coyote v Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Topic Started: Oct 30 2012, 04:26 PM (12,573 Views)
Taipan
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Coyote - Canis latrans
The coyote (Canis latrans), also known as the American jackal or the prairie wolf, is a species of canine found throughout North and Central America, ranging from Panama in the south, north through Mexico, the United States and Canada. It occurs as far north as Alaska and all but the northernmost portions of Canada. The color of the coyote's pelt varies from grayish-brown to yellowish-gray on the upper parts, while the throat and belly tend to have a buff or white color. The forelegs, sides of the head, muzzle and paws are reddish-brown. The back has tawny-colored underfur and long, black-tipped guard hairs that form a black dorsal stripe and a dark cross on the shoulder area. The black-tipped tail has a scent gland located on its dorsal base. Coyotes shed once a year, beginning in May with light hair loss, ending in July after heavy shedding. The ears are proportionately large in relation to the head, while the feet are relatively small in relation to the rest of the body. Certain experts have noted the shape of a domestic dog's brain case is closer to the coyote's in shape than that of a wolf's. Mountain-dwelling coyotes tend to be dark-furred, while desert coyotes tend to be more light brown in color. Coyotes typically grow to 30–34 in (76–86 cm) in length, not counting a tail of 12–16 in (30–41 cm), stand about 23–26 in (58–66 cm) at the shoulder and, on average, weigh from 15–46 lb (6.8–21 kg). Northern coyotes are typically larger than southern subspecies, with the largest coyotes on record weighing 74.75 pounds (33.91 kg) and measuring 1.75 m (5.7 ft) in total length.

Posted Image

Staffordshire Bull Terrier
The Staffordshire Bull Terrier (informally: Staffie, Stafford, Staffy or Staff) is a medium-sized, short-coated, old-time breed of dog. It is an English dog, where it is the 5th most popular breed, and related to the bull terrier. Having descended from dog-fighting ancestors, it is muscular and courageous. It is the subject of breed specific legislation in some jurisdictions. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a medium-sized, stocky, and very muscular dog with strong athletic ability, with a similar appearance to the American Staffordshire terrier and American pit bull terriers sharing the same ancestor. They have a broad head (male considerably more than female), defined occipital muscles, a relatively short foreface, dark round eyes and a wide mouth with a clean scissor-like bite (the top incisors slightly overlap the bottom incisors). The ears are small. The cheek muscles are very pronounced. Their lips show no looseness. From above, the head loosely resembles a triangle. The head tapers down to a strong well-muscled neck and shoulders placed on squarely spaced forelimbs. They are tucked up in their loins and the last 1-2 ribs of their ribcage are usually visible. Their tail resembles an old fashioned pump handle. Their hind quarters are well-muscled and are what give the Stafford drive when baiting. They are coloured brindle, black, red, fawn, blue, white, or any blending of these colors with white. White with any other colour broken up over the body is known as pied. Liver-colored, black and tan dogs can occur but are rare. The coat is smooth and clings tightly to the body giving the dog a streamlined appearance.The dogs stand 36 to 42 cm (14 to 17 in) at the withers and weigh 14 to 18 kg (31 to 40 lb) for males; bitches are 11 to 15.4 kg (24 to 34 lb).

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____________________________________________________________________________

Full Throttle
Oct 30 2012, 02:11 AM
Coyote vs Staffordshire bull terrier please Taipan
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k9boy
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Coyote gets destroyed.
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ImperialDino
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k9boy
Oct 30 2012, 06:36 PM
Coyote gets destroyed.
Do some research and learn more about coyotes. Staffordshire Bull Terriers are similar too Pitbulls but not Pitbulls. Staffordshire's are small with legs that are too short. This is an even fight and the Eastern Coyote beats the Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Eastern Coyote

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Edited by ImperialDino, Oct 31 2012, 07:50 PM.
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Bull and Terrier
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ImperialDino
Oct 30 2012, 06:52 PM
k9boy
Oct 30 2012, 06:36 PM
Coyote gets destroyed.
Do some research and learn more about coyotes. Staffordshire Bull Terriers are similar too Pitbulls but not Pitbulls. Staffordshire's are small with legs that are too short. This is an even fight and the Eastern Coyote beats the Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Eastern Coyote

Posted Image
Posted Image
I think you need to do some reasearch yourself imperaldino. It is only the show breed staffords that usually have very short legs, but even them are very athletic and has a great deal of power, and would probably beat the average coyote. It is like a small pet apbt.

Most working stock staffords are actually very similiar to working stock apbt, and they are probably the only dogs that has beaten good game breed apbts at parity, some have even go up in weight. Also, sbt, range from 11-30kg, I would definently back the largest sbt's vs the largest eastern coyotes. A average male sbt at 18-20kg would take on a similar sized coyote without to much problem. They have much thicker skinn, more durable build, stronger jaws, and are a exellent close quarter fighter with no fear for other animals.

Sbt skull vs coyote skull, you can see how much wider and more powerfully built the sbt skull is. Also it's molars are much more powerful, and the canines are almost equal in size. This suggests that a sbt would have a much higher bite force in my opinion.
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Taipan
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Bull and Terrier
Oct 30 2012, 08:42 PM
It is like a small pet apbt.


Then we should all favour the coyote?


Reddhole
Oct 6 2012, 01:31 AM
Fairburn residents suspect coyotes behind pet attacks

FAIRBURN, Ga. - Residents in Fairburn are worried about coyotes attacking their pets.

Lewis Dunn snapped a photograph of two coyotes near his backyard that have mauled one pit bull and killed another. One attack occurred on Mehaffee Drive, while the other was on Fayetteville Road.

Experts say it's extremely unusual for a coyote to attack something as potentially vicious as a pit bull. But there are a couple of other unusual things about the coyotes seen in the photo. First, there are two of them. Coyotes are not usually seen together, wildlife experts say. Second, the sun is shining. Coyotes are rarely seen in the daytime.

"Usually if you see animals out like that, they might have distemper or parvo or early stages of rabies," said Dunn.

Officials believe that coyotes are feeding on pets and wildlife on the edge of the population and living in a vast area of woodlands in south Fulton County.

Lee Johnson, the owner of Uniques Taxidermy in Fairburn, has a state wildlife license to care for a deer. The coyotes have been digging nightly at the bottom of its enclosure, and Johnson fears the worst.

"They dug in about six months ago and killed one of my turkeys and took the turkey back out, so yeah they can get in," said Johnson.

The coyotes are believes to have attacked Willie Thorton's dog ,Coco, and killed another pit bull named Polo.

Johnson studies animals for a living and has clients from around the world. The coyotes have him both baffled and afraid for his wildlife and his neighbor's pets.

"I've known several people to say that their cats have disappeared to them. I had a friend that had a poodle that was yanked off his back porch here awhile back too," said Johnson.


http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/story/19587331/coyotes-suspected-in-fairburn-pit-bull-attacks


Reddhole
Aug 31 2012, 03:14 AM
Eastern coyote kills 14 year old female pit bull mix. Obviously, this was an old dog and surely not a top specimen.

The attitude of residents is dissappointing. Overstating the risk to humans and demanding the coyote's removal when the people chose to live in and area "abutted by an expansive area of woods and wetlands."

It's city vs varmint



Danbury may be a bustling city of more than 80,000 residents, but in one small neighborhood on the west side it's a howling, prowling coyote that's keeping people up at night.

Officials in the seventh-largest city in the state are looking to hire a trapper to catch the animal, which is getting blamed for attacking and killing several cats and dogs this summer.

Tammany Lane resident Ana Maria Costa was on the verge of tears this week as she described how a coyote killed Diamond, her 14-year-old pit bull mix, in broad daylight last month.

Costa said she had just gotten home from work and let Diamond out of the house when, less than half an hour later, her neighbor started screaming.

"He said the dog had just been attacked by a coyote and was laying in our garage," she said as her voice began to shake. "She was very badly injured. The doctors couldn't fix her. We had to put her down."
Diamond is one of several animals that residents of the Tammany Lane neighborhood said have been killed in recent weeks by a coyote.

Many of the residents said they are living in fear, afraid to let their pets or children roam the quiet residential neighborhood -- a collection of several cul-de-sacs crisscrossed by a small stream and abutted by an expansive area of woods and wetlands.

Brian Flynn said he was driving home last week when the coyote passed in front of his car.

"It was huge," he said, noting that the coyote was at least knee-high, if not larger. "I heard it howling in the woods last night."

His sister, Chelsea Flynn, said she no longer lets her 4-year-old daughter play in the cul-de-sac in front of their house.

"I used to let her play outside all the time," she said. "There is never any traffic on our road. But now I stay really close to her. The coyote is making us all very nervous. I hope they catch him soon."

City Council President Joseph Cavo, who lives nearby, has been walking the neighborhood after work, talking with residents about the problem and educating them about coyotes.

He's also working with other city officials to hire a trapper to catch the animal.

Cavo said the city officials are applying for a permit from the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection while vetting potential trappers in the area.

"There are probably coyotes throughout Danbury, but this one appears to be very bold," Cavo said. "We will never catch every coyote and people need to be mindful of what can do to protect themselves."

While there haven't been any population estimates, DEEP wildlife biologist Paul Rego said there are probably "thousands" of the predatory animals living in the state.

"They are actually fairly common," he said. "Coyotes are very adaptable and they know how to use small pockets of undeveloped land that are interspersed in more densely developed areas."

Coyotes, who have no natural predator in the region, can attacks cats, small dogs, deer and even livestock including sheep and fowl, although that is rare in Connecticut, Rego said.

"We get many reports each year of coyotes attacking dogs and cats," he said.

If the coyote terrorizing the Tammany Lane community is caught, Rego said it will be euthanized.

"If the animal has demonstrated unwanted behavior towards humans, we don't have any place to release him where that behavior wouldn't continue," he said, adding that if the coyote were released into another coyote's territory, the animals "wouldn't live happily ever after."

He added that it could take years -- or maybe just weeks -- before another coyote took over the territory once an animal is trapped.

Residents can help to deter coyotes, Rego said, by not keeping food sources in their yards, including bird feeders that attract a variety of prey for the animals such as squirrels and chipmunks.

Pets, he added, should be supervised while outdoors when at all possible.

"If you do see a coyote try to scare if off by making loud noises and make sure there isn't a food source on your property that's attracting them," Rego said.

Costa, meanwhile, said she no longer feels safe in her own yard.

"I'm scared every time the grandchildren play outside," she said.

Her six- year-old granddaughter Briana keeps asking about Diamond.

"She keeps asking me every day where Diamond is," Costa said. "I haven't been able to tell her that she's dead."



Read more: http://www.newstimes.com/news/article/It-s-city-vs-varmint-3825336.php#ixzz253JUrJqZ


Reddhole
Aug 28 2012, 08:29 AM
Below is a story of a fight with a pit bull and a Coyote in southern California. The pit bull confronted a coyote and they fought for 5 minutes until the coyote ran off. The pit bull had some minor injuries, but we don't know about the coyote. My guess is that coyote wasn't injured too bad since it was able to run away and the witness described it as a coyote attacking the pit bull. IMHO, the coyote may have had pups in area accounting for aggressive action. Southern California coyotes only average about 20-25 lbs.

Coyote Attacks Pitbull
A coyote attacked a pitbull in his yard this month in Orange County. Newport Beach dog trainer Vladislav Roytapel says dogs owners must be vigilant.

By Nisha Gutierrez-Jaime Email the authorAugust 17, 2012

Playing ball recently turned into a vicious brawl with a coyote for one Orange County pitbull, and a Newport Beach dog trainer wants to make sure other dogs don't fall victim to another attack.

The owners of the pitbull, who asked to remain anonymous, want to keep the details of the attack private, but did tell Newport Beach dog trainer Vladislav Roytapel how an afternoon of throwing a tennis ball to their pitbull took a horrific turn.

"Their home is located on a big piece of property facing a wooded area, and suddenly the dog stopped playing and instead ran to the back of the yard to meet the coyote," Roytapel, who was hired to train the pitbull, explained. "The coyote didn't run away, and the owners screamed but couldn't stop the attack on their dog."

The coyote took off after about five minutes, but the pitbull was left with scratches and other minor injuries. He is expected to make a full recovery, Roytapel said.

Newport Beach is no stranger to coyote sightings. Senior Animal Control Officer Valerie Schomburg said that, much like surrounding cities, there have been coyotes spotted in Newport Beach, but authorities have not noticed an increase in coyote related calls.

According to Roytapel, problems arise because coyotes see small dogs as prey and large dogs as a threat and even a possible mate.

"Coyotes are increasingly attacking our pets from backyards and even in broad daylight as pet owners are out walking them on a leash," Roytapel said.

There are several ways for pet owners to protect their dogs from the clutches of a coyote. Here are some tips from Roytapel.

■ When your dogs are outside, make sure you always supervise them or secure them in a fully secure enclosed kennel
■ Keep your dog on a short leash during recreation and avoid retractable leashes
■ Don't ever encourage your dog to chase a coyote! Coyotes are not squirrels and they will fight back!
■ If you have a small dog and you see a coyote, pick them up immediately
■ Like domestic dogs, coyotes will defend their territory and their young. So don't approach to them!


Picture of pit bull:

http://losalamitos.patch.com/articles/pitbull-attacked-by-coyote#c

Posted Image



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Full Throttle
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Taipan
Oct 30 2012, 09:35 PM
Bull and Terrier
Oct 30 2012, 08:42 PM
It is like a small pet apbt.


Then we should all favour the coyote?


Reddhole
Oct 6 2012, 01:31 AM
Fairburn residents suspect coyotes behind pet attacks

FAIRBURN, Ga. - Residents in Fairburn are worried about coyotes attacking their pets.

Lewis Dunn snapped a photograph of two coyotes near his backyard that have mauled one pit bull and killed another. One attack occurred on Mehaffee Drive, while the other was on Fayetteville Road.

Experts say it's extremely unusual for a coyote to attack something as potentially vicious as a pit bull. But there are a couple of other unusual things about the coyotes seen in the photo. First, there are two of them. Coyotes are not usually seen together, wildlife experts say. Second, the sun is shining. Coyotes are rarely seen in the daytime.

"Usually if you see animals out like that, they might have distemper or parvo or early stages of rabies," said Dunn.

Officials believe that coyotes are feeding on pets and wildlife on the edge of the population and living in a vast area of woodlands in south Fulton County.

Lee Johnson, the owner of Uniques Taxidermy in Fairburn, has a state wildlife license to care for a deer. The coyotes have been digging nightly at the bottom of its enclosure, and Johnson fears the worst.

"They dug in about six months ago and killed one of my turkeys and took the turkey back out, so yeah they can get in," said Johnson.

The coyotes are believes to have attacked Willie Thorton's dog ,Coco, and killed another pit bull named Polo.

Johnson studies animals for a living and has clients from around the world. The coyotes have him both baffled and afraid for his wildlife and his neighbor's pets.

"I've known several people to say that their cats have disappeared to them. I had a friend that had a poodle that was yanked off his back porch here awhile back too," said Johnson.


http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/story/19587331/coyotes-suspected-in-fairburn-pit-bull-attacks


Reddhole
Aug 31 2012, 03:14 AM
Eastern coyote kills 14 year old female pit bull mix. Obviously, this was an old dog and surely not a top specimen.

The attitude of residents is dissappointing. Overstating the risk to humans and demanding the coyote's removal when the people chose to live in and area "abutted by an expansive area of woods and wetlands."

It's city vs varmint



Danbury may be a bustling city of more than 80,000 residents, but in one small neighborhood on the west side it's a howling, prowling coyote that's keeping people up at night.

Officials in the seventh-largest city in the state are looking to hire a trapper to catch the animal, which is getting blamed for attacking and killing several cats and dogs this summer.

Tammany Lane resident Ana Maria Costa was on the verge of tears this week as she described how a coyote killed Diamond, her 14-year-old pit bull mix, in broad daylight last month.

Costa said she had just gotten home from work and let Diamond out of the house when, less than half an hour later, her neighbor started screaming.

"He said the dog had just been attacked by a coyote and was laying in our garage," she said as her voice began to shake. "She was very badly injured. The doctors couldn't fix her. We had to put her down."
Diamond is one of several animals that residents of the Tammany Lane neighborhood said have been killed in recent weeks by a coyote.

Many of the residents said they are living in fear, afraid to let their pets or children roam the quiet residential neighborhood -- a collection of several cul-de-sacs crisscrossed by a small stream and abutted by an expansive area of woods and wetlands.

Brian Flynn said he was driving home last week when the coyote passed in front of his car.

"It was huge," he said, noting that the coyote was at least knee-high, if not larger. "I heard it howling in the woods last night."

His sister, Chelsea Flynn, said she no longer lets her 4-year-old daughter play in the cul-de-sac in front of their house.

"I used to let her play outside all the time," she said. "There is never any traffic on our road. But now I stay really close to her. The coyote is making us all very nervous. I hope they catch him soon."

City Council President Joseph Cavo, who lives nearby, has been walking the neighborhood after work, talking with residents about the problem and educating them about coyotes.

He's also working with other city officials to hire a trapper to catch the animal.

Cavo said the city officials are applying for a permit from the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection while vetting potential trappers in the area.

"There are probably coyotes throughout Danbury, but this one appears to be very bold," Cavo said. "We will never catch every coyote and people need to be mindful of what can do to protect themselves."

While there haven't been any population estimates, DEEP wildlife biologist Paul Rego said there are probably "thousands" of the predatory animals living in the state.

"They are actually fairly common," he said. "Coyotes are very adaptable and they know how to use small pockets of undeveloped land that are interspersed in more densely developed areas."

Coyotes, who have no natural predator in the region, can attacks cats, small dogs, deer and even livestock including sheep and fowl, although that is rare in Connecticut, Rego said.

"We get many reports each year of coyotes attacking dogs and cats," he said.

If the coyote terrorizing the Tammany Lane community is caught, Rego said it will be euthanized.

"If the animal has demonstrated unwanted behavior towards humans, we don't have any place to release him where that behavior wouldn't continue," he said, adding that if the coyote were released into another coyote's territory, the animals "wouldn't live happily ever after."

He added that it could take years -- or maybe just weeks -- before another coyote took over the territory once an animal is trapped.

Residents can help to deter coyotes, Rego said, by not keeping food sources in their yards, including bird feeders that attract a variety of prey for the animals such as squirrels and chipmunks.

Pets, he added, should be supervised while outdoors when at all possible.

"If you do see a coyote try to scare if off by making loud noises and make sure there isn't a food source on your property that's attracting them," Rego said.

Costa, meanwhile, said she no longer feels safe in her own yard.

"I'm scared every time the grandchildren play outside," she said.

Her six- year-old granddaughter Briana keeps asking about Diamond.

"She keeps asking me every day where Diamond is," Costa said. "I haven't been able to tell her that she's dead."



Read more: http://www.newstimes.com/news/article/It-s-city-vs-varmint-3825336.php#ixzz253JUrJqZ


Reddhole
Aug 28 2012, 08:29 AM
Below is a story of a fight with a pit bull and a Coyote in southern California. The pit bull confronted a coyote and they fought for 5 minutes until the coyote ran off. The pit bull had some minor injuries, but we don't know about the coyote. My guess is that coyote wasn't injured too bad since it was able to run away and the witness described it as a coyote attacking the pit bull. IMHO, the coyote may have had pups in area accounting for aggressive action. Southern California coyotes only average about 20-25 lbs.

Coyote Attacks Pitbull
A coyote attacked a pitbull in his yard this month in Orange County. Newport Beach dog trainer Vladislav Roytapel says dogs owners must be vigilant.

By Nisha Gutierrez-Jaime Email the authorAugust 17, 2012

Playing ball recently turned into a vicious brawl with a coyote for one Orange County pitbull, and a Newport Beach dog trainer wants to make sure other dogs don't fall victim to another attack.

The owners of the pitbull, who asked to remain anonymous, want to keep the details of the attack private, but did tell Newport Beach dog trainer Vladislav Roytapel how an afternoon of throwing a tennis ball to their pitbull took a horrific turn.

"Their home is located on a big piece of property facing a wooded area, and suddenly the dog stopped playing and instead ran to the back of the yard to meet the coyote," Roytapel, who was hired to train the pitbull, explained. "The coyote didn't run away, and the owners screamed but couldn't stop the attack on their dog."

The coyote took off after about five minutes, but the pitbull was left with scratches and other minor injuries. He is expected to make a full recovery, Roytapel said.

Newport Beach is no stranger to coyote sightings. Senior Animal Control Officer Valerie Schomburg said that, much like surrounding cities, there have been coyotes spotted in Newport Beach, but authorities have not noticed an increase in coyote related calls.

According to Roytapel, problems arise because coyotes see small dogs as prey and large dogs as a threat and even a possible mate.

"Coyotes are increasingly attacking our pets from backyards and even in broad daylight as pet owners are out walking them on a leash," Roytapel said.

There are several ways for pet owners to protect their dogs from the clutches of a coyote. Here are some tips from Roytapel.

■ When your dogs are outside, make sure you always supervise them or secure them in a fully secure enclosed kennel
■ Keep your dog on a short leash during recreation and avoid retractable leashes
■ Don't ever encourage your dog to chase a coyote! Coyotes are not squirrels and they will fight back!
■ If you have a small dog and you see a coyote, pick them up immediately
■ Like domestic dogs, coyotes will defend their territory and their young. So don't approach to them!


Picture of pit bull:

http://losalamitos.patch.com/articles/pitbull-attacked-by-coyote#c

Posted Image



The pit was left with 'scratches and other minor injuries'. No animal is walking away from a fight without a few scars. But, staffs have a massive advantage because of there jaw strength and there gameness. Even most pet staffs would fight another dog to the death, no special training or breeding required, they are tough

Against your average pet staffy, like this.
Posted Image

I would slightly favour the staffy, but a big eastern coyote may have what it takes to pull it off.

Posted Image
But against staffs like these, who are used in England for fox and badger hunting, it would be bye bye Wiley.
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Fox
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Coyote is comfortable winner against the average pet Staffy in my opinion. It has the height advantage plus greater speed and maneuverability.

Don't really know anything about the working type.
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Bull and Terrier
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Taipan
Oct 30 2012, 09:35 PM
Bull and Terrier
Oct 30 2012, 08:42 PM
It is like a small pet apbt.


Then we should all favour the coyote?


Reddhole
Oct 6 2012, 01:31 AM
Fairburn residents suspect coyotes behind pet attacks

FAIRBURN, Ga. - Residents in Fairburn are worried about coyotes attacking their pets.

Lewis Dunn snapped a photograph of two coyotes near his backyard that have mauled one pit bull and killed another. One attack occurred on Mehaffee Drive, while the other was on Fayetteville Road.

Experts say it's extremely unusual for a coyote to attack something as potentially vicious as a pit bull. But there are a couple of other unusual things about the coyotes seen in the photo. First, there are two of them. Coyotes are not usually seen together, wildlife experts say. Second, the sun is shining. Coyotes are rarely seen in the daytime.

"Usually if you see animals out like that, they might have distemper or parvo or early stages of rabies," said Dunn.

Officials believe that coyotes are feeding on pets and wildlife on the edge of the population and living in a vast area of woodlands in south Fulton County.

Lee Johnson, the owner of Uniques Taxidermy in Fairburn, has a state wildlife license to care for a deer. The coyotes have been digging nightly at the bottom of its enclosure, and Johnson fears the worst.

"They dug in about six months ago and killed one of my turkeys and took the turkey back out, so yeah they can get in," said Johnson.

The coyotes are believes to have attacked Willie Thorton's dog ,Coco, and killed another pit bull named Polo.

Johnson studies animals for a living and has clients from around the world. The coyotes have him both baffled and afraid for his wildlife and his neighbor's pets.

"I've known several people to say that their cats have disappeared to them. I had a friend that had a poodle that was yanked off his back porch here awhile back too," said Johnson.


http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/story/19587331/coyotes-suspected-in-fairburn-pit-bull-attacks


Reddhole
Aug 31 2012, 03:14 AM
Eastern coyote kills 14 year old female pit bull mix. Obviously, this was an old dog and surely not a top specimen.

The attitude of residents is dissappointing. Overstating the risk to humans and demanding the coyote's removal when the people chose to live in and area "abutted by an expansive area of woods and wetlands."

It's city vs varmint



Danbury may be a bustling city of more than 80,000 residents, but in one small neighborhood on the west side it's a howling, prowling coyote that's keeping people up at night.

Officials in the seventh-largest city in the state are looking to hire a trapper to catch the animal, which is getting blamed for attacking and killing several cats and dogs this summer.

Tammany Lane resident Ana Maria Costa was on the verge of tears this week as she described how a coyote killed Diamond, her 14-year-old pit bull mix, in broad daylight last month.

Costa said she had just gotten home from work and let Diamond out of the house when, less than half an hour later, her neighbor started screaming.

"He said the dog had just been attacked by a coyote and was laying in our garage," she said as her voice began to shake. "She was very badly injured. The doctors couldn't fix her. We had to put her down."
Diamond is one of several animals that residents of the Tammany Lane neighborhood said have been killed in recent weeks by a coyote.

Many of the residents said they are living in fear, afraid to let their pets or children roam the quiet residential neighborhood -- a collection of several cul-de-sacs crisscrossed by a small stream and abutted by an expansive area of woods and wetlands.

Brian Flynn said he was driving home last week when the coyote passed in front of his car.

"It was huge," he said, noting that the coyote was at least knee-high, if not larger. "I heard it howling in the woods last night."

His sister, Chelsea Flynn, said she no longer lets her 4-year-old daughter play in the cul-de-sac in front of their house.

"I used to let her play outside all the time," she said. "There is never any traffic on our road. But now I stay really close to her. The coyote is making us all very nervous. I hope they catch him soon."

City Council President Joseph Cavo, who lives nearby, has been walking the neighborhood after work, talking with residents about the problem and educating them about coyotes.

He's also working with other city officials to hire a trapper to catch the animal.

Cavo said the city officials are applying for a permit from the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection while vetting potential trappers in the area.

"There are probably coyotes throughout Danbury, but this one appears to be very bold," Cavo said. "We will never catch every coyote and people need to be mindful of what can do to protect themselves."

While there haven't been any population estimates, DEEP wildlife biologist Paul Rego said there are probably "thousands" of the predatory animals living in the state.

"They are actually fairly common," he said. "Coyotes are very adaptable and they know how to use small pockets of undeveloped land that are interspersed in more densely developed areas."

Coyotes, who have no natural predator in the region, can attacks cats, small dogs, deer and even livestock including sheep and fowl, although that is rare in Connecticut, Rego said.

"We get many reports each year of coyotes attacking dogs and cats," he said.

If the coyote terrorizing the Tammany Lane community is caught, Rego said it will be euthanized.

"If the animal has demonstrated unwanted behavior towards humans, we don't have any place to release him where that behavior wouldn't continue," he said, adding that if the coyote were released into another coyote's territory, the animals "wouldn't live happily ever after."

He added that it could take years -- or maybe just weeks -- before another coyote took over the territory once an animal is trapped.

Residents can help to deter coyotes, Rego said, by not keeping food sources in their yards, including bird feeders that attract a variety of prey for the animals such as squirrels and chipmunks.

Pets, he added, should be supervised while outdoors when at all possible.

"If you do see a coyote try to scare if off by making loud noises and make sure there isn't a food source on your property that's attracting them," Rego said.

Costa, meanwhile, said she no longer feels safe in her own yard.

"I'm scared every time the grandchildren play outside," she said.

Her six- year-old granddaughter Briana keeps asking about Diamond.

"She keeps asking me every day where Diamond is," Costa said. "I haven't been able to tell her that she's dead."



Read more: http://www.newstimes.com/news/article/It-s-city-vs-varmint-3825336.php#ixzz253JUrJqZ


Reddhole
Aug 28 2012, 08:29 AM
Below is a story of a fight with a pit bull and a Coyote in southern California. The pit bull confronted a coyote and they fought for 5 minutes until the coyote ran off. The pit bull had some minor injuries, but we don't know about the coyote. My guess is that coyote wasn't injured too bad since it was able to run away and the witness described it as a coyote attacking the pit bull. IMHO, the coyote may have had pups in area accounting for aggressive action. Southern California coyotes only average about 20-25 lbs.

Coyote Attacks Pitbull
A coyote attacked a pitbull in his yard this month in Orange County. Newport Beach dog trainer Vladislav Roytapel says dogs owners must be vigilant.

By Nisha Gutierrez-Jaime Email the authorAugust 17, 2012

Playing ball recently turned into a vicious brawl with a coyote for one Orange County pitbull, and a Newport Beach dog trainer wants to make sure other dogs don't fall victim to another attack.

The owners of the pitbull, who asked to remain anonymous, want to keep the details of the attack private, but did tell Newport Beach dog trainer Vladislav Roytapel how an afternoon of throwing a tennis ball to their pitbull took a horrific turn.

"Their home is located on a big piece of property facing a wooded area, and suddenly the dog stopped playing and instead ran to the back of the yard to meet the coyote," Roytapel, who was hired to train the pitbull, explained. "The coyote didn't run away, and the owners screamed but couldn't stop the attack on their dog."

The coyote took off after about five minutes, but the pitbull was left with scratches and other minor injuries. He is expected to make a full recovery, Roytapel said.

Newport Beach is no stranger to coyote sightings. Senior Animal Control Officer Valerie Schomburg said that, much like surrounding cities, there have been coyotes spotted in Newport Beach, but authorities have not noticed an increase in coyote related calls.

According to Roytapel, problems arise because coyotes see small dogs as prey and large dogs as a threat and even a possible mate.

"Coyotes are increasingly attacking our pets from backyards and even in broad daylight as pet owners are out walking them on a leash," Roytapel said.

There are several ways for pet owners to protect their dogs from the clutches of a coyote. Here are some tips from Roytapel.

■ When your dogs are outside, make sure you always supervise them or secure them in a fully secure enclosed kennel
■ Keep your dog on a short leash during recreation and avoid retractable leashes
■ Don't ever encourage your dog to chase a coyote! Coyotes are not squirrels and they will fight back!
■ If you have a small dog and you see a coyote, pick them up immediately
■ Like domestic dogs, coyotes will defend their territory and their young. So don't approach to them!


Picture of pit bull:

http://losalamitos.patch.com/articles/pitbull-attacked-by-coyote#c

Posted Image



As you can see, a pitbull mix? What does that tell you? It is not a pure apbt atleast, also, 2 vs apbt, then they should win, and the last one, the pit only got minor injuries, nothing serious, not really a win for the coyote. There are several cases of pits fighting off several coyotes.

I meant that a show staffie is almost the same as a small pet apbt, while working stock from both breeds are basically the same dog. So no, I would definently favour the staffie in this matchup.

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Bull and Terrier
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Fox
Oct 30 2012, 10:32 PM
Coyote is comfortable winner against the average pet Staffy in my opinion. It has the height advantage plus greater speed and maneuverability.

Don't really know anything about the working type.
When has height given the advantage, most dogs specialised for fighting are actually low to the ground for their size. This comes trough for a lot off wild animals too, HB, badgers and wolverine. Most big cats are low to the ground compared to similarly sized wolves and hyenas.

Even a pet staffy would win, they are in another leauge than other similarly sized canines even when show breed. Actually fighting breeds maneuverability in close quarters are second to none, this you can see when they play with a much faster dog. Also sbt's are known for high jumps up to 3m.
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Canidae
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and the last one, the pit only got minor injuries, nothing serious, not really a win for the coyote.

Not a win for the pitbull either, and certianly destroys the claim of the superior bully breeds over wild canids.
There is also the two larger pitbulls that failed to finish a single coyote and got bad nasal bites in the process. They're just very inefficient killers it would seem.

Bull and Terrier
 
There are several cases of pits fighting off several coyotes.

Any examples? Not from hunters, whom I'd trust about as far as I could throw.

Regarding the skulls, were they at equal weights do you know?

For the matchup, at max weights or if an Eastern Coyote at similar weights is the canid in question, it will win convincingly.

A much smaller, slighter western Coyote at similar weights would be up for a painful fight, who would win though I'm unsure. Reading 2 larger pitbulls fail to kill one and get wounded in the process, and on top of that the various other accounts that show pitbulls really aren't as powerful as dog fans claim, really makes me wonder how a single staffie would fare against a single western at parity.
Edited by Canidae, Oct 30 2012, 11:29 PM.
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Vita
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Some months back there were some images of a mountain cur or a similar breed who whipped coyotes by itself. The owner of the dog had videos of his dog taking out numerous coyotes as well. At parity I'd favor a staff over any other wild canid actually.
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Full Throttle
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Vita
Oct 30 2012, 11:51 PM
Some months back there were some images of a mountain cur or a similar breed who whipped coyotes by itself. The owner of the dog had videos of his dog taking out numerous coyotes as well. At parity I'd favor a staff over any other wild canid actually.
I've seen those photos as well, I'll try to find them. The point is domestic dogs stand a fair chance against coyotes, if a cur is killing coyotes as large as himself, surely a more powerful and commutative breed would fare just as well if not better.
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k9boy
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Heres the coyote- mountain cur fight http://carnivoraforum.com/topic/9750156/1/
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Mauro20
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Staffy wins IMO. It would not be easy.
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FireCrown
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The terrier might drive coyote with it's ferocity
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