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Who wins?
Allosaurus fragilis 8 (100%)
Carnotaurus sastrei 0 (0%)
Total Votes: 8
Allosaurus fragilis v Carnotaurus sastrei
Topic Started: Jun 17 2013, 09:04 PM (12,355 Views)
Taipan
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Allosaurus fragilis
Allosaurus (play /ˌælɵˈsɔrəs/) is a genus of large theropod dinosaur that lived 155 to 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period (Kimmeridgian to early Tithonian). Allosaurus was a large bipedal predator. Its skull was large and equipped with dozens of large, sharp teeth. It averaged 8.5 meters (28 ft) in length, though fragmentary remains suggest it could have reached over 12 meters (39 ft). Relative to the large and powerful hindlimbs, its three-fingered forelimbs were small, and the body was balanced by a long, heavy tail. As the most abundant large predator in the Morrison Formation, Allosaurus was at the top of the food chain, probably preying on contemporaneous large herbivorous dinosaurs and perhaps even other predators (e.g. Ceratosaurus). Potential prey included ornithopods, stegosaurids, and sauropods. Allosaurus was a typical large theropod, having a massive skull on a short neck, a long tail and reduced forelimbs. Allosaurus fragilis, the best-known species, had an average length of 8.5 meters (28 ft), with the largest definitive Allosaurus specimen (AMNH 680) estimated at 9.7 meters long (32 ft), and an estimated weight of 2.3 metric tons (2.5 short tons). In his 1976 monograph on Allosaurus, James Madsen mentioned a range of bone sizes which he interpreted to show a maximum length of 12 to 13 meters (40 to 43 ft). As with dinosaurs in general, weight estimates are debatable, and since 1980 have ranged between 1500 kilograms (3300 lb), 1000 to 4000 kilograms (2200 to 8800 lb), and 1010 kilograms (2230 lb) for modal adult weight (not maximum). John Foster, a specialist on the Morrison Formation, suggests that 1000 kg (2200 lb) is reasonable for large adults of A. fragilis, but that 700 kg (1500 lb) is a closer estimate for individuals represented by the average-sized thigh bones he has measured. Using the subadult specimen nicknamed "Big Al", researchers using computer modelling arrived at a best estimate of 1,500 kilograms (3,300 lb) for the individual, but by varying parameters they found a range from approximately 1,400 kilograms (3,100 lb) to approximately 2,000 kilograms (4,400 lb).

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Carnotaurus sastrei
Carnotaurus was a large predatory dinosaur. Only one species, Carnotaurus sastrei has been described so far. Carnotaurus lived in Patagonia, Argentina (La Colonia Formation) during the Campanian or Maastrichtian stage of the Late Cretaceous. Carnotaurus was a large theropod, about 8 metres (26 ft) in length, weighing between 1488 kg and 2626 kg (1.6–2.9 short tons), depending on the method of estimation. The most distinctive features of Carnotaurus are the two thick horns above the eyes, and the extremely reduced forelimbs with four basic digits, though only the middle two of these ended in finger bones, while the fourth was splint-like and may have represented an external 'spur.' The fingers themselves were fused and immobile, and lacked claws. It is also characterized by its unusually long neck (compared to other abelisaurs), and its small head with box-shaped jaws. The eyes of Carnotaurus faced forward, which is unusual in a dinosaur, and may indicate binocular vision and depth perception. There is a rather puzzling contrast between Carnotaurus’ deep, robust-looking skull and its shallow, slender lower jaw. So far no one has worked out what this might imply about its methods of feeding.

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DarkGricer
Jun 16 2013, 10:32 PM
Carnotaurus VS Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus


Ceratosaurus is probably too small, so lets try this first.
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SpinoInWonderland
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Allosaurus wins this in my opinion, they're similar in size, but Allosaurus has more formidable weapons, and more of them to boot.
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Ausar
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I have little trouble seeing Allosaurus doing good damage with its axe-bite and bite, though the abelisaurid has a damaging bite of its own. Allosaurus wins due to more weaponry (eg: bite, axe bite, probably arms).
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DarkGricer
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Carno is probably one of the least dangerous of the Theropods. It's only real weapon (It's jaws) wasn't all that effective. Allosaurus on the other hand is probably one of the most well armed of all Theropods, with a hatchet bite and enormous claws. Allosaurus wins 85% of the time. C.dentisulcatus would've been a better match for Carno.
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retic
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allosaurus wins due to better weaponry.
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theropod
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palaeontology, open source and survival enthusiast
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Allosaurus should win this. Not only probably the larger animal, at least for big specimens, but also much more well-adapted towards macrophagy, and with more effective, larger and more numerous weapons (sturdy skull mounted on a long, powerful and flexible neck, effective slicing dentition and arms bearing strong claws). Carnotaurus is simply a very specialized animal adapted for speed, and its jaws are heavily shortened and certainly less potent than Allosaurus'
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Jinfengopteryx
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This is at length parity, right (8 m both)? Allosaurus has pretty much every advantage.
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theropod
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At lenght parity, I suppose carnotaurus would be the taller and bulkier animal. However weaponery and ability to use its strenght is a clear point in favour of the carnosaur, while the abelisaur is mainly specialized in speed, not fighting.
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7Alx
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Allosaurus takes it, at least 75 % or more.

Despite Carnotaurus was taller at length parity (around UUVP 6000 sized Allosaurus), this abelisaurid may be rather poor weaponry (probably not effective bite and almost useless arms). Against AMNH 680, AMNH 290... That would be overkill.


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Creed
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Allo wins but if you put a really huge carno it would be really fair.
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SpinoInWonderland
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Carcharadon
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Shark Toothed Reptile
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^ If that comparisons right then this is rather a huge mismatch in favor of allosaurus...... AMNH 680 would absolutely destroy any carnotaurus.....
Edited by Carcharadon, Jul 29 2013, 12:49 AM.
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Spinodontosaurus
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It would probably be fairer to use a more 'normal' sized Allosaurus such as UUVP 6000, rather than the huge AMNH 680 (although it probaby isn't the outright largest to be fair).
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theropod
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^that's true. Average for Allosaurus ought to be somewhere between 8 and 9m.
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terminator
Autotrophic Organism
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Average for allosaurus is somewhere in between 10 and 12 metres long.
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