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Who wins?
Afrovenator 5 (71.4%)
Dryptosaurus 2 (28.6%)
Total Votes: 7
Afrovenator abakensis v Dryptosaurus aquilunguis
Topic Started: Dec 17 2012, 09:49 PM (1,484 Views)
DinosaurMichael
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Apex Predator
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Afrovenator abakensis
Afrovenator ( /ˌæfroʊvɨˈneɪtər/; "African hunter") is a genus of megalosaurid theropod dinosaur from the mid Jurassic Period of northern Africa. It was a bipedal predator, with a mouthful of sharp teeth and three claws on each hand. Judging from the one skeleton known, this dinosaur was approximately 9 metres (30 ft) long, from snout to tail tip, and had a weight of about 1.5 long tons (1.5 t).

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Dryptosaurus aquilunguis
Dryptosaurus (from Greek δρύπτω, drypto, "to tear" and σαυρος sauros, "lizard") was a genus of primitive tyrannosaur that lived in Eastern North America during the middle Maastrichtian stage of the Late Cretaceous period. Although largely unknown now outside of academic circles, a famous painting of the genus by Charles R. Knight made it one of the more widely known dinosaurs of its time, in spite of its poor fossil record. Its specific name aquilunguis is Latin for "having claws like an eagle's". Dryptosaurus is estimated to have been 7.5 metres (25 ft) long and to have weighed 1.5 metric tons (1.7 short tons), although this is based on partial remains of one individual. Like its relative Eotyrannus, Dryptosaurus seems to have had relatively long arms compared to, for example, Tyrannosaurus, and the hands are believed to have had three fingers. Each of these fingers was tipped by a talonlike 8 inch claw. These claws lend a meaning for the type species aquilunguis: eagle-clawed.

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Dark allosaurus
Dec 16 2012, 12:15 PM
Afrovenator vs dryptosaurus
Edited by Taipan, May 20 2015, 10:50 PM.
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Jinfengopteryx
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Aspiring paleontologist, science enthusiast and armchair speculative fiction/evolution writer
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Why is the most recent post said to be today (not counting this one)?

Anyway, the match itself seems to be very balanced (close to 50/50), I'll wait for what others have to say before I pick a side.
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Taipan
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Jinfengopteryx
Dec 28 2017, 10:37 PM
Why is the most recent post said to be today (not counting this one)?


'Bumping' a thread via moderation, resets its most recent post date.

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Mammuthus
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This is 50/50. Both have very similar body masses and unlike some of Theropods, they both had rather larger arms.
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Carnotaur
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Considering both are large similar sized theropods, I would say this is a very close figth, but I'm not sure it is a 50/50. Take a look at these excerpts*:

"This combination of a large hand and short humerus is unusual among theropods. Other theropods have large hands and correspondingly enlarged manual ungual phalanges (Rauhut, 2003), including spinosaurids (Charig and Milner, 1997), the megalosaurid Torvosaurus (Galton and Jensen, 1979) and neovenatorid allosauroids (Benson and Xu, 2008; Benson et al., 2010b) (table 3). However, all of these taxa also have proportionally elongate forelimbs with long humeri, unlike those of Dryptosaurus and tyrannosaurids. Therefore, the combination of a proportionally short humerus and a large hand is considered an autapomorphy of Dryptosaurus among theropods"

"[...] it is worth noting that much of the skull is unknown in Dryptosaurus, and the few skull fragments exhibit some features unlike those of large-skull, short-armed tyrannosaurids (e.g., ziphodont teeth, more delicately constructed maxilla and dentary)."


" Similarly, although the hand of Dryptosaurus is large, the ungual flexor tubercles and degree of curvature are reduced compared to more basal tyrannosauroids, indicating a loss of some grasping ability. "

"In sum, neither the skull nor hands of Dryptosaurus were as well developed for predatory function as in derived tyrannosaurids and basal tyrannosauroids, respectively"

So, while Dryptosaurus's forearms where certainly more well developed than its short-armed cousins, its humeri were proportionally smaller than those of megalosauroids (including Afrovenator), and its large hands may not have been very well adapted for grasping. Also, its jaws probably weren't very robust (at least when compared to those of tyrannosaurids), and thus likely weren't well adapted for enduring stress and applying powerful bite forces.

I couldn't find any available osteological studies on Afrovenator, but I would expect, based on studies on other megalosaurids (namely Megalosaurus, Torvosaurus and Wiehenvenator), that it possessed large, robust jaws, and extremely robust forearms. If that is the case, I think it should have the advantage against the tyrannosaurid, because of its (possibly) more robust jaws and larger humeri (meaning bigger sites for muscle attatchment). If Afrovenator, like Dryptosaurus, had more delicate skull bones than those of its relatives, then I would also think that this figth would be close to a 50/50.

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Edited by Carnotaur, Dec 30 2017, 02:20 AM.
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Drift
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High Spined Lizard
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Mammuthus
Dec 29 2017, 08:03 AM
This is 50/50. Both have very similar body masses and unlike some of Theropods, they both had rather larger arms.
Yes and when they're so similar in the forelimb area their jaws will determine the winner.
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